Seafood Restaurants in Liberty

Select Local Merchants

Crispy on the outside, flaky on the inside?the skillfully deep-fried fish at City Fish and More have kept customers coming back for more than 30 years. Fillets of catfish, tilapia, and basa, battered and breaded with special seasoning, arrive at tables alongside traditional Southern sides. Following in the footsteps of his quality-conscious grandfather, who opened the first fish market in Kansas City, Kansas, in 1938, owner Pete Badalucco only sources the freshest seafood and crinkle-cut fries with exactly 16 ridges.

2704 State Ave
Kansas City,
KS
US

"A computer can't understand a handshake," says Jack Schwindler, explaining why he retired after 32 years as a food broker. He missed the face-to-face aspect of the business, which diminished as technology swiftly advanced. So when he and his wife found a defunct marina on Lake Lotawana, where Jack spent his childhood, he found his calling. In 1993, Jack and his wife opened Marina Grog & Galley, and now, Jack says, "I'm shaking hands again."

Marina Grog and Galley is run by a tight-knit crew of longtime employees, including servers who have worked there since 1996. Their menu boasts dry-aged steaks from a local purveyor and fresh fish flown in from Hawaii three times a week. The smell of steaks searing over mesquite charcoal drifts out to the front driveway, creating an aroma that attracts passersby and envious traveling steak peddlers. Other specialties include baby-back ribs crafted from a recipe Jack penned when he was 21 years old, and a range of fried, boiled, and stuffed shrimp.

Every night, Jack visits with guests at the tables arranged around the dining room, which look out at the lake or a 1,500-gallon saltwater tank that houses a 48-foot living reef. Leather seats in cobalt blue comfort backs, and stone fireplaces warm the stone walls and light wood around the restaurant. Outdoor tables along the water seat up to 150 people, and on-deck fireplaces keep diners comfortable. "Something happens every night in the restaurant business," says Jack, and he doesn't want to miss a minute of it.

22 A St
Lake Lotawana,
MO
US

As the doors to Gaslight Grill's back room swing open, the sounds of Dixeland jazz and the aromas of sizzling Angus steaks waltz forward together to greet guests. Lynn Zimmer and the Jazz Band play rollicking tunes from the 30s and 40s on Wednesday?Sunday nights as diners tap their fingers across the surfaces of menus filled with hand-cut steaks, pistachio-crusted salmon, and jumbo prawns drizzled in beurre blanc. More than 200 wines complement meats from land and sea, and a nimble barkeep dishes out mixed drinks and jetpack fuel for the ride home. It might be difficult to say goodbye, however, to a stately dining room lined with plush booths and illuminated by twin chandeliers.

5020 W 137th St
Leawood,
KS
US

Armed with a culinary education from Le Cordon Bleu in Paris, Chef John Westerhaus uses classical techniques and international flavors to create refined American cuisine. His inspiration stems from a deep love for the simple menus of Parisian sidewalk cafés. For starters, a chipotle-spiked hollandaise sauce blankets a plate of smoked salmon and corn cakes, and garlic-ginger dipping sauce graces lobster spring rolls. For entrees, the restaurant's chefs demonstrate their mastery of traditional American cuisine by grilling rib eyes, Kansas City–style strip steaks, and trout fillets over a pile of smoldering baseballs.

Purple booths and napkins add a splash of color to the dining room's gently lit earth tones. Stone walls divide the dining area from the kitchen, and two walls of floor-to-ceiling windows separate the restaurant from the outside world. To keep things lively indoors, the restaurant hosts live performances by local musicians Wednesday–Sunday, serenading diners with cool jazz and gentle R&B melodies.

11942 Roe Ave
Overland Park,
KS
US

Known for growing cotton and soybeans, many farms in the South known now nurture a new crop?catfish. Converting their fields to ponds, farmers raise the whiskered fish on an all-grain diet to develop meat with a clean, slightly sweet taste and reduced cholesterol. Every filet at Jumpin' Catfish Restaurant comes from this stock, which the chefs prepare in various ways: breaded and fried in the Southern tradition, marinated in lemon and pepper, or dusted with cajun spices, like the mayor of New Orleans after their morning bath. They then pair the plump, juicy filets with sides such as hushpuppies and white beans with ham.

The chefs extend their culinary skills to other seafood as well, from Norwegian salmon to Alaskan snow-crab legs. They also work with wild game such as quail and frog legs, and prepare Southern fare, such as fried chicken.

834 SW Blue Pkwy
Lees Summit,
MO
US

At Cork & Brew, a dark wooden wine bar pops against the backdrop of white walls and heavy red drapes. It’s a fitting centerpiece for a restaurant that focuses on libations—bartenders pour more than 40 wines and recruit beers from local brewers such as Boulevard Brewing Company, Weston Brewing Company, and Doodle Brewing Company. They also add shots of house-infused vodka to martinis, which dining companions can sip on the restaurant’s private outdoor patio. Despite a focus on spirits, Cork & Brew doesn’t shirk cuisine. Chefs recruit local produce and meats from providers such as Bichelmeyer Meats, Fabulous Fish, and Farm to Market Bread Company and incorporate them into thick burgers, grilled fish, and still-life paintings.

8 E Franklin St
Liberty,
MO
US