Jazz Clubs in Lyons


Select Local Merchants

Only a true icon can name their venue Legends and get away with it. Luckily, famed blues artist Buddy Guy fits the bill. Known as ?the crowned king of Chicago?s electric blues scene,? Buddy has more than 50 years in music notched into his guitar strap, as well as six Grammy Awards and a coveted spot in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. Inside his beloved blues club, Guy can be seen on stage every January during sold out shows, easing into the playful stomp of Muddy Waters? ?Hoochie Coochie Man? and his soulful, woozy solo in ?Stone Crazy.? The performance space holds fans? intrigue with other performances throughout the year and has hosted such renowned musicians as John Mayer, ZZ Top, David Bowie, and Eric Clapton. Seven nights per week, live blues music drifts through the air while guests dine on southern Cajun soul food, from blackened bourbon shrimp to cat fish po? boys and chicken and sausage jambalaya. Music fans can sneak away from their meals to fawn over blues memorabilia such as original artwork, Grammys awards, and guitars signed by B.B. King, Carols Santana, and the late Stevie Ray Vaughan.
700 South Wabash Avenue
Chicago,
IL
US
Equal parts sophisticated seafood restaurant, innovative sushi bar, and down-home oyster joint, Shaw’s Crab House has something for seafood palates of all stripes. The chefs base the expansive menu on what’s in season and available fresh. Dishes might incorporate Lake Michigan whitefish, Atlantic yellowfin tuna, Nantucket Cape scallops, or Alaskan king crab. Just-shucked oysters hit plates in myriad varieties, from Nova Scotia to New Brunswick to Prince Edward Island, and star in the signature Oyster Shooter cocktail—a spicy concoction of an oyster, Absolut Peppar vodka, cocktail sauce, and Tabasco. Shaw’s sushi chef rolls specialty makis, including the Godzilla roll, which combines tempura shrimp, avocado, barbecue eel, smoked salmon, and tobiko and imparts the ability to roar blue flames. He also plates rice-free rolls, such as the spicy lobster roll filled with Maine lobster and avocado. As diners dig in at tables shrouded in crisp white cloths, the dining room plays host to blues-based live music, which fills the space every night of the week.
21 East Hubbard Street
Chicago,
IL
US
The nondescript brick building on a nondescript Hyde Park street corner would be easy to overlook, were it not for the howling blues tunes booming out from within. Past the front hall plastered with press mentions and award clippings, a boisterous crowd of well-dressed locals and wide-eyed college students packs the intimate, rectangular space. They lounge on upholstered vinyl chairs at the floodlit bar, sipping stiff drinks and tapping their feet to the music. Up on the stage stands the source of the infectious melodies—Chicago blues legends like the Mighty World Band and Shorty Mack. The musicians often call for audience participation, when the lively guests unhesitatingly raise their voices to sing along with soulful tunes that earned the joint accolades from the likes of Fodor's and The Travel Channel.
7401 S South Chicago Avenue
Chicago,
IL
US
Founded by an Italian immigrant who was love struck by the blues, Rosa's Lounge gathers minor-key maestros and their fans into a rollicking joint celebrated by Frommer's as "One of the best joints in town for spirited, authentic Chicago blues." Throughout its cozy, low-lit caverns, guests groove to the soulful strains of the guitar, the impassioned wail of the harmonica, and the haunting tinkle of the triangle. Since 1984, performers from a wide spectrum of styles have strode across the stage, from traditional Delta musicians such as Pinetop Perkins and David Honeyboy Edwards to the latter-day Chicago-school folk such as Billy Branch and Sugar Blue.
3420 West Armitage Avenue
Chicago,
IL
US
B.L.U.E.S. on Halsted welcomes lifelong blues aficionados and casual listeners alike to its daily performances primarily by local artists. Sets by groups such as Vance "Guitar" Kelly and the Backstreet Blues Band begin each night at 9:30 p.m., and patrons can linger as late as 3 a.m. to grab more drinks or wait for the band's bass to turn back into a pumpkin. The intimately sized venue clusters all of its tables near the stage, ensuring that the entire audience remains within earshot of the soulfully crooned melodies.
2519 N Halsted St
Chicago,
IL
US
If Green Mill’s walls could talk, they’d probably run out of breath before they could divulge all the stories they’ve witnessed over the years. The jazz spot’s history, which teeters on the edge of believability and local lore, began when the bar originally opened as Pop Morse’s Roadhouse in 1907. After undergoing a transformation in 1910, the newly renamed Green Mill Gardens began attracting visitors from nearby Essanay Studios, including Charlie Chaplin. Perhaps its biggest claim to fame is serving as a hangout for the infamous Al Capone, who frequented the club while his right-hand man, Jack “Machine Gun” McGurn, ran the show. While some of Capone’s favorite performers took the stage, Green Mill’s network of hidden underground tunnels were used by mobsters to transport illegal booze, facilitate law-evasion, and play cruel games of Marco Polo with new recruits. Eventually Prohibition ended and propositioning gangsters gave way to upscale crowds, a badda bing vibe, and Frank Sinatra visits. During this time, the surrounding Uptown neighborhood deteriorated, but somehow the club survived and eventually underwent a restoration in the mid-‘80s. Over the years it has appeared in films such as Thief and High Fidelity, but patrons today aren’t as concerned with keeping track of all the history as they are with kicking back and soaking in the music or slam poetry. During a typical visit, Jazz musicians tickle their instruments late into the night as well-dressed guests stop in, sidle up to the bar, and converse in respectfully hushed voices while downing stiff drinks.
4802 North Broadway
Chicago,
IL
US
Advertisement