Sightseeing in Long Beach

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FrameStore's craftsmen have created more than 250,000 custom frames in the store’s 35-year tenure, designing pieces that now adorn the walls of prestigious institutions such as the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Ritz-Carlton, and the Walt Disney Company. Professional designers guide FrameStore’s clients through the 2,200 moulding options that can accent paintings and treasured items while adding style and elegance to rooms. The store’s craftsmen then fashion pieces to patron specifications, outfitting frames with classic or museum-quality glass that blocks UV rays from bleaching out images or censoring pictures of the moon. Every piece goes through a 16-point inspection before it is given to patrons, and the team averages a seven-day turnaround on all of its projects.

6451 E Pacific Coast Hwy
Long Beach,
CA
US

Soft lighting and tastefully modern music welcome guests to The Wine Bar, a comfortable library of libation where patrons pleasurably peruse wines, beers, and shrunken plates. Twenty-two wines from around the world gather to test tongues with grapey glugs of Fat Cat's 2008 pinot grigio and Parone's Chilean syrah (all bottles are $30). The Wine Bar's one score and five beers include a multitude of bottled options, such as North Coast Brewing Co.'s Old Rasputin—a cassock-black, Russian-style stout infused with complex flavors, 75 IBUs, 9% ABV, and imperviousness to bullets ($6)—or drafts such as Paulaner's German hefeweizen. Because the stomach cannot digest liquid without accompanying solids, customers can snack on assorted cheeses with olives and crackers ($10) or traditional hummus with a heated pita ($8).

250 W Ocean Blvd
Long Beach,
CA
US

Rancho Los Alamitos enjoys a spot on the National Register of Historic Places for a couple reasons—the site is the birthplace of the native Tongva people, and it has also played an important role in local history since 1790. That’s the year Manuel Nieto took control of a 300,000-acre parcel of land as a reward for serving the Spanish crown on an expedition to California. Over the years, the land saw subdivision—in 1833, it was divvied up among Nieto’s heirs into five ranchos, some 25,500 acres becoming Rancho Los Alamitos. Around this time, the Nietos erected a still standing adobe house, most likely for ranch staff and horses. Fast-forward nearly a hundred years and Florence Bixby is cultivating a lush garden. From native plants and cacti to geraniums and roses, her garden incorporated aspects of ranch life without fully relinquishing a European vibe. Along with that garden, vestiges of the Tongva Village and the homestead’s former inhabitants live on today next to a renovated Rancho Center and Barns Area. The ranch is still home to barnyard animals—chickens, rabbits, horses—and thanks to Bixby’s heirs, the 7.5 remaining acres of Nieto’s once-colossal estate now welcome the public with exhibits about its history and that of the Tongva tribe.

6400 E Bixby Hill Rd
Long Beach,
CA
US

Rubber Duck Tours traverses both the blue and green portions of the globe to offer guests an amphibious exploration of Long Beach. With this tour, passengers will climb inside The Duck, a hydra-terra vehicle approved by the U.S. Coast Guard for dual-purpose travel. The tour route begins with an exploration of downtown Long Beach, as the tour guide shares the story of Long Beach's rags-to-boats transformation from farming community to port city. From there, The Duck hits the water to glide along the glassy surface of the harbor, with the elevated design of the boat keeping passengers dry, much to the delight of wicked witches and sightseeing housecats. The aqua-portion of the tour includes buoy's-eye views of the Queen Mary and other ships populating the harbor. The tour lasts 1.25 hours, with one-third of the tour spent on the water and two-thirds of the tour spent on land.

Shoreline Dr. and Pine Ave.
Long Beach,
CA
US

PIEAM houses a huge assortment of ethnic art from all over Melanesia, Polynesia, Micronesia, and Hypernesia. The museum was founded by the late medical doctor and Oceania enthusiast Robert Gumbiner, who wanted to preserve the various sculptures, paintings, jewelry, carvings, and tools forged by Pacific Islanders. Tour the facility for a day with a friend, significant other, or sentient shadow or opt for an ultimate membership, which gets two adults and any kids or grandkids under 18 a full year of access to the museum's chambers, as well as eight guest passes, a complimentary copy of The Birds of Yap, and recognition as a founding member in PIEAM promo materials. Click here for current and upcoming exhibitions.

695 Alamitos Ave
Long Beach,
CA
US

Aquarium of the Pacific

Betty’s favorite foods are shrimp, clams, and squid. She’s a little over a year old. She has brown hair, and her nickname is “Banshee,” because she wails when she doesn’t get her way. Named for Aquarium of the Pacific sponsor and legendary actress Betty White, she’s a recent addition to the aquarium’s BP Sea Otter Habitat. Betty was discovered in early 2012, a mere pup, without a mother. The staff at Aquarium of the Pacific nursed her back to health until October, when she was well enough to join her friends in the otter habitat. The otter habitat is just one of 19 habitats at Aquarium of the Pacific, which also includes 32 focus exhibits celebrating the diverse wildlife of the Pacific Ocean. In the June Keyes Penguin Habitat, more than 12 tuxedo-clad Magellanic penguins waddle around a rocky beach where guests can spy them nesting, eating, and practicing dance routines with Dick van Dyke, and a crawl space below their swimming pool provides a closer look at the birds as they go for a dip. Outside in Shark Lagoon, some 150-plus sand tiger, zebra, and whitetip reef sharks bare their menacing grins. But in the shallow touch pools, gentle bamboo and epaulette sharks discredit stereotypes by allowing visitors to pet them. For those more interested in the science of the sea, the Ocean Science Center helps visitors explore oceanic trends through its Science on a Sphere exhibit. The globe, a creation of the National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration, measures six feet in diameter and displays films about subjects such as rising sea levels and the connection between ocean health and human health.

100 Aquarium Way
Long Beach,
CA
US