Museums in Mesa

Up to 55% Off Pop Culture Museum Visits

Arizona Pop Culture Experience

Phoenix

$20 $10

Museum with more than 13,000 action figures, comic books, and pieces of memorabilia covers the last 50 to 60 years of pop culture

Rosson House Museum – Up to 40% Off a Visit

Rosson House Museum

Rosson House Museum

$15 $9

Spacious Victorian home built in 1895 has been restored so guests can take a peek into Arizona's late territorial period

Up to 46% Off Firefighting Museum Admission

The Hall of Flame Fire Museum

Phoenix

$28 $15

(108)

Nearly an acre of exhibits trace international firefighting history, from old-fashioned fire engines to helmets from around the world

Up to 46% Off at Superstition Mountain Museum

Superstition Mountain Museum

North Pinal

$13.50 $8

Explore the history of the Superstition Mountains, Apache Junction, and the Lost Dutchman Mine; recreations of 19th century buildings

Up to 50% Off at Desert Caballeros Western Museum

Desert Caballeros Western Museum

Wickenburg

$18 $9

(83)

Explore artifacts of the Old West and Arizona culture including a collection of paintings and sculptures made by Western women

Up to 50% Arizona State Museum Membership

Arizona State Museum

University of Arizona

$40 $20

(33)

Museum explores Southwest Indian history and contemporary life through 3,000,000 artifacts, film, interactive exhibits & immersive programs

Planes of Fame Air Museum – 50% Off

Planes of Fame Air Museum

Valle

$13.90 $7

When the museum opened in 1957, it housed 10 planes; today it hosts more than 40

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Self-expression and imagination have no age limits. That's the idea behind Arizona Museum for Youth, a gathering place for youngsters to explore art and their own creativity. Rotating exhibitions, which have included glow-in-the-dark portraits and bead art, showcase that stimulate children's imaginations as well as the sense of sight. Guests can follow the spark of inspiration and create their own magnum opuses during art classes or in the museum's interactive play area, Artville. Decorated with giant-size paint brushes and other art equipment, Artville presents kids with a colorful array of play stations and even a performance arts center to stage productions of Waiting for Go Dog Go.

35 N Robson
Mesa,
AZ
US

Today’s side deal gets you a $43 main floor ticket to see The Phoenix Symphony’s Argentine Tango! at the Mesa Arts Center on Sunday, January 24, at 2 p.m. for $25. Take in a sensual and sultry performance by bandoneón master Raul Jaurena and special guests as part of the Target World Music Festival.

1 E Main St
Mesa,
AZ
US

Four-and-a-half billion. That’s how many years of history fits into the Arizona Museum of Natural History’s 80,000 square feet. The Origins gallery orients extremely disoriented visitors with a timeline that traces the most significant events in the history of the cosmos and planet Earth. From there, visitors browse the museum’s 60,000 artifacts, such as the Dinosaur Hall’s T-rex skull and full skeleton of an adolescent triceratops. On the three-story Dinosaur Mountain—flash floods gush every 23 minutes and endanger roaring replicas of dinosaurs such as a stegosaurus and tyrannosaurus.

Though chockfull of dinosaurs, not everything at the museum is saurian in nature. The museum’s Mesoamerica and South America section, for instance, focuses on artifacts from ancient cultures, such as the Maya and the early civilizations of Central Mexico.

In exhibitions on Arizona’s history, guests can explore the labyrinthine Lost Dutchman Mine, search for gold in the History Courtyard, and get locked away in an actual territorial jail that used to house outlaws, cattle rustlers, and a guy who said the jailer's chaps made his thighs look fat. In addition to all the museum’s historical relics, there are living creatures on display, including a Gila monster and a soft-shelled turtle named Tom.

53 N MacDonald
Mesa,
AZ
US

Housing numerous artifacts and anecdotes that catalog Arizona's near-100-year statehood, the Arizona Historical Society Museum at Papago Park takes visitors on a voyage through pivotal moments in the state's history. The museum's exhibits, like flashlights swallowed by a history book, illuminate the narratives of famous Arizonans—including the first female Supreme Court Justice, Sandra Day O'Connor—and provide insight into Arizona's Japanese internment camps and Papago Park POW camps during World War II. With a mix of info-rich text, multimedia displays and hands-on learning, the exhibits keep visitors engaged and entertained, much like betrothals performed as rock ballads.

1300 N College Ave
Tempe,
AZ
US

Bessie Heard dedicated years of her life to philanthropic efforts throughout the McKinney area, helping plant hackberry trees along downtown streets and establishing an American Red Cross chapter during World War I. However, she accomplished her greatest feat in 1967 when the Heard Natural Science Museum & Wildlife Sanctuary opened to the public. With 289 acres of rolling space, the sanctuary functions as a testament to the diversity of local flora and fauna, educating visitors and urging them to protect those species for future generations.

More than 6.5 miles of unpaved hiking trails wind throughout the sanctuary, allowing visitors to immerse themselves in habitats that range from tall-grass prairie to limestone slopes. The grounds shelter more than 150 varieties of wildflowers and plants, as well as more than 240 species of birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians. In addition to the trails, the sanctuary also features an extensive garden of native trees, grasses, and perennials, as well as a treetop ropes course (reservation required; additional fees apply). Indoors, interactive exhibits and collections impart valuable information on north-Texan geology, marine life, and venomous snakes.

2301 N Central Ave
Phoenix,
AZ
US

The Hall of Flame Fire Museum showcases the history of firefighting with nearly an acre's worth of exhibits and restored pieces of firefighting equipment that date as far back as 1725. Visitors can check out a Rhode Island fire engine from 1844 that was capable of pumping 250 gallons of water per minute to put out fires or 250 gallons of sarsaparilla per minute to fuel citywide block parties. The Hall's 400 fire helmet collection presents 400 protective headpieces from around the world, and in the museum's sixth gallery, the National Firefighting Hall of Heroes honors firefighters who were decorated for heroism and those who have died in the line of duty.

6101 E Van Buren St
Phoenix,
AZ
US