Shopping in Lansing

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Modern Skate & Surf?s alternative-sports shop was founded in 1979 and has since hosted events frequented by Olympic and professional athletes?including superstar Tony Hawk?as well as earned a feature as Best Snowboard Shop in 2012 from Real Detroit Weekly. In Modern Skate Park's world-class, 60,000-square-foot Royal Oak skate park?one of the largest facilities of its kind in the US?skateboards grind across rails or glide over jumps, and inline skaters whiz over obstacles and BMX bikes hang in midair. Customers can build on their extreme-sports skills in clinics and lessons or rent out the facility for parties or high-speed chases. Committed to supporting the next generation of extreme athletes, Modern Skate Park offers discounts to students who bring in report cards sporting A?s and B?s.

In addition to the skate park, Modern Skate & Surf also maintains a East Lansing store that stocks snowboarding, skateboarding, wakeboarding, skating, and protective gear to facilitate exciting adventures.

326 Morgan Ln
Lansing,
MI
US

Since 1825, the Old Town area has seen both prosperous times and, for the second half of the 20th century, stretches of destitution. Within the last 30 years, dedicated locals have started turning Old Town back around, dropping its building vacancy rates from 90% to fewer than 10%, and establishing a slew of festivals, art venues, and boutiques. The Old Town Commercial Association plays its role in this cultural and economic renaissance by holding the annual Old Town Oktoberfest, a Midwestern interpretation of the traditional German holiday.

Over the course of two days, live polka bands provide a soundtrack for German-style dancing and festivities. Vendors pour German and European Oktoberfest beers from Spaten, Warsteiner, and Frankenmuth, and autumnal beers from American breweries such as Sam Adams and Blue Moon. Local restaurants serve authentic German dishes such as spaetzle, potato soup, frankfurters, and bratwurst throughout the fest, allowing visitors to taste the country’s staples without having to stow away in a UN ambassador’s suitcase.

1220 E Grand River Ave
Lansing,
MI
US

An ever-changing landscape of foliage occupies The Plant Professionals's facility, which spans three acres and boasts 18-feet-tall ceilings that tower over everything from the budding pastel blossoms of spring to the pine needles and poinsettias of winter. The company specializes in commercial indoor and outdoor landscape installations, but it also keeps a landscape designer on staff, available by appointment.

Other gardening professionals on staff include interior-plant designers who can artistically arrange interior plantscapes for businesses; resident florist Dave Mansfield, who—informed by more than 50 years of experience—crafts floral arrangements for any occasion; and elves disguised as interior decorators, who arrange wreaths and other home accents for the snow-capped holidays. The Plant Professionals even has a grow-pot exchange on site, which allows patrons to recycle their old planters and pick up new ones for free.

16886 Turner Street
Lansing,
MI
US

The knowledgeable staff at BetterHealth Market helps visitors to navigate a vast inventory of products for natural and nutritious living ranging from aromatherapy oils to gluten-free cookies. Natural, organic, and raw groceries from brands such as Amy's Kitchen and Nature's Path keep home cooking flavorful and wholesome, and a range of supplements, vitamins, and minerals helps to ease health issues, increase energy, or incinerate burritos that have overstayed their welcome. A wide variety of teas and coffees offers options such as fair-trade beans and yerba mate to healthfully wash down each nourishing morsel. Customers can peruse the prepared foods department, which includes salad bars, fresh raw juices, all natural smoothies, specialty sandwiches, and salads.

6235 W Saginaw Hwy
Lansing,
MI
US

Since its first issue hit newsstands in 1917, Michigan History magazine's readership has turned to the periodical's six annual issues for an illuminating peek into the state's past. Today, 23,500 subscribers thumb through the bimonthly?s 64 eye-catching pages, perusing long features, colorful illustrations, and coverage of history-based books and events that trace Michiganders? impact on their communities, country, and fellow global citizens. Recent issues have profiled architect Darius Moon of Lansing and detailed the Munising Woodenware Company which produced high-quality wood products, now considered collectible. Now run by the Historical Society of Michigan, the magazine also preserves its own past by curating issues from its first six years on Google Books, rather than burying them in time capsules throughout the state.

5815 Executive Dr
Lansing,
MI
US

Since its first issue hit newsstands in 1917, Michigan History magazine's readership has turned to the periodical's six annual issues for an illuminating peek into the state's past. Today, 23,500 subscribers thumb through the bimonthly?s 64 eye-catching pages, perusing long features, colorful illustrations, and coverage of history-based books and events that trace Michiganders? impact on their communities, country, and fellow global citizens. Recent issues have profiled architect Darius Moon of Lansing and detailed the Munising Woodenware Company which produced high-quality wood products, now considered collectible. Now run by the Historical Society of Michigan, the magazine also preserves its own past by curating issues from its first six years on Google Books, rather than burying them in time capsules throughout the state.

1305 Abbot Rd
East Lansing,
MI
US