Thai Restaurants in Round Mountain

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Locally and family owned, Non La serves traditional Vietnamese cuisine along with a variety of Asian soups, appetizers, sushi, and entrees. Although similar to both Chinese and Thai cuisine, Vietnamese cuisine is cooked using very little fat, making it a healthy yet delicious option for fans of health and deliciousness. Non La's menu features a variety of authentic selections, including traditional Vietnamese egg rolls (two for $3), fried shrimp rolls (four for $7), and lemongrass stir fry, which is served with either chicken, pork, beef, or shrimp and with onions, chili peppers, and lemongrass ($8–$10). Pair a caterpillar or rainbow roll ($9 each) with a pot of fresh health-giving Tam Chau Oolong tea ($7/pot) for a formidable combo of foreign fare. Other favorites include sesame chicken ($9), beef and broccoli ($9), and a number of vegetarian options such as tofu pad thai ($9).

2121 Lohmans Crossing Rd
Austin,
TX
US

The chefs at Kerbey Lane Cafe have spent decades combining locally sourced ingredients to craft a menu brimming with eclectic breakfast fare, Mexican-tinged entrees, and rotating seasonal dishes served all day long. Batter craftsmen flip stacks of Kerbey Lane's signature homemade pancakes ($2.99–$5.39), dressed up in a full wardrobe of adventurous flavors including gingerbread, apple whole wheat, vegan, and crushed velvet. The SoLa enchiladas pack tortillas with portobello mushrooms, spinach, and cheddar-jack cheese under a downpour of your choice of sauce ($7.99). Groups can scoop through an appetizer of the Kerbey queso ($8.09)—guacamole blanketed with queso and pico de gallo and served with tortilla chips for dipping and flinging at open-mouthed dinner dates.

13435 N Highway 183
Austin,
TX
US

Open an Asian-American dialogue with the guidance of a wide-ranging menu and the goodwill of taste-bud ambassadors. Start off with an order of spicy Thai Dynamite shrimp served over Asian slaw (S $5.49, L $8.99) or potstickers—dumplings filled with pork, green cabbage, scallions, and ginger and served with a citrus soy dip (S $3.99, L $6.99). Rice dishes and noodle bowls, such as Spicy General Fu and Pad Thai, are priced by main star, with chicken, beef, or tofu for $8.29, shrimp for $9.29, or veggies for $7.29. After selecting a hunger weapon, dive into the eastern seas of flavor with a wok-sizzled order of fried rice, which includes bean sprouts, scallions, carrots, egg, chopped broccoli, and brown sauce, or a spice-tastic Singapore noodle bowl with rice noodles tossed in a spicy yellow curry with carrots, onions, scallions, celery, garlic, and basil. A gluten-free menu and two special seared entrees are also available: seared ahi tuna steak, encrusted in sesame and served over a bed of sautéed spinach ($14.99), and flat- iron steak, marinated in a red-wine soy sauce and served on a bed of red bell peppers, mushrooms, and green and yellow onions ($12.99).

11301 Lakeline Blvd
Austin,
TX
US

When the shutters pop up from the side of its rustic trailer, Trai Mai Thai’s kitchen is ready to transport diners to Thailand. The business's owner and head chef, Ning Kongla, purportedly impressed her boyfriend so much with her cooking that he convinced her to pursue it as a career. With that, Trai Mai Thai was born. There, she stuffs crab rangoon with blue crab from the Gulf to prelude the thai soups, dumplings, and noodle dishes that populate a menu that “reeks of authenticity," according to Austin Monthly. Picnic tables and other food trailers populate the sunny area—dubbed the South Lamar Trailer Bazaar—where the sounds of live music drown out the sound of fancy white tablecloths picketing on the street.

3600 S Lamar Boulevard
Austin,
Texas
US

Satay's cooks fuse a variety of Asian cuisines, serving Thai specialties alongside sushi and fried rice. Patrons are encouraged to partake in the restaurant's BYOB policy, which stands for "bring your owl's binky," lest it disturb other customers with its endless hooting.

3202 W Anderson Ln
Austin,
TX
US

From the elegant and elephant-arted confines of their new Southaven restaurant, Bangkok Alley’s Thara and Dottie Burana keep the fresh fish swimming into their lunch and dinner dishes, where they morph into schools of sushi and Thai concoctions both creative and traditional. Starters such as the shrimp hompa—which envelops its shrimp with golden-fried panko and sweet-and-sour sauce ($6)—irrigate parched mouth-deserts to create an inviting climate for the seafood keow han, a mélange of shrimp, scallops, and the fish of the day served in green curry with basil sauce ($20). Otherwise, silence the howls of were-stomachs with heartier fare such as a grilled strip steak and panang sauce served with grilled asparagus and squash ($20), or a panang curry underscored with a coconut base and garnished with chopped Kaffir lime leaf (up to $14 with choice of protein).

909 W Mary St
Austin,
TX
US