Steakhouses in Jersey City

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In the curtained-off dining areas of MarkJoseph Steakhouse, where patrons slice into Zagat-lauded morsels of prime dry-aged porterhouse, a “wall of fame” shows celebrities from Celine Dion to ¬Sopranos cast members grinning with their pleasure in MarkJoseph’s hearty, gourmet menu. Wine racks stripe the steakhouse’s earth-toned walls waiting patiently to add their rich bouquets to patron’s meals of artfully prepared beef or coral-hued lobsters accented with perfectly acidic lemon wedges. So beloved is the spot’s celebrity-approved cuisine that the steakhouse sells bottles of its own signature steak sauce, ready to assist home cooks.

261 Water St
New York,
NY
US

Several years after Joe Moreno opened Broadway Joe Steakhouse in 1949, it was featured in the Jimmy Stewart movie The FBI Story. The first of many films and TV shows to be shot in the restaurant, it set off a chain reaction that would soon have actors and cultural luminaries not just filming scenes there but dining on its hearty Italian dishes and steaks. In the kitchen, cooks prepare many of the pillars of Italian cuisine—chicken parmigiana, veal marsala, and linguine with clams. Diners can sink teeth into salmon fillets or a wide selection of steaks, from cuts of rib eye, filet mignon, and sirloin to 50-ounce porterhouses for two that are so big they served as body doubles for Jimmy Stewart.

315 W 46th St
New York,
NY
US

Shula?s Steak House romances diners with opulent white linens, cherry-wood walls, and football-themed d?cor, replete with photos of famous athletes in gold-plated frames. The restaurant?s appetizers, salads, and sides feature 3- to 5-pound Maine lobsters, oysters, and vegetables, satisfying those eaters who stray from meatier fare. All steaks served by Shula?s must meet eight meticulously defined criteria?marbling, maturity, consistency, leanness, flavor, appearance, and tenderness?before advancing to the next round of a steak-selection reality show. Legendary NFL coach Don Shula?s name marks restaurants across the country, signifying the utmost dedication to quality beef.

270 W 43rd St
New York,
NY
US

At The Capital Grille, cooking the perfect steak requires a serious time commitment: 14–21 days as a matter of fact. The restaurant's butchers cut porterhouses, New York strips, rib eyes, and filet mignons by hand before dry-aging the steaks in temperature- and humidity-controlled rooms for as long as three weeks. To preserve tenderness, the chefs then sear the steaks in an infrared boiler, which forms an eye-catching crust along the edges without sacrificing the toothsome texture of from the steak whether its requested rare or well-done. By taking responsibility for virtually every step of the process from butchering to aging, The Capital Grille's chefs feel comfortable featuring steaks on almost every page of the menu. Although the steaks garner the most attention, the chefs demonstrate a similar commitment to the oft-overlooked details of other dishes. A simple caprese salad uses as many as 14 varieties of tomatoes depending on the season and batches of mozzarella that are freshly hand-made every two hours. Seafood dishes round out the rest of the menu; and although they lack the robustness of a sizzling porterhouse, they echo the same sense of refinement. Tomato-fennel relish adds a refreshing brightness to cedar plank-smoked salmon and broiled Atlantic lobster exudes a decadently rich sweetness. Tasked with assembling a wine list to complement the hearty surf and turf menus of The Capital Grille locations across the United States, Master Sommelier George Miliotes assembled a master list of more than 350 wines. The list includes perennial favorites along with little-known gems. It highlights domestic producers from California and the Pacific Northwest, as well as international wines from France, Chile, and beyond. Even with cellars as vast as those at The Capital Grille's locations, accessibility is the most important factor. Wine menus simply break the selection down by varietal and country of origin, and staff members eagerly recommend pairing suggestions when prompted. The Wall Street location's dining areas stretch across multiple rooms, although each space shares a similar sense of stately refinement. Virtually every room features deep wooden tones, burgundy-hued walls, and eye-catching octagonal lighting fixtures. Small touches do differentiate the spaces though, including subtle accents such as the painted landscapes and portraits lining the walls. The restaurantincludes even more impressive set pieces, such as the doorway that resembles a massive bank vault and the magic 8-ball that tells you your future.

155 E 42nd St
New York,
NY
US

You won’t find a more centralized location for Manhattan tourists to bed down than The Manhattan at Times Square on 7th Avenue. This is prime real estate, tucked into the middle of everything New York City has to offer. From the art deco wonder of Rockefeller Center to the dazzling shows at Radio City Music Hall, The Manhattan at Times Square is close to it all, bringing Broadway theater and the never-ending energy of New York City right to its front door. The lobby acts as the hotel’s hub, where guests can use available computers to conduct business, or simply lounge before heading out for the day. Above, some 689 guest rooms come complete with flat-screen televisions, work areas, complimentary bath accessories, tea and coffee makers and Internet access options.

790 7th Avenue
New York,
NY
US

Diners are so pleased to be at Sammy's Roumanian Steakhouse that they can barely contain themselves. It's common for meals at this kitschy Eastern European joint to break out into singalongs and dancing, which are always accompanied by the Yiddish folk music and lounge standards of a live performer. When guests aren't dancing the hora, they settle down for old-school Jewish cooking that includes broiled chicken livers and massive beef tenderloins. They can even top their steaks with schmaltz—rendered chicken fat that sits in a glass container on each table like maple syrup at a pancake house. Unsurprisingly, spirits flow freely; bottles of Ketel One arrive frozen in ice blocks that make it hard for greedy party members to smuggle them out in their hats.

157 Chrystie Street
New York,
NY
US