Galleries in Midtown

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Art Center Supply Store's two classically trained master framers have 25 years of experience in matting, mounting, and encasing treasures. Acid-free, museum-quality conservation matting and framing preserves prints of baby's first whitewater rafting trip while inhibiting future wear and tear. Framing prices vary widely based on object and size, running from $3.95 per foot to $60 per foot for handmade Italian framing materials. Art Center’s border buffs also perform dry mounting, a technique reserved for water-sensitive prints in which heat bonds the artwork and mounting board together, similar to when a flock of rubber ducks fly too close to the sun.

1636 Union Ave
Memphis,
TN
US

Teresa White, AKA "Blown Fuse," zooms around the track, knocking into her roller-derby opponents while fans cheer. She's clearly not afraid of breaking a nail. During the day, however, White gives her alias a second meaning and demonstrates her delicate side—she's an artist and a teacher, and her choice medium is glass. 

It wasn't always easy for White to work in glass, however. Even though she earned her bachelor of fine arts degree from Memphis College of Art, she had to rely on friends, books, and videos to teach her the more specialized techniques of glass fusing and blowing, as reported by the Commercial Appeal. Wishing to share her new knowledge and give others access to the glasswork instruction that she couldn't easily find, she opened Studio 1688 and began teaching. 

Today, backed by 14 years of teaching experience, White leads beginner to advanced classes in glass blowing, fusing, slumping, and flame work, teaching students the fine arts of shaping glass pendants, coasters, and ornaments of their own. In her studio, she also fills clients' orders for custom pieces, such as tailor-made sink basins, sushi sets, and oil lamps.

497 N Hollywood St
Memphis,
TN
US

The Fire Museum of Memphis uses a combination of interactive exhibits, artifacts, restorations, and multimedia to illustrate Memphis's history of fire damage and to honor those who dedicate their lives to fighting fires. Built inside the refurbished Fire Engine House No. 1, the museum itself is a rich piece of history. The Memorial Wall's larger-than-life sculptures are a riveting tribute to the heroes who fell in the line of duty, and a collection of prints and portraits honors the 12 brave men who made up the first class of African-American firefighters in 1955. Alongside a bevy of antiques from past eras of fire fighting, the horse-drawn E.H. Crump Steamer, named after the late mayor, will evoke a simpler time—before motor-technologies subjugated our equestrian allies to achieving glory primarily as silly-named racing horses.

118 Adams Ave
Memphis,
TN
US

For roughly a decade, the museum has been inviting curious rockers and the occasional roller to take a stroll through a musically guided journey through time. What started as an exhibit at the Smithsonian quickly took on a life of its own, developing into an independent museum commemorating the hoots and hollers of a genre. The historical galleries begin at the literal grassroots of the movement, chronicling the field music sung by rural agricultural workers. The galleries continue through the seventies, where a great deal of soul came into the mix and things really started to take off. In between, learn about the iconic label Sun Records, tips on growing a gnarly rock-n-soul beard, and how the music influenced an entire generation during the civil rights revolution.

191 Beale St
Memphis,
TN
US

With its exposed brick walls and modern furniture, 300 South Main Gallery and Venue is a piece of art in and of itself. Located fittingly in the Art District, the chameleon-like space transforms for a wide range of events, such as birthday parties, art exhibits, and instructional classes. The latter of those includes adult-centered sessions in which artists offset brush strokes with sips of wine.

300 S Main St.
Memphis,
TN
US

When Jack and Marilyn Belz first stepped into a Los Angeles art gallery in 1968, it was their first step into a lifelong passion for Chinese art. Over the years, their collection grew so much that in 1998, they opened a museum that featured their expansive collection. According to the couple, "the intricate creations of Chinese artists rank among the most inspiring" to them. Visitors to the museum today find not only Chinese artwork from eras past, but also modern Judaica art.?

  • Size:?The Chinese collection ranges from 202 B.C. to early 2008 and encompasses more than 1,400 individual objects such as paintings, carved jades, textiles, and sculptures.?
  • Eye Catcher: An ornate and intricate wedding carriage carved completely from jade, including the horse.
  • Permanent Mainstay: According to staff, the museum holds the largest displayed collection by renowned Judaica artist Daniel Kafri, including 32 bronze relief sculptures illustrating biblical scenes.
  • Don't Miss: a rare carved mammoth tusk from the late 18th century
  • Newest Exhibit: The Holocaust Memorial Gallery honors survivors, refugees, and liberators who live in Tennessee with displays of their personal stories and artifacts from that time.
  • Special Programs: The Emperor's Lunch program includes a guided tour of the museum followed by a Chinese box lunch.
119 S Main St.
Memphis,
TN
US