Sightseeing in Inkster

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Phoenix Theatres transports its audiences to exotic lands, forbidden romances, and CGI-animal kingdoms of the 100% digital silver screen. With some films shown in RealD XL 3-D, crowds can immerse themselves even further into the suspended belief of film. Phoenix Theatres' Ensemble offers a rotating selection specialty programs such as plays, operas, and ballets. Concessions provide free refills on sodas and large popcorns, fueling imaginations for sprints toward stories' thrilling or heartwarming resolutions.

17310 N Laurel Park Dr
Livonia,
MI
US

Exo's talented staffers beautify clients from head to toe with a full menu of grooming services. During the shellac manicure (a $35 value), nail technicians buff finger shingles to a dazzling sparkle before brushing on CND shellac color. The high-tech lacquer lasts up to two weeks with a glistening mirror finish, which dries instantly under the onslaught of British knock-knock jokes. This option also grants wrist mitts a thorough mollycoddling with a moisturizing paraffin dip treatment, which also includes exfoliation to force has-been skin cells into retirement.

6708 Park Ave
Allen Park,
MI
US

Located in Detroit's Cultural Center, the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History is one of the world's largest institutions dedicated to the African-American experience. Covering 120,000 square feet, the museum houses five rotating exhibitions, including Ain't Nothing Like the Real Thing: How the Apollo Theater Shaped American Entertainment, and five permanent exhibitions, such as the 22,000-square-foot core exhibit And Still We Rise: Our Journey Through African American History and Culture. Also at the museum are the Louise Lovett Wright Library & Archives and the Ford Rotunda, which boasts a 55-foot-high glass dome that dumps artificial snow when shaken by giants.

13624 Michigan Ave
Dearborn,
MI
US

Marvin Yagoda, the owner of Marvin's Marvelous Mechanical Museum, has amassed mechanical oddities and coin-operated machines since 1960 and regularly updates his collection of curiosities with new additions. A champion of all things outlandish, Marvin ensures that no nook or cranny in the 5,000-square-foot space remains unembellished with treasures such as P.T. Barnum's famous Cardiff Giant, as featured in RoadsideAmerica.com, or the AutoWed, America's first and only coin-operated wedding-ring dispenser for on-the-fly unions, replete with wedding music and an AutoDivorce voucher. Rafters atop 40-foot ceilings anchor low-flying model planes, and walls cloak themselves in vintage photos and pictures. Modern machines mingle with antique contraptions, whose old-timey noises and quaint images whisk visitors away to days of yore as effectively as a coal-powered wormhole.

A concession stand ensures that players remain sated and hydrated, and a prize shop enables guests to trade in their hard-earned game tickets for rewards such as figurines, toys, and yacht cruises with the Pac-Man family. To share its quarter-munching contraptions with as many visitors as possible, the museum remains open 365 days a year and offers free admission.

31005 Orchard Lake Rd.
Farmington Hills,
MI
US

On November 19, 1928, the Detroit Historical Society opened the Detroit Historical Museum in a one-room suite on the 23rd floor of the Barlum Tower, earning it the nickname of highest museum in the world. These days, Detroit’s Cultural Center accommodates the museum in an 80,000-square-foot space, where interactive exhibits preserve more than 300 years of city history. Frontiers to Factories traces Detroit's transformation from French-frontier outpost to industrial city, while America's Motor City celebrates its automotive dominance with a changing display of classic vehicles and a 1903 Model T that guests can sit in. Streets of Old Detroit brings the 19th century to life with recreated cobblestone streets that wind past stores of the era such as a five-and-dime, a soda shop, and a barbershop for powdered wigs.

Thanks to recent renovations, the society has expanded its chronicle of Detroit with three new permanent exhibitions. Detroit: The Arsenal of Democracy covers the ways the city's industrial infrastructure adapted to demands of World War II, and The Gallery of Innovation includes videos about renown innovators and hands-on activities of trial-and-error. As The Allesee Gallery of Culture examines the city's cultural history, its Kid Rock Music Lab lets visitors create and share their own music using interactive displays. Outside, the Detroit Legends Plaza honors the city's sports, entertainment, and media legends with cemented handprints and signatures from stars such as Lily Tomlin and Martha Reeves.

5401 Woodward Ave
Detroit,
MI
US

Nestled within the historic Hitsville USA quarters of Motown Record Corporation, the Motown Museum dazzles the optic nerves of audiophiles with retina-regaling displays that flash back to the golden age of music. Foray into the historic duplex that enshrines the restored apartment of Berry Gordy Jr. before tiptoeing through Studio A to reverberate ripened rumors fresh from a grapevine within its iconic echo chamber. As they follow the trajectory of rhythm-and-blues history, visiting duos can pore over a comprehensive collection of photographs, memorabilia, and invisible air molecules once inhaled by famous recording artists. Bask in the soulful warmth of the Marvin Gaye exhibition or burst into synchronized moonwalks while ogling Michael Jackson’s signature glove-and-hat ensemble.

2648 W Grand Blvd
Detroit,
MI
US