French Restaurants in Medford

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At The Brasserie, chef Patrick Jean captures a balance between gourmet and relaxed dining, reflected in a menu bearing delectable but unfussy European-bistro-inspired fare. Unlike the timid american burger, which cowers inside a bun under a blanket of cheese, the french burger ($9 for lunch, $10 for dinner) invites public scrutiny while showboating around in a cape of savory black pepper, white mushroom, or blue cheese sauce. Seafood dishes unite unlikely plate mates, such as the tilapia ($18.95 for dinner) festooned with mango, cilantro, and lemon sauce, resulting in a combination bolder than the font of an angry letter typed by a 12-year-old. The most important hybrid meal of the day, brunch fuels bellies with a array of midday munchables, such as pancakes ($7+), including banana, chocolate chip, and blueberry, eggs florentine ($10), or the brunch platter, which comes with a waffle, pancake, piece of french toast, and an omelet ($14).

52 Sanford St
Fairfield,
CT
US

OceanView Bistro’s BYOB policy doesn’t apply to its chefs, who use wine as an ingredient in several dishes, including a chicken stew marinated in red wine and mussels sautéed in white wine. The bistro's dinner menu boasts an all-French lineup of escargot hors d’oeuvres, stews, seafood, and dessert crepes drizzled in lemon or orange sauce and served with scoops of ice cream. During breakfast and lunch hours, the chefs shift gears from French to American and serve up deli sandwiches, burgers, and pancakes.

201 Liberty Sq
Norwalk,
CT
US

Upon entering the doors of Simple Smoothie Cafe, visitors are greeted by the sounds of lively chatter and whirring blenders. Though they regularly play host to real fruits, fresh juices, and tart yogurts, these blenders never see artificial syrups or added sugars. Blueberry, pineapple, and banana smoothies pair nicely with paninis that burst with homemade chicken salad, smoked turkey, and mozzarella cheese. In addition to the regular menu, a selection of made-from-scratch soups rotates with the speed of a slow-motion roulette wheel to showcase a new special daily.

1070 Middle Country Rd
Selden,
NY
US

Drop in for a bite and a quaff and scan the appropriate breakfast or lunch menu. Start the day with an innovative omelette such as the Down Port (lump crab, asparagus, crisp bacon, roasted red pepper, and smoked gouda served with home fries and choice of toast; $11.95), or maintain a flavor-fueled daytrip with a wrap such as the house-made chicken salad with apple, mixed greens, and tomato ($9.95) or the half-pound gorgonzola and roasted red pepper burger, with lettuce, tomato, and red onion served with fries and a salad ($10.95). Bring a special someone for a tandem plunge into the molten goodness of cheese or chocolate fondue ($25 for a couple), or bring a crowd of friendly strangers to bond over tasty tapas ($9–$12).

242 E Main St
Port Jefferson,
NY
US

A gooey blend of honey-maple sauce drips from Z Pita's signature sweet-potato fries, which complement many of the restaurant's Italian and Mediterranean dishes. Though their eclectic menu has long encompassed pastas, pita platters, and other global fare, it only recently acquired seafood, such as the golden-brown swordfish puttanesca filet; cooks embellish the dish with sautéed capers, tomatoes, black olives, and onions before serving it over penne in light marinara sauce. Every night from 5 p.m. to close, they also funnel sweet Belgian chocolate and savory cheese fondues into pots for sharing or throwing at people wearing white after Labor Day.

217 Main St
Port Jefferson,
NY
US

Quaint boutiques and white clapboard municipal buildings line the streets of Stony Brook, which resides about 50 miles east of Manhattan on the leafy north shore of Long Island. Though the town has a rich colonial past, it went underwent a transformation in 1939 led by Ward Melville, the proprietor of Three Village Inn. This renaissance produced Stony Brook University, one of the top research universities in the country.The town transformation also helped produce the nation's first planned shopping center, known as Harbor Crescent. Located just across from the inn, the colonial-style shopping promenade is grouped around a Federalist-style post office adorned with a mechanical eagle that has flapped its wings every hour on the hour since 1941.The Ward Melville Heritage Organization oversees the Stony Brook Grist Mill, which was built in 1751 and gives a glimpse into the town's history. In addition, the organization helps put on wetland pontoon cruises and can help visitors replace their car tires with wheels from covered wagons.

150 Main Street
Stony Brook,
NY
US