Steakhouses in Kingston

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Two longtime residents, nurse Audrey Hochroth and her husband, contractor Sal Barone, grew weary of traversing the bridge to Manhattan whenever they wanted a good steak. So in 2009, they opened Augie’s Prime Cut—a local place their neighbors could go for delicious steak-house fare, such as slow-roasted prime rib, dry-aged porterhouse steaks cut by hand, and fresh lobster plucked from the tank, without driving to the city or kidnapping a steak-house chef. Audrey recently told the Examiner News that so many customers flock to Augie’s Prime Cut on the weekends that they had to open a new 18-table area upstairs—Augie's Loft—to avoid turning people away.

3436 Lexington Ave
Mohegan Lake,
NY
US

John Gogas first became a chef in Greece, eventually traveling throughout Europe helping to establish Club Med kitchens. He relocated to the United States in the 1970s, where he opened Jordan's Restaurant and developed a menu focused in Italian cuisine. Entrees include fettuccine debosco with ham, mushrooms, and peas, as well as baked ziti and veal marsala. Groups can share one of six specialty pizzas, such as a clams casino with bacon, garlic, and a choice of sauce. Of course, there are also a few Greek dishes: pitas can be stuffed with pork, beef, chicken, or pages from Aristotle's rejected film scripts.

900 Main St S
Southbury,
CT
US

Each day, McGuire's chefs seek out seasonal vegetables and greens from local vendors to pair with their high-quality cuts of beef, fresh seafood, free-range organic chicken, and rich, saucy pastas. They then get to work preparing a champagne mignonette for oysters on the half shell, drizzling truffle honey on cheese plates, grilling Maine lobster tails to place in the risotto, and cooking Himalayan red rice to pair with the Chilean sea bass.

The restaurant's stately stone-and-brick building is nestled in the heart of Albany's Center Square district, a short walk away from the New York State Capitol building and mere steps from crowds of confused tourists who thought the capital was in Manhattan. On clear days and balmy nights, patrons dine al fresco on the sidewalk seating that wraps around the corner of State and Lark streets, enjoying their meals and fine wine as they watch scenes of city life unfold around them.

353 State St.
Albany,
NY
US

The classics reign supreme at Blackstones Steakhouse: a traditional restaurant devoted to special-occasion combinations of quality surf and turf. Inside the kitchen, cooks grill prime, dry-aged beef in a number of different cuts, ranging from a petite filet mignon to a porterhouse that can feed as many as four people. The steakhouse's chefs also fill the raw bar with oysters and clams on the half shell, and steam Maine lobsters over a pot of boiling iceberg shards.

Much like the menu, the steakhouse?s d?cor demonstrates a commitment to classical elegance and refinement. Walnut-hued wainscoting, earthenware floor tiles, and wine-red walls add a warm richness to the space. At the same time, stark white tables appear pristine in their simplicity, presenting diners with crisp napkins, crystal-clear wine glasses, and gleaming silverware.

213 E Main St
Mount Kisco,
NY
US

The chefs at O'Hana Japanese Steakhouse & Sushi Bar expertly roll dozens of sushi specialties and sizzle meat-centric Japanese entrees atop a hibachi grill. Snag a seat at the bar to watch chefs chop, slice, and wrap the popular Snow Crab Heaven roll, a blend of cream cheese, snow crab, and avocado topped with spicy mayo ($11.95), and other specialty rolls on the menu. Bite into the Hottie Susan’s molten core of spicy tuna, cucumber, and salmon ($12.95), or let daring chopsticks challenge the Dragon ($9.95), a California roll packed with eel and a deep-seated grudge against questing knights. Alternately, chefs can flip fiery portions of steak, chicken, shrimp, or scallops on a traditional Japanese grill to yield four types of hibachi dinners ($12.99–$17.99 each) flanked by onion soup, a house salad, grilled vegetables, and rice. Kid-friendly options, including pint-sized portions of teriyaki chicken ($8.99) and steak ($9.99), keep young mouths busy so they don’t shout out parents’ computer passwords in the middle of dinner.

874 Lakewood Road
Waterbury,
CT
US

Twenty-eight days. That's the minimum amount of time that Benjamin Steakhouse's Prime beef spends dry aging in handcrafted boxes. This allows the flavors to become densely concentrated before the steaks ever see the surface of a grill. To ensure that every cut meets his high standards, chef Arturo McLeod personally visits meat markets to select the steak house's beef.

Menu at a Glance

Steaks Seafood
Six different cuts are available, including everything from filet mignon to 36-ounce porterhouses. Decadent chilean sea bass and 4-pound lobsters prove that steaks aren't the only luxury food.
Starters Selection of Other Meats
Fresh oysters and littleneck clams on the half shell can help prime palates. Racks of lamb and roasted organic chicken also tempt taste buds.

A Peek Inside

To complement McLeod?s indulgent, upscale New American cuisine, Benjamin Steakhouse's ambiance exudes stately elegance. Leather chairs flank the tables, all of which are dressed with crisp white linens. Chandeliers spread a soft, warm glow throughout the space, gleaming against the rich wood accents.

610 W Hartsdale Rd
White Plains,
NY
US