Museums in Lake Station

One-Year Family or Individual Membership to The Oriental Institute (Up to 53% Off)

The Oriental Institute

University of Chicago

Exhibit-opening invitations, free audio tours, research-library privileges, and program discounts at a museum of Middle East archaeology

$75 $35

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One-Year Membership to DuSable Museum of African American History (50% Off). Four Options Available.

DuSable Museum of African American History

Washington Park

Examine tales and artifacts of African American history with studies of African nations, murals, and even an animatronic Harold Washington

$60 $30

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Admission for Two or 1-Year Individual or Family Membership at International Museum of Surgical Science (50% Off)

International Museum of Surgical Science

Near North Side

More than 600 art pieces and 7,000 medical artifacts—including a working iron lung—trace the advancement of surgery throughout history

$30 $15

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Visit for One, Two, or Four to the Chicago History Museum (Up to 48% Off)

Chicago History Museum

Lincoln Park

Chicago museum brings history to life with 22 million artifacts & topical exhibits, including a look at railroad workers during WWI

$14 $8

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General, Family, or Friend Sponsor Annual Membership to the APR Pullman Porter Museum (50% Off)

APR Pullman Porter Museum

Far South Chicago

Museum celebrates the victories of the nation’s first African-American labor unions and the history of African-American railroad workers

$50 $25

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Visit for Two or Four, or Individual or Family Membership to Museum of Broadcast Communications (Up to 50% Off)

Museum of Broadcast Communications

Near North Side

Artifacts and digitized recordings detail the history of radio and television; interactive station lets visitors anchor their own newscasts

$24 $12

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Admission for 2 or 4, or One- or Two-Year Family Membership to Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum (Up to 50% Off)

Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum

Lincoln Park

Nature museum hosts living and educational exhibits on the natural world including a butterfly haven and a native prairie.

$18 $11

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Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center Membership for a Family or Individual (Up to 40% Off)

Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center

Skokie

The museum honors Holocaust victims, telling their stories with artifacts and interactive exhibits that urge visitors to fight intolerance

$40 $25

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Single-Day Admission for Two or Four or Family Membership at the Joliet Area Historical Museum (Up to 51% Off)

Joliet Area Historical Museum

Joliet

History museum mines the past of the town of Joliet, its people, and how their stories relate to the whole of American history

$12 $6

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Historic spacecraft, fragments of far away worlds, and maps of the galaxy make outer space seem completely within reach. That's the magic of the Adler Planetarium. From the moment visitors pass through the Clark Family Welcome Gallery?a portal of aluminum tubing, fabric, and video projections?they embark on a journey through space, time, and imagination.

  • Eye Catcher: Earth's neighbors and one massive yellow Sun hang overhead in Our Solar System, which also includes a fragment of a meteorite and a replica of the Mars rover. The Adler is the only place where visitors can touch a piece of the Moon, Mars, and three different asteroids under one roof.
  • Permanent Mainstay: The Historic Atwood Sphere, Chicago's oldest planetarium, where guests can step under a steel dome to view the night sky as it appeared in 1913 thanks to 692 drilled holes.
  • Hands-On Experiments: In The Universe: A Walk Through Space and Time, you can send yourself digital postcards from across the Universe; it'll only take four hours for one to arrive from Neptune, but be prepared to wait 2.5 million years for one to arrive from the Andromeda galaxy.
  • Hidden Gem: The Space Visualization Lab introduces guests to cutting-edge research that astronomers discuss with visitors one-on-one to convey the vastness of space or the size of the castle they want to build on the Moon.
  • Don't Miss: The live planetarium show, Destination Solar System, blends a sci-fi plot with real science as it journeys to Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn's moon Titan.
  • Special Programs: Every third Thursday of the month, Adler After Dark lets amateur astronomers 21 and older spend the evening gazing at the stars with cocktails in hand.

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Stargazing Tips from an Adler Astronomer

Get the most out of your stargazing gear with these tips.
The Adler?s New Show Takes You on a (Practically) Real Tour of the Solar System

How an Adler Planetarium scientist and "Lalaloopsy" TV writer propelled their audience across the solar system.
1300 S Lake Shore Dr.
Chicago,
IL
US

Today, millions of people live and thrive among the streets and skyscrapers of Chicago, but at one time the bustling metropolis had only one resident?namely, the city's apocryphal, somewhat legendary founder, Jean Baptist Point DuSable. A Haitian of French and African descent, DuSable was the first of Chicago's great African Americans, a company that includes the city's first black mayor, Harold Washington. In one of the DuSable Museum's standing exhibits, the Thomas Miller mosaics, portraits of DuSable and Washington peer out along with eight of the founding members of the museum?a constellation of lodestars reminding visitors to maintain Chicago's diverse heritage.

