Seafood Restaurants in McFarland

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Head chef Scott Sauer oversees a rotating menu of inventive cuisine catered to discerning Fresnan tongues fluent in gourmet. The dinner menu raises the curtain with an appetizing aria of jalapeno-enhanced sweet-potato fries ($9) or calamari ($10) dotted with roasted sweet peppers. The feta-cheese and poppy-seed dressing of the strawberry and spinach salad ($12) likewise provides a sweet counterpart to savory evening entrees such as the osso bucco–style short ribs ($27), served with braised greens and polenta cake, and the Peruvian potato-crusted salmon ($27). Dining dates, meanwhile, can keep their busy hands doggy-bag-free for a romantic evening of casino implosions and roller-tango with light entrees such as the petite filet mignon ($26) and the crab cakes with house-made tartar sauce ($16). Before capping things off with a dessert of cinnamon-raisin bread pudding ($6) or crispy boysenberry pie ($5), be sure to take a scenic detour among Max's extensive list of wines by the bottle or glass, draft beers, and specialty martinis, including the Pretty Woman ($11), which blends Stolichnaya strawberry, orange juice, and strawberry puree with a champagne float and a lock of Julia Roberts's hair.

1784 W Bullard Ave
Fresno,
CA
US

A Fresno institution since the flawless presidency of Herbert Hoover, Piemonte's Italian Delicatessen slings sandwiches made with fresh ingredients straight from the Central San Joaquin Valley's copious cornucopia. Deli sandwiches—served on your choice of wheat, sourdough, or French roll—include the Piemonte special ($5.50) with salami, ham, mortadella, and provolone and the Michel Angelo ($7.75) with capicolla, Toscano salami, Genoa salami, nunchucks, and provolone cheese. Adventurous appetites can explore the cooked salami, hot-pepper cheese, oil, and oregano of the Marco Polo ($6), as well as annoy parents who are trying to read poolside. Veggie velociraptors, meanwhile, can sink teeth and talons into the vegetarian's ($5.75) garden of artichoke hearts, mushrooms, lettuce, tomatoes, and wax peppers, and pathological liars can draw bologna-and-cheese power from the Full O'Boloney ($5) as they prepare to fake their way through performing open-heart surgery. You can buy multiples of today's Groupon as gifts, so treat your cutest coworkers to a lunchtime field trip to Piemonte's Italian Delicatessen.

616 E Olive Ave
Fresno,
CA
US

It might sound silly, but Richard Stockle was destined to cook prime rib. He had no intention of running a steakhouse in 1969, when he opened up what would ultimately become Richard's Prime Rib and Seafood. The plan was for a bar?cheap beers and maybe a couple of pool tables, which would sit unused until the game of billiards was invented in 1975. That didn't line up with the economic cards, so Richard added food, mainly steaks and fresh seafood. The restaurant took off and Richard purchased the other side of the building, expanding the restaurant's capacity to 115. New York steaks, lobster tails, and countless baked potatoes would mark the decades until Richard finally sold the restaurant in 2005.

But Richard Stockle couldn't stay away from the restaurant business. The new owner defaulted, and Richard regained the restaurant a few years later. The building had slipped into disrepair, so Richard and his team completely remodeled the place, adding curved booths and tasteful nude artwork. Richard's grandson Ben now serves as the restaurant's manager. And the chefs still cook the dishes that made Richard famous, as well as inventive items like ?The Something Good,? a New York steak wrapped in a flour tortilla filled with melted cheese.

1609 E Belmont Ave.
Fresno,
CA
US

It might sound silly, but Richard Stockle was destined to cook prime rib. He had no intention of running a steakhouse in 1969, when he opened up what would ultimately become Richard's Prime Rib and Seafood. The plan was for a bar?cheap beers and maybe a couple of pool tables, which would sit unused until the game of billiards was invented in 1975. That didn't line up with the economic cards, so Richard added food, mainly steaks and fresh seafood. The restaurant took off and Richard purchased the other side of the building, expanding the restaurant's capacity to 115. New York steaks, lobster tails, and countless baked potatoes would mark the decades until Richard finally sold the restaurant in 2005.

But Richard Stockle couldn't stay away from the restaurant business. The new owner defaulted, and Richard regained the restaurant a few years later. The building had slipped into disrepair, so Richard and his team completely remodeled the place, adding curved booths and tasteful nude artwork. Richard's grandson Ben now serves as the restaurant's manager. And the chefs still cook the dishes that made Richard famous, as well as inventive items like ?The Something Good,? a New York steak wrapped in a flour tortilla filled with melted cheese.

1609 E Belmont Ave
Fresno,
CA
US

Though Enterprise’s menu focuses solely on seafood, the offerings are still diverse. The fresh fish dishes include British Columbian salmon sweetened with a Coca-Cola barbecue glaze, Costa Rican mahi-mahi topped with toasted macadamia nuts, and basa swai paired with citrus jasmine rice and Asian slaw. Seafood also bulks up pastas and sandwiches, and the dessert roster presents molten chocolate cake and key-lime pie.

Upon entering Enterprise, patrons may feel as though they’ve waded onto an immense sailboat. A blue-green marlin perches above the bar, and ship wheels and colorful buoys hang on the walls. Dock lights hook over each table, and an old-fashioned diving suit with a bronze helmet stands above the open grill, haughtily asking patrons how many leagues they can go under the sea.

225 State St.
Santa Barbara,
CA
US

When Don Disraeli and his wife, Randee, turned their attention to seafood retail in 1983, they considered more than their love of tasty fish. Drawing upon his PhD in Biology and her stint as a Scripps Institute of Oceanography researcher, the duo worked to ensure that each aspect of their business would be environmentally sustainable. Those standards are still upheld today, as Kanaloa Seafood remains one of the only North American and European seafood companies environmentally certified by the International Organization of Standardization.

Environmentally responsible fisheries supply the Disraelis with sushi-grade fish, which cutters clean and slice behind large viewing windows at Kanaloa Seafood’s Santa Barbara and Napa storefronts. The succulent cuts are then sustainably packaged inside recyclable corrugated boxes. Every Monday to Friday, guests can procure fish ranging from wild-caught black cod to Hawaiian ahi tuna. Patrons who are unsure of what to pick from the vast assortment will be greeted by a knowledgable staff member who will assist in picking out an ideal choice. Kanaloa Seafood also distributes a variety of marinades, rubs, oils, and sauces, as well as prepared dishes from the staff chef.

618 E Gutierrez St
Santa Barbara,
CA
US