Mexican Restaurants in McAlester

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Compadres Mexican Grill serves handmade authentic Mexican food and drinks in a warm and friendly environment. Once seated at your table, you'll be welcomed by handmade chips and escorted by three different varieties of salsa. The eatery's extensive dinner menu features fresh takes on Mexican favorites. The herculean eight-inch burrito especial comes stuffed with your choice of beans, beef or chicken along with all the fixings ($9.75) for an edible experience as grand and tubular as a rocket launch past the tasty outer stratosphere and straight into the void of deliciousness. The borracho tacos (steak, chicken, or shrimp) ($9.75) and fajitas de la casa (chicken or steak) ($10.79) are freshly grilled to order.

2200 W New Orleans St
Broken Arrow,
OK
US

Sometimes old gems need a polish to restore their sparkle. Chimi's Mexican Food was one such gem. It had been around for nearly a quarter century when Brandon Fischer bought it in 2007. Immediately, according to an interview in Tulsa World, he set about bringing back the luster to his favorite Mexican chain in town. "I can’t think of one thing (on the menu) that isn’t new or hasn’t been tweaked,” he said.

Fajitas loaded with grilled veggies and seafood, as well as tamale pie in crisp tortilla bowls, speak to Brandon's efforts. The more adventurous of taste can even crank their dish's capsaicin level up to 11 by requesting it by served "Diablo style." And if it gets too hot, there's nothing to fear: margaritas wait to extinguish mouth fires and their salt-rimmed glasses ward off bad luck when thrown over the shoulder.

6709 E 81st St
Tulsa,
OK
US

A review of Fiesta Cozumel in Tulsa World recounts how Miguel Geronimo arrived in Tulsa with a tentative grasp of the language and a father known for serenading 51st Street with his miniature guitar. With his dad’s help, Miguel landed a job washing dishes at Senor Tequila, eventually rising through the ranks and teaming up with his wife, Pilar, to open Fiesta Cozumel on Sheridan Road. The pair remodeled the building—the former home of a nondescript fast-food restaurant—into a cozy oasis sporting a full-service bar, flickering TVs, and, according to Tulsa World’s Scott Cherry, “adobe-colored walls” with “sepia photos of old Mexico and colorfully painted platters.” Diners can crush south-of-the-border cravings with a slew of traditional Mexican dishes from sizzling fajitas to grilled tilapia that burst with more authentic Southwestern flavor than a deep-fried bolo tie.

2165 S Sheridan Rd
Tulsa,
OK
US

Pass beneath Andales' neon palm-tree sign and enter into a festive, lively dining room where vibrant decorations and a spirited wait-staff foster a fiesta-like atmosphere. Following traditional recipes that were brought to the United States during the Mexican Revolutionary War, Andales serves a myriad of Tex-Mex classics, concocted with freshly ground spices, hand-cut meat, and crispy vegetables. Sip a specialty beverage such as the peach margarita ($3.99) as you decide on something solid, or take a nonchalant weave through the tables on the outdoor patio to quickly compare an assortment of windblown whiffs before picking out your own plate.

5966 S Yale Ave
Tulsa,
OK
US

The owners and chefs at Santa Fe Cattle rely on old family recipes that demand steaks are aged and cut in-house, rolls are baked fresh each day, and signature sauces are mixed onsite. These touches transform the menu’s casual, regional eats into dishes worthy of John Wayne’s personal dressing-room buffet. Steaks, fajitas, and sliders are plated next to housemade sides of cole slaw, Santa Fe taters, and of course, a bucket of peanuts—which guests shuck directly onto the floor. The peanut shells add character to each one of the restaurant’s 20 locations, which evoke old-west saloons with touches such as brick walls draped in horse saddles and weathered wooden floors.

2401 12th Ave NW
Ardmore,
OK
US

Cooks bustle about the kitchens of Tulio's Mexican Restaurant, stuffing flautas with juicy morsels of skinless white-meat chicken and marinating strips of sirloin steak. The beef soaks in its bath of spices for a full 24 hours before it’s deemed ready for fajitas al carbon and mexican steak-tip dinners, a slow but necessary process that typifies the restaurant’s concern for getting traditional Mexican recipes right.

Though they share certain ingredients in common, there’s no mistaking the difference between a giant burrito—stuffed with up to five pounds of meat or piñata candy—and light entrees such as veggie fajitas with steamed rice and ranchera beans. Whether sautéing peppers or deep-frying chimichangas, the cooks keep an eye on heart health and use only 100% vegetable oil. Fresh produce goes into dishes such as the Cancun chicken, whose sweet bell peppers and guacamole-celery hot sauce make for more green than a bank vault filled with lime jello.

1000 Alameda St
Norman,
OK
US