Sporting Events in Massachusetts

Select Local Merchants

Hershey Theatre

The Hershey Theatre, conceived in 1933 by noted philanthropist and chocolatier Milton S. Hershey, stands as an opulent tribute to the performing arts. Taking architectural cues from Saint Mark’s Basilica in Venice, the foyer’s towering arches gleam with golden paint and crystal chandeliers. The blue-and-gold mosaic that leads to the main seating area is the masterwork of two German artists who spent two years on its construction. Once inside the theater, audiences might think they’ve stepped onto the streets of Venice thanks to the atmospheric ceiling, stonework facades, and gondoliers paddling them to their seats. ####Bethel Woods Center for the Arts Music has permeated the 800 manicured acres where the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts has stood since 1969, when farmer Max Yasgur agreed to let love, peace, and harmony grow wild at the very first Woodstock festival. These days, the renowned outdoor venue and cultural center continues to attract the biggest acts in music to its pavilion stage. The open-air design ensures ample ventilation on the natural sloping lawn, and a roof protects up to 15,000 fans from inclement weather and the prying eyes of Cessna pilots.

290 Northern Avenue
Boston,
MA
US

  • 16: how many hours it takes to set up The Greatest Show On Earth
  • 10: how many hours it takes to tear it down
  • 2,500: average pounds of popcorn consumed in between
  • 85: the number of animals, which include Asian elephants, tigers, lions, leopards, and llamas; all receive superlative animal care
  • 61: the number of cars in the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey circus train that carries the show from city to city; that?s more than a mile long
  • 20,000: the number of miles that train will cover in one year
  • 3: the miles the train master walks each day as he tends to the animals (all seated at the front of the train for the smoothest ride) and gives them regular water and exercise stops

50 Foster Street
Worcester,
MA
US

The Springfield Armor thrills hometown hoops fans by laying siege to Developmental League opponents with a fully loaded roster of potential NBA stars. Led by head coach Bob MacKinnon Jr., the Armor tips off a fresh season against conference rival Maine Red Claws, returning up to six players from last year's roster. Slam-dunk champion LD Williams dazzles crowds by sinking alley-oops and opposing mascots through the hoop, and points-machine JamesOn Curry, the franchise's all-time leading scorer, seeks to build on 2010's strong performance. As the D-League affiliate of the New Jersey Nets, the Armor grants b-ball enthusiasts the chance to watch future NBA players before they pick-and-roll into the national spotlight or sign million-dollar contracts to join an experimental league inside the heads of Mount Rushmore. Although not included with today's Groupon, MassMutual Center surrounds guests with a variety of attractions, including the Center Grille Restaurant, Breakaway Bar, and a gift shop.

1277 Main Street
Springfield,
MA
US

Founded to commemorate local US veterans, Lowell Memorial Auditorium's imposing, neoclassical exterior is ringed with inscriptions immortalizing famous generals and pivotal battles throughout the years, including Bunker Hill, Gettysburg, and San Juan Hill. The venue's history hasn't been all serious, however?in its early years, shortly after Word War I, its most popular event was the weekly Bingo game, which often attracted up to 3,000 participants and prompted Life to call Lowell a "natural Bingopolis." The decades following saw everything from conventions and civic affairs to performances by Benny Goodman and the Golden Gloves boxing tournament. By 1979 the building was so worn down from floods, hurricanes, and economic depression that it necessitated a major renovation to bring it into the modern era. Today, its stage is fit for Broadway-scale shows, the behind-the-stage balcony is gone, and air conditioning protects against summer heat and litigious snowmen.

50 E Merrimack St.
Lowell,
MA
US

Championships and distinguished alumni are both part of Harvard's 150-year athletic tradition that traces back to a wrestling match between sophomores and freshmen in 1780. Beyond their four NCAA championships in men's hockey, women's lacrosse, women's rowing, and fencing, Harvard has produced 141 national team championships and numerous Olympians who have faced off against elite competition and in almost every time zone. The Harvard Crimson women's tennis program accounts for 18 ivy league championships, laying claim to five of them in the past 12 years.

65 North Harvard Street
Boston,
MA
US

Exercise can be a little tough when you start out. Take inspiration during your next workout by understanding the good it?s doing inside with Groupon?s whirlwind tour of the cardiovascular system.

The Cardiovascular System: How Exercise Makes it Hum

The average person?s heart beats 100,000 times a day, pushing 10 pints of blood all the way to the tips of the toes and back through 60,000 miles of vessels. Along this route, that blood stops to do a great many errands. The heart pumps blood to the lungs to collect oxygen before sending it through the rest of the body via arteries, arterioles, and capillaries. Once the tissues have absorbed the oxygen and nutrients they need, they send the waste-filled blood back to the heart through the veins to be reoxygenated and start the process again.

Every time our heart beats, what we really feel is the opening and closing of valves that push the blood through the heart?s four chambers and out to the body. When we exercise or get scared by a shrub that looked like a huge dog for a second, our brains instruct the heart to beat harder to supply the body with what it needs to fight or run. As exercise enhances the muscles over time, it also improves the function of the entire cardiovascular system.

This happens in several ways. Although exercise makes the heart work harder in the short term, this ultimately causes the body to adapt, easing the heart?s everyday tasks. In response to muscles? demand for more oxygen and compliments, the body actually sprouts new capillaries, while prompting existing capillaries to open wider. These increased channels help lower blood pressure, since blood now encounters less resistance on its way to the extremities. The heart also becomes better at oxygenating the tissues?red blood cells increase their numbers during intense exercise.

With its insistent knocking in our ribcage, you may think the heart?s role in all this would be hard to ignore. But the earliest anatomists didn?t hear its call so clearly. Galen and Hippocrates believed the liver produced blood and spread it through the body in a centrifugal manner; meanwhile, the veins contained air, which the lungs pushed to the tissues. They also assumed this was an open-ended system, with the blood and air gradually dissipating when it reached the ends of veins and arteries?a view that would hold for another 1,500 years.

200 N Dartmouth Mall
Dartmouth,
MA
US