Clubs in Lockhart

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Founded by a posse of Kentucky-area natives, Trifecta On 3rd distinguishes itself with an enormous bourbon selection and a gourmet bar menu heavy on specialty pizzas. These house pies include the Southwestern chorizo, made with fresh, golden corn and cilantro, and the Fireball, which scalds mouths with jalapeños, serranos, habaneros, and, when in season, the notoriously nuclear Ghost Chili. Between bites, patrons can escape to Trifecta's expansive patio lest their ear-steam obstruct others' view of the interior's seven flat-screen TVs.

360 Nueces St, Ste 30
Austin,
TX
US

801 W 5th St
Austin,
TX
US

The Cigar Room offers patrons a welcoming locale to peruse a wide range of slow-burning smokes while enjoying a cozy atmosphere. Nestled in the heart of Lakeway, The Cigar Room boasts an inviting lounge tailor-made for winding down and a walk-in humidor that showcases a constantly expanding selection of quality cigars. Visitors will be able to make a selection from 21 varieties of Torres Cigars, which range from $5–$20 per cigar. Containing masterfully crafted blends with a Texas twist, Torres Cigars provide smokers an opportunity to sample top-notch tobacco in a striking package. Additionally, patrons can kick back and relax next to the bar, where a selection of wines and beers await to wet the smoke-parched whistles of distinguished smokers and budding connoisseurs alike. Use today’s side deal as an excuse to bond with any and all paternal units this Father’s Day while effortlessly puffing on The Cigar Room’s soothing coronas and torpedoes.

1310 Ranch Road 620 S
Lakeway,
TX
US

Kenneth Threadgill stood in line all night to be the first person in Travis County to get a beer license. It was 1933, and the bootlegger and country-music connoisseur had plans to evolve his filling station into something bigger—though even Threadgill probably couldn't have anticipated how big it would become.

It started with touring musicians stopping in for drinks after their shows. By the ’60s, Janis Joplin was on stage, polishing her unpolished sound for crowds from all walks of life. The evolution continued, with Threadgill's hosting artists from Jerry Lee Lewis to Captain Beefheart and expanding into a Southern-style restaurant where the love of music ironed out disagreements and engendered an atmosphere of tolerance.

Today, the original location on North Lamar harks back to Threadgill's beginnings, with current owner Eddie Wilson decking the place out with decor that evokes the Austin of the 1930s to the 1960s, including vintage signs that say, “I can’t wait for the internet to be invented.” The second location on West Riverside celebrates the 1970s music scene that thrived at the Armadillo—Wilson's former establishment at that location. At both venues, chefs churn out classic Southern food, such as chicken-fried steak and fried green tomatoes, while frequent live music entertains guests.

301 W Riverside Dr
Austin,
TX
US

Designed by legendary movie-house architect John Eberson and opened to the public as a vaudeville palace in 1915, the venue enjoyed performances by the likes of Harry Blackstone and Katharine Hepburn in its heyday. But things fell into decline during the 1960s as televisions became commonplace, more people migrated to the suburbs, and the stage’s trapdoor spontaneously grew fangs. The Paramount’s multi-tiered seating and historic ceiling murals languished in the theater’s years to follow as a tragically underused B-movie cinema.

In 1973, three men—John M. Bernardoni, Charles Eckerman, and Stephen L. Scott—formed a corporation with the ultimate goal of rescuing the Paramount, by that time slated for destruction. Soon, live performers were regularly supplementing a classed-up movie schedule, and the stage was graced by such artists as Dave Brubeck and Debbie Allen. The theater’s star rose ever higher in the ‘80s and ‘90s as the curtains introduced the world to such lasting works as The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas and the Greater Tuna series. Today, the lovingly built and rebuilt artifact is a constant reminder of Austin’s long history of arts appreciation.

713 Congress Ave
Austin,
TX
US

Although Esther's Follies' variety show of music, magic, and comedy recalls the vaudevillian entertainment of yesteryear (albeit with a more acerbic modern bent), the nostalgia goes beyond just the performances. The longstanding venue and comedy troupe was named after Esther Williams, the Golden Age starlet whose career as a professional swimmer led to numerous iconic MGM films. Posters for several of these pictures are plastered throughout the space, and an undersea mural bustling with brightly-hued coral, kaleidoscopic marine life, and even a Loch Ness monster further contributes to Esther's otherworldly, aquatic theme. The magical environment, along with the shows themselves, have wowed audiences and Austin Chronicle critics alike.

On the production end, Esther's Follies busts guts in record speed with satirical quips on current events; relevant parodies; and high-stepping, fast-paced comedy sketches. Resident magician Ray Anderson keeps things light with levitation illusions known to dazzle crowds. As the Follies cast ignites into choral skewerings of front-page newsmakers, audiences will laugh so hard that giggles come out their noses.

525 E 6th St
Austin,
TX
US