BBQ Restaurants in Lahaina

Select Local Merchants

From the bustling streets of Times Square to the equally vivacious streets of Hong Kong, people walk around with smiles after enjoying the japanese barbecue cuisine at Gyu-Kaku. The restaurant has more than 700 locations worldwide, each rooted in the belief that some of the strongest bonds between friends are forged at the dinner table. Groups dine on a huge variety of Japanese dishes, from popular meat and veggie dishes such as Harami Skirt Steak, Kalbi Short Rib, and Mushroom Medley - to unique Japanese-American appetizers such as the Spicy Tuna Volcano, Pork Gyoza Dumplings, and Chicken Karaage. The real excitement takes place around individual grills, however, where diners can barbecue their own slabs of filet mignon, grilled ahi tuna, or chicken with basil sauce until they are ideally tender or encircled by on-duty firemen.

1221 Kapiolani Blvd
Honolulu,
HI
US

Tenyaku's menu abounds in yakiniku and shabu-shabu, two closely intertwined styles of traditional Japanese cooking. Yakiniku is a shared social meal, ordered one or two bites at a time, so that tantalized tongues can sample a smorgasbord of savory fare, including teriyaki chicken ($5.95), premium Kobe beef short ribs ($19.50), grilled pork belly ($5.95), and Korean-style octopus ($6.50). Shabu-shabu, or Japanese hot pot, also treats groups of gourmands to a cornucopia of thinly sliced meats, veggies, and supplemental dipping sauces. Where yakiniku metes out customer-selected bites, shabu-shabu unleashes a colossal cavalcade of the chef’s choosing, complete with a tabletop pot to cook it in. At Tenyaku, shabu-shabu comes in three varieties: beef ($19.95), seafood ($24.95), and beef and seafood ($23.95), but any order should contain enough variety to placate the persnickety and to ensure the meal’s genetic line adapts to evolutionary changes. Diners can also select one of Tenyaku's many Korean options, such as the fiery pork kimchi ($9.50) or the traditional Korean bulgogi, with sweetly savory marinated beef ($14.95).

1108 Keeaumoku St
Honolulu,
HI
US

Hiroshi's is a Yakiniku restaurant that serves the highest quality meat you can get on the island. All of our meat is shipped by plane and is never frozen. Hiroshi's only likes to serve the best products so that our customers will have the best experience possible. Our service is also something we are very proud of.

339 Royal Hawaiian Ave
Honolulu,
HI
US

A little corner of Mississippi stands in southeast Inglewood. An unassuming space on Crenshaw hosts M&M Soul Food, which recreates a huge menu of southern favorites from 8 a.m. through dinnertime seven days a week. Chefs load up plates with meatloaf, smothered pork chops, barbecue ribs, and fried seafood, among other soul-food staples. Then, of course, there are the sides—three of them per dinner plate, not counting the plump corn muffins. The menu also incorporates many dishes that can be hard to find outside a southern grandma's kitchen, such as liver and onions, chitterlings, ox tail, turkey wings, and oyster loaf. Cakes, cobblers, banana pudding, and potato pie obliterate the danger that someone might accidentally walk out with a little belly space left empty. In addition to standard combinations of grits, pancakes, and omelettes, breakfast hours hold out less-common dishes such as eggs with catfish or smoked beef links.

3040 Waialae Ave
Honolulu,
HI
US

Sports FanAddicts' culinary crew prepares a hearty spread of sports-watching favorites, strewn with island-inspired accents. Ravenous steak knives sink into 12-ounce ($15) or 16-ounce ($23) rib-eye steaks or pork chops ($15) with Indian curry ($2) or mushroom-and-onion ($2) adornments. Chicken katsu ($12) reaps ear-pleasing crunch from its Asian muse: a thin coating of panko breadcrumbs. The watering hole also fills mouths with a classic pub-style selection of 12-inch pizzas ($10–$16) and Angus beef burgers ($9–$13).

1208 Kona St
Honolulu,
HI
US

Koala Moa is a family-run business that has been dizzying birds with rotisserie-style rotations since 1989. Chicken dinners come hot off the spit prepared with a recipe developed over years of practice and countless tithes to Viking poultry gods. The menu caters to stomach pits of all depths with four different plate choices. Whole ($9) and half chickens ($5) are available on their own, and the whole-chicken plate ($12), large plate ($7), and mini plate ($5) serve the bird alongside scoops of sautéed corn and rice. Additionally, Koala Moa serves its sides on the side, giving sidelong glances to patrons who can’t get enough rice ($1) or corn ($1). Adding a tasty spin not born on the rotisserie grill, the restaurant also whips up house kimchi and takuan.

755 N Nimitz Hwy
Honolulu,
HI
US