Bars in Metairie

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Though its name implies a quick chug or hurried meal, most customers tend to linger at Down the Hatch. That?s because the bar and grill offers scads of activities and creative Cajun-inspired bites to keep loungers happy long into the night. Most evenings here start at a dining room table, where alligator po-boys, smoky pulled pork, and Angus beef burgers are some of the menu?s biggest crowd-pleasers. As the food disappears from plates and more drinks get ordered, crowds diverge onto the brick patio or linger around the bar or jukebox. Amid the festive groups, there are even folks getting work done courtesy of the free Wi-Fi and the belief that the best writers are inspired by whiskey.

1921 Sophie Wright Pl
New Orleans,
LA
US

As chefs simmer authentic New Orleans shrimp étouffée and watch gulf shrimp blacken, chicken and andouille-sausage gumbo bubbles in a pot nearby, filling the kitchen with a spicy aroma. Marigny Brasserie’s menu earned a "good to very good rating" across the board from Zagat, thanks in part to its menu of creole favorites and its wine list. Diners at the bar can peer over at a stained-glass inset of the Marigny Triangle, while those who choose to eat outside can catch a glimpse of Frenchmen Street in person. On some nights, guests can taste spicy shrimp while listening to musicians tune guitars and fill their maracas with fresh bees.

640 Frenchmen St
New Orleans,
LA
US

Friendly bartenders have been serving up pints of Guinness to sports enthusiasts since Tracey's Original Irish Channel Bar first opened its doors in 1949. Decades of Irish paraphernalia line the exposed brick walls, which envelop guests as they sip brews at the lengthy wooden bar or bite into seafood-studded poboys and corned-beef sandwiches in vinyl booths. While 20 televisions document the progress of the day?s sporting events, diners can snag chalk from the pool table to prep their cues for a game of eight ball or to draw a mournful outline around an empty basket of fried okra.

2604 Magazine St
New Orleans,
LA
US

In 1977, Professor Longhair didn't have long to live. As a human bridge connecting early 20th century blues, traditional Big Easy jazz, and Cuban funk, the now legendary musician changed the soundtrack to the city, paving the way for acts such as Dr. John and Allen Toussaint. Perhaps most notably, he penned the ubiquitous carnival anthem "Mardi Gras in New Orleans." But when it looked like his time was up, the NOLA community wasn't going to let him fade away. A group of fans, dubbed "The Fabulous Fo'teen," sought out a spot for the "Fess" to play at until his dying day. And that's exactly what he did at Tipitina's. They even named the place after one of his songs.

Proof that a former gambling parlor and cathouse can change its ways, Tipitina's century-old building has earned a reputation as one of New Orleans's finest music venues. Within its hallowed walls, many famous Crescent City acts have launched to stardom, from funk collectives such as The Neville Brothers and The Meters to rockers like Better than Ezra and the Radiators. All of these names grace the outdoor Walk of Fame, and the club also attracts national artists such as Wilco and Nine Inch Nails. However, the venue's immersion in the musical community goes beyond just shows—it also hosts music lessons for kids, weekly Cajun dance parties, and a retirement home for senior citizen horns. But as much as Tipitina's has expanded over time, it pays respect to the Longhair of its namesake every year with the appropriately punned "Fess Jazztival."

501 Napoleon Ave
New Orleans,
LA
US

It may be housed in one of the French Quarter's most historic properties, but Bourbon Heat is far from old fashioned. Inside its Carriage Way bar, a lighted bar stretches along one wall, big-screen TVs above it broadcasting the evening's sporting events. After, revelers can visit Club Heat where colorful LED lights revolve around the space, illuminating the dance floor as the DJ pulses house music and rhythmic beats.

But, if you're paying attention, you'll notice the crystal chandeliers and exposed-brick walls that hint at the more traditional vibe found outside. There, at the Courtyard Bar & Grill, wrought-iron tables are scattered across a flagstone patio where Bourbon Street's jazz musicians are often overheard. In this allegedly haunted space, servers ferry colorful cocktails from the carved wooden bar and traditional New Orleanian dishes such as jambalaya and po' boys. Inside, guests can kick back and listen to live tunes or watch live sporting events on one of its LED screens.

711 Bourbon Street
New Orleans,
LA
US

The Urban Dare Adventure Race is a fast-paced competition that challenges two-person teams to decipher clues, navigate the city, and perform playful stunts. Combining the bustle of a track meet with the brain-taxing sleuth work of a luge competition, the race uses a dozen trivia-based clues to lead contestants to checkpoints all over their sprawling metropolis. Location hunters reach their checkpoints by whatever means necessary, be it hopping a bus downtown, flying madly through a network of secret ziplines, or scuba-diving in a fountain for bus fare. At the mini destinations, racers must use a camera to document their presence or, in some cases, get their passports stamped after completing challenges that may include a climbing wall or solving a riddle.

940 Saint Louis St
New Orleans,
LA
US