Movies in Keansburg

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East Brunswick Luxury Cinemas 13 mans more than 200 screens from the Midwest to the West Coast. In each theater, digital projectors enthrall audience members seated in comfy stadium-style chairs with vivid images, and surround-sound speakers crisply broadcast every roar of an engine in hot pursuit and every romantic slurp of soda. To make the cinematic experience maximally cushy, guests at many locations also can sink into luxury leather seating and chew thoughtfully on East Brunswick Luxury Cinemas 13's signature $1 hot dogs.

755 Highway 18
East Brunswick,
NJ
US

The Kent Theatre in Flatbush isn't just a movie theater—it's a movie star. A fixture in the neighborhood for many decades, the space was a favorite hangout of a teenage Woody Allen in the 1950s. Perhaps that was the reason he chose the Kent when scouting locations for The Purple Rose of Cairo, his paean to the early, less spaceship-filled days of cinema. The movie house still retains its vintage charm today, welcoming patrons with dramaturgical masks on its marquee and new releases on its three screens.

1168 Coney Island Ave
Brooklyn,
NY
US

With an American flag hanging from its brick façade and its name scrawled in red cursive atop an old-fashioned marquee, The Pavilion Theater looks like it sprung from the screen of a 1950s film. But in reality, it stands right in the middle of Brooklyn. The two-story neighborhood picture house combines both of these worlds, whisking away audiences to another era with its quaint charm and sepia ushers while staying current with a rotating roster of newly released films.

188 Prospect Park W
Brooklyn,
NY
US

Alpine Cinemas eight theaters make current movies come alive as massive screens merge with Dolby Digital sound to keep each crowd of 200 or more immersed in the action. The signature theater injects even more realism with roomy stadium seats and 3-D capabilities that add an extra dimension without having to bring a 20-foot friend to act out the movie. Before shows, guests can stock up on refreshments at the snack bar equipped with savory popcorn and bubbly soda.

6817 5th Ave
Brooklyn,
NY
US

Based in the West Village, Film Forum is an autonomous non-profit cinema house that has the wonderful distinction of being open for more than four decades. The theater’s three screens run a variety of American independent features and foreign art films every day of the year, and curates in-house film festivals, documentary showings and retrospectives as well. These special events often bring writers, directors, filmmakers and authors to the stage for lectures and Q & A sessions, which can render the fewer than 200-seat spaces a bit cramped at times. But for the cinematically passionate, Film Forum remains a mecca of quality film screenings and rare archival showings, all run by a core group of buffs and hobbyists who truly enjoy the work they do.

209 W Houston St
New York,
NY
US

Located in a former fire station, this cinema in Greenwich Village is the neighborhood’s longest running. Since 1963, Cinema Village has survived on a steady diet of art-house and indie programming, which has included documentaries, animation, cult classics, foreign films and festival screenings. Now decked out for the digital era, the three screens continue to play to audiences of up to 156 inside the tight, spartan theaters. But the lack of creature comforts matters little to the dedicated patrons who come for the shows they can’t get anywhere else in the city. And should you arrive too early to grab a seat, waiting space is always available in the small, dim downstairs lounge.

22 E 12th St
New York,
NY
US