Movies in Bel Air

Movie, Soda, and Popcorn for Two or Four at American Cinematheque's Aero Theatre or Egyptian Theatre (Up to 57% Off)

Aero Theatre or Egyptian Theatre

Multiple Locations

Historic cinemas screen festival hits and revivals; upcoming shows include Raging Bull, Jaws, and The Shining

$37 $18

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Horror Movies in the Park for Two at Street Food Cinema (Up to 43% Off). Five Options Available.

Street Food Cinema

Multiple Locations

In the open air of a park surrounded by food trucks, horror fans take in classic flicks projected onto a giant screen

$24 $14

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Shriekfest Horror Film Festival at Raleigh Studios on October 2–5 (Up to 50% Off)

Shriekfest Horror Film Festival

Raleigh Studios

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Four-day fest includes spine-tingling short and feature films from around the world

$140 $70

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Film-Event Admission for Two or Four at Sistah Sinema (50% Off)

Sistah Sinema

Los Angeles

Monthly event showcases films by queer women of color and leads into a safe group discussion of the film and subject

$10 $5

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One-Year Membership for One or Two to NewFilmmakers Los Angeles (Up to 55% Off)

NewFilmmakers Los Angeles

AT&T Center

Non-profit film society showcases documentaries, shorts, and features by talented up-and-coming filmmakers at AT&T Center

$75 $35

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Movie Tickets for One or Two at Warner Grand Theatre (50% Off). Four Options Available.

Grand Vision Foundation

Central San Pedro

Watch American classic rock films in historic art deco theater opened in 1931

$15 $7.50

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Select Local Merchants

The Bel-Air Film Festival shines a bright light on film reels from around the world, offering a diverse schedule of independent shorts, documentaries, and feature-length films. The fest kicks off with My Father's Will, a U.S. feature that centers around a wealthy businessman who, in accordance with his father's last wishes, must distance himself from his affluent identity and hefty bank account for one month of self-discovery, reflection, and, most likely, frozen TV dinners. Starting Thursday, things heat up with four to five showings a day, including The Italian Key from Finland and Trophy Kids from American director Josh Sugarman. Friday and Saturday's festivities conclude with complimentary wine-tasting events before after parties and competitive Kurosawa name-droppings take center stage. Monday wraps up the whole festival with a screening of Face to Face, a film many consider to be the Australian version of 12 Angry Men.

2701 North Sepulveda Boulevard
Los Angeles,
CA
US

The historic Bigfoot Crest Theater celebrates the artistry of Hollywood’s heyday, gifting modern-day audiences with the magical experience of 1940’s movie-going. Shunning cold service, shoddy projection, and chairs stuffed with stale Mike and Ikes, the Bigfoot Crest champions all-encompassing experiences with advanced projection upon one towering 18'x38' screen. The flashing marquee sparkles like a Las Vegas carnival midway to draw widening eyes to their artfully maintained décor, where decorative clouds under the foyer's art-deco ceiling prime viewers for their motion-picture escape. With two tickets, old friends, first dates, and conjoined critics will thrill as they sashay down the shimmering purple carpet to plush red seats, awaiting the ceremonious opening of the curtains before the daily matinee. Two medium drinks and a large popcorn provide a snackful counterpart to cinematic viewings.

1262 Westwood Blvd
Los Angeles,
CA
US

Eat|See|Hear offers an unparalleled outdoor movie experience by screening new and classic films in HD on an inflatable, wrinkle-free projection screen standing 3.5 stories tall and 52 feet wide. Using a 30,000-watt sound system, each venue is custom-calibrated to ensure a decibel-appropriate listening experience for audiences lounging on blankets or in lawn chairs. Local food trucks remain onsite during events to dish out cuisine, and pre-film performances by up-and-coming bands get audiences pumped up and help loosen any cobwebs built up inside the ears.

1350 South Sepulveda Boulevard
Los Angeles,
CA
US

With its single screen and adventurous, tightly-curated film selection, the Nuart Theatre is the go-to screening option for the West Los Angeles cineaste. A part of the Landmark Cinemas chain, the Nuart showcases independent and foreign films, along with special presentations throughout the year, such as the Oscar-nominated live action and animated short films. In addition, Friday and Saturday late nights are reserved for screenings of cult classic films like The Warriors or Purple Rain, among others. A shadowcast of The Rocky Horror Picture Show gets audiences involved, and film fans can continue their love of cinema at home by purchasing one of the many DVDs for sale at the theater’s concession stands. Who knows, you might be able to pick up a copy of the film that’s currently showing.

11272 Santa Monica Blvd
Los Angeles,
CA
US

The lives of six strangers — a lawyer too busy to spend time with his family, a young journalist looking for a career-starting story, a widowed former cop and his mischievous son, a couple with secrets to hide — collide in this dramatic thriller from Academy Award nominated director Henry-Alex Rubin. For the official synopsis of the film, click here.

The cast features Golden-Globe winner Jason Bateman (Identity Thief, Up in the Air), Alexander Skarsgard (True Blood, Melancholia), and Paula Patton (Precious, Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol). Peter Travers of Rolling Stone praised the cast's performances, highlighting Bateman's role as "just tremendous" and Skarsgard's work as simply "outstanding." Richard Roeper of the Chicago Sun-Times gave the film four out of four stars and raved: "Disconnect struck a chord with me in a way few films have in recent years." Newsweek hailed the thriller as "The Best Film of The Year."

9000 Sunset Blvd Ste 600
Los Angeles,
CA
US

At twin cinemas in Hollywood and Santa Monica, American Cinematheque preserves the thrill of classic films and introduces the newest works by modern auteurs. A relic of the glamorous past, the Egyptian Theatre was built in 1922 and inspired by the search for the Valley of the Kings in Egypt. From its first showing of Robin Hood until today, it has operated as a movie house, and now sends 60-foot-wide images and crystalline sound flashing through the ornate mirage of its interior.

Today, the screens' ever-unpredictable and constantly changing lineup can include anything from the lightweight whimsy of Citizen Kane to the modern masterpiece Spaceballs, and frequent festivals focus on themes from world cinema to film noir.

At both cinemas, modern works are often further illuminated by their creators, with events and post-show discussions featuring the directors and actors.

1328 Montana Ave
Santa Monica,
CA
US