Local Services in Upper East Side

Select Local Merchants

We are an environmental education nonprofit with two community centers adjacent to Milwaukee County parks (or, as we like to call them “outdoor classrooms”).

1500 E Park Pl
Milwaukee,
WI
US

The eponymous shuttersnapper at Laura Couture Photography captures candid moments of tykes and transforms them into snazzy portraits and prints. Like a sundial wristwatch, the dedicated photographer works with only 100% natural light, expertly nabbing the pure, unadulterated bliss of childhood with sunlit flair. Each on-location session lasts approximately 60 minutes, with an unlimited fount of precious images captured in each shoot. Within four weeks, customers receive an email containing a link, password, and secret knock allowing access to an online gallery of the results. Once they pick out their four favorite slices of life, doting parents receive a high-quality set of prints (within 3–4 weeks), along with a pair of digital images to show off to adoring robot nannies.

2300 East Ivanhoe Place
Milwaukee,
WI
US

Click here for the class schedule. Though today's Groupon includes instruction, students must pay a $40 material fee.

3575 North Oakland Avenue
Shorewood,
WI
US

The friendly clothing cleansers at Martinizing Dry Cleaning have been scrubbing the enrobements of southeastern Wisconsinians for more than 40 years. The noble employees will confront any stain with strong words and all the dirt-scattering ammo in their arsenal, ensuring your garments return to you soft, clean, and smelling like pastoral Latvian pancake houses. Sweat-soaked blouses ($8.03), mud-caked slacks ($8.04), butter-drenched bedspreads (starting at $24.31), and your beloved sea-water-doused prom jumpsuit ($21.30) will be cleaned, freshly dried, and folded into neat origami ostriches. The Department of Natural Resources–partnered environmental dry cleaner will bestow upon you the freshly cleaned garments on recycled hangers, enclosed in recycled bags.

3596 N Oakland Ave
Shorewood,
WI
US

uBreakiFix CEO Justin Wetherill spoke with Groupon about the importance of protecting your smartphone and the challenges of fixing a phone that has been dropped into a deep fryer.

On the worst thing you can do after cracking your smartphone?s glass screen

?Don?t just put it into your pocket and continue to use it,? Wetherill says. The broken glass can actually cause serious damage to the phone?s inner components and turn a relatively simple fix into a costly repair job.

On the repair process

"Look, this is something we do every day," Wetherill says. "You are not the first person to break a phone.? Collectively, uBreakiFix's highly trained technicians repair more than 20,000 devices a month, drawing from a library of high-quality parts that are tested twice before they ever get used in a repair service. Free diagnostics are a staple at all uBreakiFix locations, so customers understand the problem before any work is done.

On growing his business

uBreakiFix began as a business based out of Wetherill?s living room, and it now boasts more than 60 locations nationwide. ?We are proof that the American dream is alive,? he says.

On unusual repair jobs

Wetherill remembers one fast-food employee who dropped her phone into a restaurant?s deep fryer. ?It smelled pretty bad,? he said; however, the repairs were successful. Another customer lost his phone in a cement mixer. After some serious effort, the technicians were able to safely recover all of the important data, but the phone died a few hours later. As Wetherill pointed out, ?it did go through a cement mixer.? Some miracles just aren?t meant to be.

On the importance of a one-day turnaround time

Repairs at uBreakiFix?s store locations can often take as little as an hour, according to Wetherill. This is a critical part of the shops' focus?something Wetherill personally understands. If forced to choose between spending the weekend without his smartphone or his left arm, he jokes that he would pick the arm. ?Of course, this is assuming that there wouldn?t be any pain,? he laughs.

1857 E Kenilworth Pl
Milwaukee,
WI
US

It's rare for museums to have cozy dining rooms, but the Charles Allis Art Museum wasn't always a museum. Earlier in the 20th century, it was businessman and arts patron Charles Allis's Tudor-style mansion. Allis bequeathed it to the public along with his massive art collection, though, and nowadays, visitors can stop by to see pieces that span 2,000 years. Some highlights? Works by Winslow Homer, Classic antiquities, a large collection of Asian ceramics, plus rotating exhibits by local Wisconsin artists.

The Villa Terrace Decorative Arts Museum nestles in a historic mansion, too, albeit a different one. This one was built in the likeness of an Italian Renaissance villa in 1923, by architect David Adler. Its art spans a smaller period, from the 15th century through to the 18th. Visitors can browse wrought-iron work by Cyril Colnik, and explore a formal, outdoor Renaissance garden.

2220 N Terrace Ave
Milwaukee,
WI
US