Sushi in Downtown

Select Local Merchants

The practiced chefs at Red Sushi assemble sushi, sashimi, and nigiri platters alongside savory Asian entrees in a crimson-lit, contemporary dining room. Diners can nab 1 of 11 specialty rolls betwixt nimble chopsticks or out-of-work Oreo halves, such as the Red Tiger roll, which caps shrimp tempura with spicy tuna and avocado ($16). The Dynamite roll bedecks a standard california roll with sizzling supplements of scallops and fiery dynamite sauce ($10). Soak tongues in sweet miso accompanied by black cod ($22), or joust with brussels sprouts to determine how to divvy up an Asian-style game hen ($19). Wine by the glass, as well as Japanese sake and beer selections, stifle thirst symptoms, whereas signature cocktails like the Red Zen Tini—a tart blend of vodka, pomegranate, and sweet-and-sour citrus ($9)—rouse taste buds.

300 S 4th St
Las Vegas,
NV
US

Owner and chef Masa spent nearly two decades as a sushi chef?most of that time inside Hyakumi Japanese Restaurant, Nobu, and Bacchanal Buffet at Caesars Palace?and while he could easily roll his own maki at home, he couldn't find a fast-food Japanese restaurant close to his house. So he opened his own eatery, Ninja Teriyaki & Sushi 2 Go, as explained in a Las Vegas Review-Journal feature. The restaurant's traditional and inventive sushi rolls?varying from salmon avocado to spicy tuna to shrimp tempura?complement rice bowls brimming with chicken and tofu slathered in teriyaki sauce. And as the restaurant?s name implies, can be taken ?2 Go? or enjoyed at the eatery, where the family dog can't negotiate his way into getting the last bite.

3025 E Desert Inn Rd., Suite B15
Las Vegas,
NV
US

At Kinsei, style meets tradition as a model-esque wait staff fills tables with fresh sushi and succulent seafood pastas amid occasional live entertainment. Playfully named dishes bear exotic ingredients such as quail eggs, pressed pork belly, and yuzu, a citrus fruit capable of curing insomnia when eaten in one’s sleep. Kinsei also celebrates Japanese kabuki performance and invokes the dance form’s colorful makeup via a kaleidoscopic array of sashimi and sushi rolls stacked with fresh salmon, jalapeño, and green onion.

3949 S Maryland Pkwy
Las Vegas,
NV
US

Located just a five minute drive from the Vegas Strip and a short stroll from UNLV, this casual Japanese restaurant tucked away in a small Maryland Parkway strip mall has been serving fresh fish to Las Vegas since 1999. At Yama Sushi, a wide variety of nigiri and traditional and specialty sushi rolls are offered, crafted from fish that is flown in regularly. Sitting at the well-worn sushi bar offers the added benefit of interacting with and ordering directly from the chef. Those that love sushi (in both quality and quantity) will appreciate the all-you-can-eat options, which include sushi, appetizers and ice cream, and are offered for both lunch and dinner. Or, tuck into a two-top table for a more relaxing meal, partially shaded by Japanese paper screens.

1350 E Flamingo Rd
Las Vegas,
NV
US

In 1971, Jimmy Nishiyama introduced the city of Las Vegas to Japanese hibachi cuisine. Three decades later, and the friends have stayed very much in touch. During that time, Geisha House, Nishiyama's brainchild, has grown to fill three locations and eight menu pages. Colorful specialty sushi rolls, such as the baked Japanese Lasagna?cream cheese and mayo atop a crabmeat and avocado roll?make fitting partners for grilled lobster, filet mignon, or scallops in hibachi dinners. Nearly 30 varieties of sake trip merrily across the palate, while the Geisha martini blends sake with plum wine and a treasure trove of James Bond jokes.

3751 E Desert Inn Rd
Las Vegas,
NV
US

Teriyaki's chefs whip up fresh Japanese and Chinese fare, uniting the two cuisines on a menu loaded with meat, seafood, and vegetarian options. Like high schoolers with handlebar moustaches, the house-special tofu ($6.95) wears a badge of honor as a chef's specialty. Japanese bowls amalgamate steaming-hot ingredients to create flavorful varieties such as the teriyaki chicken ($3.79), which comes doused in teriyaki sauce concocted from a recipe that is—just like grandpa’s coal-burning microwave—more than 50 years old. Moist steamed or fried rice accompanies spicy mongolian beef ($8.50), and the shrimp with lobster sauce ($8.50) offers nourishment culled from the sea that’s much tastier than a peanut-butter and jellyfish sandwich.

4161 S Eastern Ave
Las Vegas,
NV
US