Sightseeing in Kansas City

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Rekindle childhood memories as you walk through the National Toy and Miniature Museum. This 38-room Italianate mansion turned museum holds an impressive toy collection with over 300,000 items. The museum is from the combine collections of lifelong friends and collectors, Barbara Hall Marshall and Mary Harris Francis. As one of the world’s largest private collection of toys and miniatures, this museum welcomes over 25,000 guests each year. Walk into this open mansion and view the world’s largest marble collection or peek into one of the antique miniature doll houses. Explore the other rooms that feature collections of miniature paintings, lovable teddy bears, and much more.

5235 Oak St
Kansas City,
MO
US

This duo of history-rich houses showcase antebellum architectural styles, while providing insight into the mores of the era. With four tour tickets total, the historically inclined can visit each house twice or bring a friend along for each visit, while family memberships net unlimited entries for the nuclear unit, along with advance invites to special society-only events. A Greek revival-style home from 1858, the John Wornall House beckons history lovers in to watch costumed reenactors living in the past, where they play period-specific video games while drinking period-specific Mountain Dew. Regular special events at the house include paranormal investigations by local ghost hunters and recreations of the house’s past as a Civil War hospital. Dogs can sprint across the lush grounds while their two-legged companions waft in luscious scents from the herb garden, which contains a variety of delicate plants used in medicines and recipes.

8201 State Line Rd
Kansas City,
MO
US

Kansas City pit-masters are a bit like wizards: with dashes of sauce and wisps of wood-smoke, they summon barbecue aficionados from across the world. But tourists aren't the only ones who hunger for their savory-sweet brisket, ribs, and burnt ends??locals do, too. Bethanie Schemel, owner of KC Barbecue Tours, gives both locals and travelers insider's access to the rich history??and deep flavor??of the city's smoked-meat scene through bus-guided food tours.

On these tours, groups visit famed barbecue hot-spots. They also make stops at beneath-the-radar barbecue joints. "We do have a couple smaller places on our tour that we tend to keep a secret because they are the hidden gems that not a lot of people know about," owner Bethanie Schemel told KCTV 5 News. Food isn't the only reason for booking a spot on one of KC Barbecue Tours' expeditions?participants also get a peek at behind-the-scenes preparation techniques, and can ask pit-masters for tips on what type of wood chips to use or how to build a xylophone from leftover rib bones.

1205 E 85th St.
Kansas City,
MO
US

Kansas City Fun Tours visit upwards of 17 locations on every 75-minute tour of the city. Hopefully, among the mix of museums, tourist attractions, architectural sites, and shopping plazas, there will be three or four places that visitors can't wait to explore on their own. That's the challenge—and the reward—of discovering a new city, and Kansas City Fun Tours makes it so sightseers don't have to resort to any truck-stop crystal balls to show them the way.

If the company's primary mission is to convey the lay of the land, its second job is to make the excursions as fun and comfortable as possible. For each tour, passengers hop aboard classic red-and-green trolleys, which are old-fashioned in every way save the air conditioning, cushioned seats, and sound system. As the trolley rolls along, charming guides narrate the entire journey, illuminating the history of Kansas City with facts and local anecdotes that you couldn't hope to find just by digging up the time capsules at a local park.

30 W Pershing Rd
Kansas City,
MO
US

Founded in 1990, the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum is a privately funded, non-profit organization dedicated to preserving the rich history of African-American Baseball. Experience a tour of multi-media displays, museum store, hundreds of photographs, and artifacts dating from the late 1800s through the 1960s.

1616 E 18th St
Kansas City,
MO
US

Grabbing the top spot in CityVoter’s 2009 Best Museum poll, The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art serves as Kansas City’s intersection of art, culture, and history. Boasting more than 33,500 pieces and art objects, the museum’s vast collections are organized by period, geography, and medium and feature everything from photographs to sculpture to haunted portraits with eyes that follow visitors around the room. Rotating exhibitions encourage return visits, like a sentient boomerang that grabs your hand and refuses to let go. The current exhibit, Solitary: Alienation in Modern Life, explains away loneliness with works from artists including Henri Matisse, Otto Dix, and Paul Klee, who moonlighted as a self-help guru and was the first to posit that men and women may be space aliens hailing from separate planets. This Saturday, the museum opens two new exhibitions, Through African Eyes: The European in African Art, 1500 to Present and Romancing the West: Alfred Jacob Miller in the Bank of America Collection, which members get to see for free.

4525 Oak St
Kansas City,
MO
US