Thai Restaurants in Los Alamos

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At Pho Bar, chefs master the spicy, savory flavors of the Vietnamese soup called pho with an authentic touch. The menu boasts large bowls of pho with filet mignon, beef meatballs, chicken, and more. Each bowl is served with bean sprouts, basil, cilantro, sliced jalapeño, and lime on the side, so guests can customize the steamy entree. Alongside the genuine Vietnamese tastes of pho are plates of grilled meats, rice-paper-wrapped spring rolls, tofu and veggie soups, and banh mi, a Vietnamese–style sandwich served on a flaky 12-inch french baguette with fresh cilantro, cucumber, and carrots. To complement each dish, the restaurant serves beer and wine.:m]]At Pho Bar, chefs master the spicy, savory flavors of the Vietnamese soup called pho with an authentic touch. The menu boasts large bowls of pho with filet mignon, beef meatballs, chicken, and more. Each bowl is served with bean sprouts, basil, cilantro, sliced jalapeño, and lime on the side, so guests can customize the steamy entree. Alongside the genuine Vietnamese tastes of pho are plates of grilled meats, rice-paper-wrapped spring rolls, tofu and veggie soups, and banh mi, a Vietnamese–style sandwich served on a flaky 12-inch french baguette with fresh cilantro, cucumber, and carrots. To complement each dish, the restaurant serves beer and wine.

3301 Southern Blvd SE
Rio Rancho,
NM
US

Steam drifts from the hot kitchen, where the family moves swiftly amid pots that clamor metallically for attention. It is 1942 in the Sichuan province of China, and the cooks are working together in the new restaurant, Chow’s, to perfect the recipes and earn money for their family. Today, three generations later and on the other side of the world, Chow’s Asian Bistro fills with the spicy bouquet of scents that still hint at those same recipes, which have taken on influences from other culinary traditions over time. Chicken, beef, shrimp, and tofu steep in coconut-curry or kung pao sauce and twist among garlic-festooned sprays of broccoli. Additionally, pad thai, lo mein, and chow fun dishes call chopsticks into action like an orchestra conductor whose luggage is missing.

10000 Coors Bypass Northwest
Albuquerque,
NM
US

Pacific Paradise merges the flavors of the Far East and the Pacific Islands into an extensive and far-reaching lunch and dinner menu. Placate palates with the spicy Thai eggplant ($6.95 for lunch, $8.50 for dinner), tenderly sliced Mongolian beef ($8.50 for lunch, $11.95 for dinner), vegetable tempura ($7.95 for lunch, $9.95 for dinner), or Pacific Paradise's signature seafood-rice pizza ($15.50), a smattering of the sea stir-fried with jasmine rice, egg, and pineapple, all baked and served with soup and a salad. The Malaysian sautéed scallops ($8.95 for lunch, $13.95 for dinner), finished off with mushrooms and coated in a curry coconut sauce, will have taste buds rising up and high-fiving each other in victory, while the Hawaiian golden crisp chicken ($8.50 for lunch, $10.95 for dinner) evokes nostalgic memories of the decade you spent whittling wooden teddy bears on a desert island. Spicy options also abound at Pacific Paradise, with heat-bringing dishes such as the marinated Tibetan lamb kabob ($12.95), the Mongolian beef roll with asparagus ($12.95), and the kung pao tofu ($10.50), which consists of crispy, deep-fried tofu in a spice-laden kung pao sauce. A full sushi menu is available, as is a monsoon’s worth of wine and beer options.

3000 San Pedro Dr NE
Albuquerque,
NM
US

Start your appetite's engine with crispy, chicken-stuffed spring rolls (three for $4.50) or Loog Chin Ping (eight for $5.75), which reinvents the meatball by grilling it and serving it on skewers with peanut sauce. The coconut soup ($4.50 cup, $8.95 bowl) is a Jasmine specialty. Curries are central to the menu of carefully prepared Thai favorites. Try shrimp green curry ($10.95) or pineapple chicken in red curry ($9.25). To venture beyond the curry boundaries, sup on a wok-fried dish such as mango chicken (lean and tender chicken betrothed to tangy mango, $9.50). Moo Tod ($9.95) consists of six pieces of pork tender enough to serve as pillows for gnomes, if dozing gnomes didn't mind being marinated in garlic-pepper sauce.

4320 The 25 Way NE
Albuquerque,
NM
US

Woks soar to high temperatures in the kitchen at Street Food Market, the grab-and-go eatery opened by award-winning chef Tai Tok in the summer of 2013. Chef Tok wanted to offer a quick way for diners to fill their Asian street food cravings, so he serves up to-go dishes such as stir-fried noodles, and other Malay, Thai, and Vietnamese specialties featuring piquant sauces and relishes. And for after meals, fragrant teas, rich coffee drinks, and sweet desserts round out the menu. Customers can enjoy their food on an outdoor patio with wooden benches and colorful shade umbrellas.

2300 Central Avenue Southeast
Albuquerque,
NM
US