Movies in Lebanon

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Without transcendent classical music, Nashville's top cultural event would be a polka band performing a 58-minute "Yakety Sax" jam session instead of today's Groupon to the Nashville Symphony. For $30, you get one ticket to see Thibaudet Returns at the Schermerhorn Symphony Center. Concerts take place on Thursday, April 1, at 7 p.m. and April 2 and 3 at 8 p.m. All seating is in the $75 orchestra level.

1 Symphony Pl
Nashville,
TN
US

Even though it opened in 2006, Schermerhorn Symphony Center looks like it's been a part of the landscape for centuries. That's because the center, which is named for Nashville Symphony's late maestro Kenneth Schermerhorn, took its design cues from famed European concert halls. Its classic appearance is enhanced by 30 soundproof windows, which allow natural sunlight or unnatural spaceship lights to stream in. A custom-built organ rings out through the hall, and a convertible seating design allows the hall to morph into a ballroom floor for cabaret shows or weddings.

1 Symphony Pl.
Nashville,
TN
US

Groupon holders will be seated in the theater’s center section, but seats are not assigned until the house is opened for seating on the evening of the performance.

400 River St
Chattanooga,
TN
US

Closing out Lamplighter's "A Place to Belong" season, the comedic play Leaving Iowa tells the story of a family packing their bags and hitting the open road on a vacation undermined by haphazard hilarity. With the same enthusiasm he used to pilot the theater’s productions of My Fair Lady, Pride and Prejudice, and Guys and Dolls, seasoned director Greg Wilson leads the cast as they act out the trials and tribulations of spending quality time with the family. Relatable, sentimental moments abound while the kids vie for control of the back seat, the dad points out uninteresting landmarks, and the mother attempts to keep the peace and rouse everyone's spirits.

14119 Old Nashville Highway
Smyrna,
TN
US

The Redneck Comedy Bus Tour delivers a two-hour dose of Southern-tinged humor aboard a refashioned camouflaged school bus. Decked out in their respective getups of denim overalls and fluorescent cake makeup, hosts Tater and Erlene corral their fearless chortle trippers at either the World Famous Nashville Palace (Mondays–Thursdays and Saturdays at 11 a.m.) or the Whiskey Bent Saloon (Mondays and Saturdays at 2 p.m.). Passengers learn about the haunts of Nashville's overabundant country stars and local yokels directly from the denizens themselves, who speak in their native hillbilly pidgin. Coolers the size of tackle boxes containing six-packs are welcome, and tourists are encouraged to bring their own canned alcohol, beef jerky, pork rinds, or vegan bubble gum. After proving proficiency on the subject of goo goos and moon pies, riders are deemed redneck certified and should possess a newfound ability to recite poems about NASCAR.

2611 McGavock Pike
Nashville,
TN
US

Established in 1855, the Tennessee State Fair's long history includes more than thrilling Midway rides and food on sticks; the festival also features a yearly theme around which events and exhibits center. This year, the fair's theme is "Let the Good Times Grow," an idea embodying the fair's fiscal growth and the locally-grown entertainments it houses. The Taste of Tennessee event, for instance, gathers chefs who craft native cuisines, local bands, and area craft brewers.

The grounds also showcase a range of entertaining shows, from beauty pageants and pig races to dogs performing gravity-defying tricks to catch frisbees. Plus, the Kenya Safari Acrobats return for the 7th year to show off their incredible agility. Should younger visitors feel inspired to step on stage themselves, they can enter the kids' ice cream eating contest; a winner's trophy goes to the kid whose mouth can shovel the most ice cream and whose brain can withstand the worst ice cream headache.

500 Wedgewood Avenue
Nashville,
TN
US