Pubs in Jersey City

Select Local Merchants

The rear of Tribeca Tap House's bar looks like it's survived since colonial times, with thick planks of aged wood sunk into the brick wall. The bar itself stands in contrast, sporting a clean, modern design that includes tap handles mounted on polished metal. It's a fitting image for a restaurant that sticks to the basics of a neighborhood watering hole—namely cold drafts and hot food—and then elevates them with a heavy selection of craft beers and New American gastropub dishes.

The all-day menu tempts patrons with specialties such as crispy shrimp ‘n’ chips and the Tap House burger, a ground-in-house blend of sirloin, chuck, and brisket. The chefs' sandwiching skills continue to shine in more complex assemblages as well, such as the short-rib grilled cheese, which enfolds wild mushrooms, caramelized onions, and chipotle gouda on texas toast. And no pub meal is complete without a fried appetizer, of which Tribeca Tap House has many, including cornmeal-crusted pickle chips—frickles—accompanied by ranch sauce. Bartenders pour more than 20 draft beers at any time, keeping guests cool and calm as they watch sports games on one of many flat-screen televisions. The surrounding decor is heavy on rustic wood and brick, although works from local artists interject the handsome earth tones with pops of color.

365 Greenwich St
New York,
NY
US

Named after the ill-fated tavern from the film An American Werewolf in Paris, The Slaughtered Lamb Pub evokes an eerie atmosphere with midnight-dark lighting, exposed wood rafters, and the feel of an English tavern. Darts fly down in the Dungeon—the pub’s dedicated game room—and a fire roars in the Werewolf Lounge, where patrons cozy up to any number of world-traveled brews. The gargantuan beer list brings together imported craft libations, such as Spaten pilsner, Saint Sixtus trappist ale, and Dragon stout, along with stateside favorites.

Not to be upstaged, the food menu similarly cobbles together culinary inspiration from across the globe. The pub’s signature chicken wings, for example, come slathered in a smattering of sauces, such as jamaican jerk, spicy thai red curry with lemongrass and coconut milk, and maple chipotle. The menu is anchored by a slate of burgers with dolled-up delights, such as the Slaughtered Lamb burger, which is topped with smoked bacon and fresh buffalo mozzarella.

182 W 4th St
New York,
NY
US

A barrow boy pushes his cart past horse-drawn carriages, police on horseback, and a lady on a stroll, parasol in hand. This historical scene, appropriately tinted in sepia, hangs above diners at Pound & Pence, where it's one of two 10-foot murals that depict lively streets and pubs in 19th Century England. Pound & Pence's proprietors can't recreate the days of Dickens on all New York's streets, but they do conjure an old-timey vibe inside their establishment. A billiards table and leather wingback chairs stand among dark stained wood adorned with vintage English memorabilia.

The across-the-pond homage continues behind a bar stocked with English gins, an extensive scotch and cognac collection, and fixings for cocktails such as London Fog: a blend of gin, elderflower liquor, and lime juice. Pound & Pence's menu honors both English and American cuisine with selections ranging from bangers and housemade mash to spicy chicken fingers. During meals, up to 300 diners can chat with their neighbors or take in a game on one of the pub's more contemporary touches: a 10-foot HD projector screen.

55 Liberty St.
New York,
NY
US

The city of Nelson is literally a world away from the hum and hubbub of Manhattan. It sits under cerulean skies on the northern shore of New Zealand’s South Island, its residents epitomizing a laid-back attitude seen so rarely on New York’s crowded streets. As Nelson Blue's self-proclaimed "resident Kiwi," Pauli Morgan doesn’t seem to mind that he’s a bit of an anomaly. When he opened the restaurant and bar in the heart of the Financial District, he wanted to capture everything that he missed about his former home: the company, the cuisine, and the creativity. With the help of chef Eric Lind, he has done just that. New Zealand–inspired lamb skewers and grilled squid share the menu with savory beef pies from nearby Down Under Bakery. Morgan also props up his homeland’s economy by importing many of Nelson Blue’s beers and condiments directly from New Zealand. Homesick Kiwis can find solace in a pint of Moa beer or a glass filled with Wattie’s Tomato Sauce as they take in views of the Brooklyn Bridge from the bar’s patio.

235 Front Street
New York,
NY
US

Little Town NYC unabashedly hearts New York. Of its three restaurants, two are located in iconic Manhattan spots: one in Union Square, the other on Theater District’s Restaurant Row. Little Town’s fancy for the Empire State shines through on the menu, too, with homestyle dishes such as the Adirondack chicken pesto and an Angus beef burger topped with crispy Berkshire bacon. The Suburb Backyard BBQ platter is piled high with enough buffalo wings, Nathan's hot dogs, and other locally inspired fare to feed a family of four.

Little Town NYC also takes great pride in its beer list, which features more than 100 local brews, including IPAs and amber ales that hail from breweries in Long Island, Ithaca, and Saratoga Springs. At the Restaurant Row location, you can enjoy a pilsner from Coney Island while sitting in a booth constructed from the beach’s old wooden boardwalk.

118 E 15th St
New York,
NY
US

"How good can a soft pretzel be?"

That's the question one Serious Eats writer set out to answer in 2009, venturing to then-newly-opened Sigmund's Pretzels for the first time. The spot's warm, twisty snacks, crafted daily by lawyer-turned-pastry chef Lina Kulchinsky, inspired an enthusiastic answer: the "plain, simply seasoned pretzels" fulfilled "all my wanton pretzel desires." Today, Kulchinsky continues to woo palates with her soft and pillowy pretzel twists, but has also expanded Sigmund's Pretzels into a full-fledged gastropub with pretzel-bunned sandwiches, gourmet small plates, and craft beer.

In the Press

  • East Village Vibe: "These pretzels are freaking fantastic."
  • Daily Candy: Kulchinsky "elevates the rustic carb to new heights by offering pretzel sandwiches, tongue-twisting flavors. . . and free house-made sauces."
  • NewYork.com named Sigmund's pretzel buns, which bookend reuben sandwiches and juicy burgers, some of the best in the city.

Sweet, Savory, and Everything In Between

Kulchinsky has mastered classic pretzel preparations that use caraway or simple sea salt for seasoning, but she's also known for more imaginative flavors. Here are a few you might encounter at Sigmund's.

Truffle Cheddar Cinnamon Raisin
The bite of golden cheddar cheese makes a knockout pairing with the velvety umami of the truffles. This soft, perfectly sweet pretzel makes it easy to understand why one East Village Vibe contributor wrote that "Sigmund?s pretzels really might be better than bagels."
Parsley-Garlic Feta-Olive
Italian parsley and fresh garlic cloves impart a lightly herbal flavor to these twisted treats. The fresh, piquant flavors add a Mediterranean twist to pretzels made with feta cheese and olives.

29 Ave. B
New York,
NY
US