Interior Design in Maryville


Select Local Merchants

  • Omaha Drapery Blind and Design
    Omaha Drapery&Blind's interior specialists channel more than 29 years of experience to beautifully enhance customers' privacy with custom window treatments. At each appointment, the window tailors discuss design options with homeowners while going over drapery top treatments and fabrics that best accentuate upholstery, floor coverings, and abstract family portraits. Shutters from brands such as Hunter Douglas pair well with wooden furniture items while also filling specialty window shapes seamlessly. Custom draperies and blinds arrive within three weeks, and shutters arrive within five–eight weeks after being carefully produced by the design team and delivered by bodybuilding storks.
    Read More
    7601 Military Ave
    Omaha, NE US
  • Lovesac
    LoveSac is frequently featured in national and online press such as Us Weekly, Diggnation, and Life & Style.
    Read More
    10000 California Street
    Omaha, NE US
  • Sage and Daisy
    Sage and Daisy is the sweetest soap shop in Kansas City! In addition to our bakery soaps and shea butter soaps, we also have a full line of herbs, herbal teas, and home fragrances.
    Read More
    2450 Grand Blvd
    Kansas City, MO US
  • Great Frame Up
    With thousands of frame and mat samples, The Great Frame Up can satisfy any and all framing fantasies. The expert framespeople can make diplomas radiate (most diplomas can be framed for around $100–$200), personalized jerseys glisten (most for under $300), and dorm-room movie posters sparkle (many 24"x36" pieces for under $100). The design wizards can also find a home for any prized possession, such as shoebox photos, baby booties, ticket stubs, medals, and really good pot roasts. The Great Frame Up’s no-hassle guarantee and assurance that all work is done on-site means your frameables won't be subject to mistreatment at underground commercial-framing facilities.
    Read More
    6325 Lewis Street
    Kansas City, MO US
  • Webster House
    As children practiced their spelling with chalk sticks and inkwells at the Daniel Webster School in the 1880s, they never imagined their notebooks might be replaced with plates of prime rib. But more than a century later, the cupola-topped Romanesque Revival building?now known simply as Webster House?houses a restaurant that loads its tables with just such sumptuous new-American cuisine. The Building Constructed in 1885, Webster House was lovingly restored in 2002. In the second-floor restaurant, dining rooms are bedecked with antique furniture in the style of an English country home. On the floor below, an antiques gallery invites guests to recreate this stately look at home from a selection of 18th- and 19th-century pieces from around the world, including cabinets hewn from Georgian walnut and French fruitwoods. The Menu Though the digs are a throwback, Executive Chef Matt Arnold keeps his bill of fare decidedly modern. Procuring ingredients from a long list of local farms and vendors keeps his menu fresh. At brunch, diners might savor Anson Mills grits with country ham from Burgers Smokehouse; dinner brings dishes like pan-seared loch duart salmon served with caramelized cabbage, butter-poached fingerling potatoes, and bacon from Benton's Hams.
    Read More
    1644 Wyandotte St.
    Kansas City, MO US
  • K C Clay Guild
    In 1988, potter Michael Smith invited a small group of peers to his home to share ideas and further explore the art of clay manipulation. After just a few meetings, the group quickly grew to include around 70 craftspeople, who started meeting at the Kansas City Art Institute instead of inside Smith's giant conch shell. These regular get-togethers laid the groundwork for the initial incarnation of KC Clay Guild, a place where artists could socialize, buy materials in bulk, and learn from one another. Now, the volunteer-run co-op is even larger. It occupies its own facility and has vastly expanded the number of services it provides. Amidst the changes, KC Clay Guild has remained true to its initial goals, guided by a mission statement to support the clay community. Artists of all skill levels enroll in classes that cover an array of techniques, such as wheel throwing, hand building, and slip casting. Members take part in regular meetings, open-studio time, and monthly shows, and visiting artists stop by to lead workshops and repair their ceramic automobiles. The guild even offers a scholarship to high-school seniors and hosts birthday parties, team-building exercises, and family-fun nights for casual potters.
    Read More
    200 W 74th St.
    Kansas City, MO US
Advertisement