While the mosaics incorporate the museum's own story, other exhibits examine African American achievements of all kinds. Red, White, Blue & Black, for instance, examines the contributions of black men and women in the armed forces. In A Slow Walk to Greatness: The Harold Washington Story, visitors explore the nuances of the momentous campaign through memorabilia and more than 150 mayoral artifacts. An animatronic likeness of Mayor Washington himself even steps in to relay stories and first-hand accounts made possible by animatronic robots' ability to travel through time. In addition to the permanent exhibits, the museum also hosts musical performance, film festivals, and book signings that introduce members to more aspects of African American history, including the scholars who continue to uncover it.

740 E 56th Pl.
Chicago,
IL
US

The Chicago Academy of Sciences created a library and collection of flora and fauna specimens that burnt in the Great Chicago Fire in 1871, just 14 years after its inception. By 1894, the academy had regrouped and rebuilt its collection in Lincoln Park, where it stood for more than 100 years. In 1999, the academy turned it into the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, a family-friendly museum filled with exhibits that let visitors explore the flora, fauna, and ecology of the Great Lakes region.

The 6.35-acre campus hosts more than 15,000 plants, 13,000 birds, and 22,000 amphibians and reptiles in its specimen collections. As visitors walk through, popular attractions include the Judy Istock Butterfly Haven, where visitors can stand in a swirl of 1,000 exotic butterflies, and Mysteries of the Marsh and the Istock Family Look-in Lab, which feature dozens of living creatures, such as turtles, snakes, and giant bugs. The Rainforest Adventure area allows families to encounter live animals and participate in interactive activities.

In addition to educating the public, the museum is a local leader in wildlife conservation. It's nestled in acres of restored prairie, where visitors can spot migratory birds and other native critters and plants. Outdoor exhibits include 17,000 square feet of green roofs, a restored-prairie nature trail, and a rooftop birdwalk.

2430 N Cannon Dr.
Chicago,
IL
US

The Art Institute of Chicago was founded as both a museum and school for the fine arts in 1879, a critical era in the history of Chicago as civic energies were devoted to rebuilding the metropolis that had been destroyed by the Great Fire of 1871. Its first collections consisting primarily of plaster casts, the Art Institute found its permanent home in 1893, when it moved into a building, constructed jointly with the city of Chicago for the World's Columbian Exposition, at the intersection of Michigan Avenue and Adams Street. That building, its entry flanked by the two famous bronze lions, remains the "front door" of the museum even today. In keeping with the academic origins of the institution, a research library was constructed in 1901; eight major expansions for gallery and administrative space have followed, with the latest being the Modern Wing, which opened in 2009. The permanent collection has grown from plaster casts to nearly 300,000 works of art in fields ranging from Chinese bronzes to contemporary design and from textiles to installation art. Together, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the museum of the Art Institute of Chicago are now internationally recognized as two of the leading fine-arts institutions in the United States.

111 S Michigan Ave
Chicago,
IL
US

When entrepreneur Harold Pierce opened the first Harold’s Chicken Shack on Chicago’s South Side in 1950, his chefs fried chicken as it was ordered, filling customers' empty hands with baskets of fresh, piping-hot chicken in 12–15 minutes. Today, the chain of 62 restaurants peppered across the Midwest and Southwest continues the old tradition of rewarding patience with astonishingly delicious chicken. The long-standing shop specializes in a simple order—breaded chicken fried in a rich mix of vegetable oil and beef tallow for a home-cooked flavor. Chefs prep the chicken Chicago style by pouring a dash of sauce over the basket, which soaks into the white bread and crinkle fries that come with every order. Marked with the famed emblem of a cook chasing a chicken with a hatchet, the restaurant has saturated the city’s consciousness, earning a mention in Tucker Max’s I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell, an appearance in Kanye West’s music video Through the Wire, and its own chicken hologram projected over the skyline. Serious Eats sums up citywide sentiment for the chain: "When the words 'fried chicken' are uttered in Chicago, it’s a fair bet that the name Harold’s Chicken Shack will usually follow."

1134 W Washington Blvd
Chicago,
IL
US

Founded in 1982 with the mission of spreading an understanding of war's impact on the lives of soldiers, the National Veterans Art Museum showcases more than 2,000 works of art created by more than 255 veterans. The museum's oeuvre, which comprises paintings, photography, sculpture, and music, focuses on Vietnam but includes artwork inspired by all of America's wars. In addition to keep a permanent collection, the museum hosts rotating temporary exhibits that honor and remember veterans and keep the subject matter fresh. Visitors and members enjoy an active social calendar, stocked with events that feature live music and plays performed entirely with the NATO phonetic alphabet.

1801 S Indiana Ave
Chicago,
IL
US

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