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Conceived by Las Vegas restaurateur Mark DiMartino, Tilted Kilt evokes Ireland by way of Vegas, with waitresses dressed in plaid mini kilts shouldering trays of chilled beer and pub fare. Like an enchilada stuffed with four-leaf clovers, the eatery’s Irish nachos interpret a south-of-the-border classic in a Celtic way, slathering potato chips in cheese sauce and seasoned ground beef; alternatively, pot roast and vegetables simmer traditionally in the Olde Dublin Irish stew’s Guinness-infused beef stock. Barkeeps pour a full bar’s worth of wine, cocktails, and beer, which surfaces in bottles, bombers, and multi-brew mixes such as the Blue Moon and Guinness combination. High-definition TVs glow with a ceaseless parade of professional and college baseball, basketball, and hockey, and live bands add to the entertainment smorgasbord on Friday and Saturday nights.

201 Marin Blvd
Jersey City,
NJ
US

Don’t let the shepherd's pie, fish 'n' chips, and draft beers fool you. Though Tilted Kilt snatches up the best cultural fragments of Scotland, England, and the Emerald Isle, the eatery started in Las Vegas. Restaurateur Mark DiMartino sought to combine the communal, rousing feel of pubs in the British Isles with the campy fun of American sports bars, pairing hearty food and traditional trappings with televisions and waitresses clad in mini kilts and alluring plaid halter-tops modeled after William Wallace’s eveningwear.

Since its founding, Tilted Kilt locations have popped up in 25 states and two Canadian provinces, serving all manner of hybrid dishes such as the Scottish cheese steak, the Sloppy Jane made with sliced turkey or shaved rib eye, and the Tilted Guilt, an ice-cream sundae perched atop a cookie.

800 Jackson St
Hoboken,
NJ
US

Wicked Wolf Tavern celebrates the relationship between food and drink by combining frosty brews with hearty pub-style fare, a pairing as American as the eatery's old-fashioned wooden accents and its view of the New York skyline and waterfront. Buffalo calamari and plates of nachos precede fish 'n' chips and burgers bedecked with fried eggs and jalapeños, which diners enjoy while basking in the glow of flat-screen TVs or guarding the wooden bar from packs of wild beers. Each week, Wicked Wolf Tavern lets loose the call of an oversize conch shell to summon live bands onto its stage. In addition to music, the bar also hosts events and specials Sunday–Friday.

120 Sinatra Dr
Hoboken,
NJ
US

A barrow boy pushes his cart past horse-drawn carriages, police on horseback, and a lady on a stroll, parasol in hand. This historical scene, appropriately tinted in sepia, hangs above diners at Pound & Pence, where it's one of two 10-foot murals that depict lively streets and pubs in 19th Century England. Pound & Pence's proprietors can't recreate the days of Dickens on all New York's streets, but they do conjure an old-timey vibe inside their establishment. A billiards table and leather wingback chairs stand among dark stained wood adorned with vintage English memorabilia.

The across-the-pond homage continues behind a bar stocked with English gins, an extensive scotch and cognac collection, and fixings for cocktails such as London Fog: a blend of gin, elderflower liquor, and lime juice. Pound & Pence's menu honors both English and American cuisine with selections ranging from bangers and housemade mash to spicy chicken fingers. During meals, up to 300 diners can chat with their neighbors or take in a game on one of the pub's more contemporary touches: a 10-foot HD projector screen.

55 Liberty St.
New York,
NY
US

The aromas of wings slathered in pomegranate sauce and homemade fettuccini alfredo just emerging from the kitchen fills the air inside Brick City Bar and Grill. Diners settle in to "half-moon booths" and peer over at the "plasma screens behind the granite bar" described by NJ.com. A wall of water enclosed in glass separates the restaurant and bar, where red lighting on the ceiling illuminates hardwood floors, wooden tables, and exposed brick walls below. Twenty draft beers fill glasses, while screens above let guests keep up with sports and the latest changes in coaches' hairstyles. A classic rock soundtrack energizes the room until midnight Sunday–Wednesday and 1 a.m. Thursday–Saturday.

35 Edison Pl
Newark,
NJ
US

The rear of Tribeca Tap House's bar looks like it's survived since colonial times, with thick planks of aged wood sunk into the brick wall. The bar itself stands in contrast, sporting a clean, modern design that includes tap handles mounted on polished metal. It's a fitting image for a restaurant that sticks to the basics of a neighborhood watering hole—namely cold drafts and hot food—and then elevates them with a heavy selection of craft beers and New American gastropub dishes.

The all-day menu tempts patrons with specialties such as crispy shrimp ‘n’ chips and the Tap House burger, a ground-in-house blend of sirloin, chuck, and brisket. The chefs' sandwiching skills continue to shine in more complex assemblages as well, such as the short-rib grilled cheese, which enfolds wild mushrooms, caramelized onions, and chipotle gouda on texas toast. And no pub meal is complete without a fried appetizer, of which Tribeca Tap House has many, including cornmeal-crusted pickle chips—frickles—accompanied by ranch sauce. Bartenders pour more than 20 draft beers at any time, keeping guests cool and calm as they watch sports games on one of many flat-screen televisions. The surrounding decor is heavy on rustic wood and brick, although works from local artists interject the handsome earth tones with pops of color.

365 Greenwich St
New York,
NY
US