Galleries in Northeast Minneapolis

Select Local Merchants

Since 1995, the dexterous framers at Hang It Inc. have been embellishing artwork and other displayables with more than 1,000 first-rate frame varieties culled from around the world. Enclose a photograph or a napkin from a particularly delicious barbecue dinner with a 16”x20" black wood frame ($64), equipped with glass and a mount. Drab dorm rooms are illuminated with a poster encased in a 24”x36" black metal frame ($69), and gold, silver, and ornate borders enable customized constructions. Other combinations may be seen here. Hang It’s unique plasma-TV-framing service adorns wall-hung television sets with a quality picture frame and liner, transforming T.J. Hooker reruns into art. After shopping, customers can peruse the studio's art gallery, Gallery 122, which features a variety of mediums from local artists.

122 8th St SE
Minneapolis,
MN
US

Seasoned artist Malcom Potek calls upon more than two decades of glass-manipulating experience while crafting intricate, multicolored tiles and custom sconces that suit the unique architecture of their intended edifices. Within his shop and gallery, a glossy collection of already made glass portraits, beads, and tiles entices eyes to ogle one-of-a-kind designs instead of Betty Boop?shaped clouds. Visitors inspired by Potek's work can learn the tricks of the trade during a variety of glass-blowing classes that set participants on the path to glass-blowing certification.

2205 California St NE
Minneapolis,
MN
US

When Layl McDill's daughters were little, she would carry small bricks of polymer clay in her purse for them to play with. Over the years, the pastime evolved into a serious profession for her. Forming ropes of the colorful, malleable material into millefiore canes, McDill honed her skills, creating patterns, pictures, and delicious pies from the carefully sliced clay logs. With the help and support of her husband and fellow artist, Josh Blanc, Layl founded Clay Squared to Infinity in 1996, where today she not only creates and displays her own artwork, but also leads classes for clay-curious artists of all ages.

34 13th Ave NE, Ste 109
Minneapolis,
MN
US

Juxtaposition Arts (JXTA) engages 650 young artists in North Minneapolis annually in hands-on educational programs that teach professional design, production, and marketing skills. Led by professional artists and higher-education instructors, each job-training studio uses an integrative, problem-solving curriculum that guides students through the planning, production, and marketing of high-quality design products, which can then be sold to both local and national customers. Through its programs, JXTA aims to transform young artists into innovators and problem solvers, arming them with the confidence, skills, and connections to successfully enter and thrive in the creative workforce. A strong focus on community-based creative expression encourages participating youth to contribute to the revitalization of their own communities as they develop their careers.

2007 Emerson Ave N
Minneapolis,
MN
US

Founded in the mid '90s by a group of textile artists and patrons, the Textile Center's goal is to honor, foster, and support fiber artists and increase the tradition of textile art's visibility and accessibility. The center is home to four fiber art galleries, a library, and a professionally equipped dye lab. Currently celebrating its 20th anniversary, in addition to its vast array of supplies, the center sells local and international artists' works of art in its shop such as accessories, home d?cor, and seasonal gifts . These include wearable pieces for patrons, such as embroidered pendants, and wearable pieces for tables, such as coasters, runners, and woven place mats. Curious newbies and seasoned artists alike can enroll in classes, which range in focus from basic dyeing to crocheting to sustainable fashion design.

3000 University Ave SE
Minneapolis,
MN
US

Originally the home of the Dakota and Ojibwe, Hennepin County began with the hopes and dreams of immigrants, New Englanders, and retired veterans. Why these entrepreneurs, farmers, laborers, craftsman, and vacationers decided to settle in what seemed to be a frigid, uninhabitable land is still a mystery, but their innovations and lineage are traced through the exhibits at Hennepin History Museum. The museum, located inside the historic George Christian mansion, hosts rotating exhibits and permanent collections that paint a picture of Midwestern life in the 19th and 20th centuries. From more recent decades, there are objects from Minneapolis Aquatennials and high-fashion clothes from downtown department stores such as Dayton's and Young-Quinlan. The Pillsbury Doughboy presides over it all, reminding guests of the importance of milling to the region's history.

Photographs, personal papers, and atlases round out the collection, whose contents are further illuminated during the museum’s frequent events. Experts and authors, for instance, deliver talks in the museum’s intimate fireside room, whose fireplace keeps guests warm and prevents them from huddling in the museum's historical bear-skin rugs. In another tucked-away area, researchers and amateur historians pore through the material in the library, which is open to visitors 5 days a week, and in the archives, which is open by appointment. They might find maps of the region from the start of the 20th Century or old pictures of homes in the neighborhood, all steeped in memories and history.

2303 3rd Ave S
Minneapolis,
MN
US