Sushi in Minneapolis

Select Local Merchants

Hotel restaurants can sometimes blend together in a generic parade of pork chops and mashed potatoes. Rare Steak & Sushi, however, bursts out of the mold with its selection of grass-fed steaks and innovative sushi. Located on the second floor of the Grand Hotel, the eatery charmed Dara Moskowitz Grumdahl of Minnesota Monthly, who raved about its grass-fed steaks. To complement cuts of filet mignon and New York strip steaks, Chef Chano also rolls up 30 varieties of sushi. The creations range from the simple—such as freshwater-eel sashimi—to the complex, including a hawaiian roll packed with tuna, pineapple, and fried almonds or the vegetarian salad roll, which Grumdahl was “especially wild about.” A quick scan of the dining room reveals a diverse collection of clientele, as the eatery—open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner—appeals to locals, businesspeople, and hotel guests alike.

615 2nd Ave S
Minneapolis,
MN
US

The passion for fresh fish is reflected through Nami Sushi’s aquatic motif and even in the name— nami means wave in Japanese. The fish is so delicious that CBS Local hailed the restaurant as on of the best sushi spots in the Twin Cities in late 2010. A marble sushi bar runs the length of the dining room, chilling the colorful slabs of tuna, salmon, and octopus that sushi chefs mold into signature nigiri, specialty rolls, and abstract self portraits. Behind the scenes, a kitchen staff churns out hot entrees such as the new york strip teriyaki, shrimp tempura, and sautéed ginger chicken.

251 1st Ave N
Minneapolis,
MN
US

Described by Mpls.St.Paul Magazine's editors as "as close to an authentic Japanese sushi bar as we come in the Twin Cities," Fuji Ya is a destination for sushi and sake served in a "hypnotic atmosphere." At each of its two locations, chefs diligently slice freshly flown-in yellowtail and surf clam, all of which populate the extensive menu. Sidle up to the sushi bar to watch the assemblage of maki rolls and sushi platters, or gather in private zashiki rooms to dine on hot entrees of sesame-crusted tuna and roasted duck with citrus soy glaze.

600 W Lake St
Minneapolis,
MN
US

The Monster Club Crawl unites costumed carousers for seven hours of food and drink specials, costume contests, and spirits sampling, providing VIP access to revelry at 10 of the spookiest bars and nightclubs in Minneapolis. With the Monster Crawl pass, patrons can begin the eerie evening with specialty starting-point events including the Monster Poker Tournament at Whisky Park (starting at 6 p.m.), or Roller Crawlers at Gay 90's. Elixir Lounge primes partygoers with $3 Michelob Golden Lite bottles in anticipation for the open crawl (starting at 10 p.m.) to bars including Ugly Mug, known for spine tingles of the sporting variety, and Aqua, which hosts a dance floor bathed in incandescent lighting and surrounded by pillars that never seem to blink. Nightclubs Bar Fly and Seven corral paranormal partiers during the closing crawl (12 a.m.), inviting patrons to unwind at a candlelit table or strut their stuff until 2 a.m., when all dance floors turn back into shuffleboard courts.

700 Hennepin Ave
Minneapolis,
MN
US

Japanese hibachi-style cooking, or teppanyaki, is a culinary experience wherein chefs cook on gas-heated hotplates in front of diners. After it migrated to a bigger spot in Calhoun Square, Sushi Tango added a set of specialty hibachi tables for close-up savory showmanship. Prep your palate with edamame ($4.95) or pork gyoza (dumplings, $5) before diving into the briny depths of seafood hibachi dinners such as shrimp ($22), calamari ($18), or salmon steak teriyaki ($22). As Sushi Tango's friendly chefs chop and stir together a hibachi full of meat such as your choice of white or dark chicken ($17) or filet mignon ($24), they'll keep things interesting with jokes, culinary sleight of hand, and lightning-quick knife-fu. All Sushi Tango's hibachi dinners are served with green tea, soup, salad, shrimp appetizers, vegetables, and fried or steamed rice. Special combinations such as musta sefu (steak and shrimp, $28) and surf and turf (filet mignon and lobster tail, $36) are also available on the hibachi menu.

3001 Hennepin Ave
Minneapolis,
MN
US

Lilly's – A Kentucky Bistro: A User's Guide

Southern-Inspired Food | Local Ingredients | Food Network–Lauded Grits | Acclaimed Chef
Sample Menu
  • Starter: Red-wine poached-pear salad with Boone Creek blue cheese, cranberry-pear balsamic, and housemade granola
  • Entree: Pappy Van Winkle dinner scallops with loaded grits, Southern collards, and rosemary-lobster cream
  • Dessert: bread pudding with hot-toddy sauce
What to Drink: Befitting of a place that’s a stone’s throw from Bourbon Country, there's a lengthy list of authentic bourbons to indulge in. If bourbon's not your thing, there’s also an award-winning wine list and a selection of cocktails to whet your whistle. Whatever you order, be thankful for it; back in 1988, Lilly's opened without so much as a wine license.

When to Go: If you’re not in the mood for a big entree, head in on Wednesday evening to take advantage of the Small Plate Wednesday menu, which showcases a rotating selection of shareable farm-to-table dishes. You’ll also likely be treated to a 50% discount on selected bottles of fine wine.

Who's in the Kitchen? Since opening Lilly's, chef-owner Kathy Cary has become something of a regional icon, garnering acclaim for her creative use of organic veggies, free-range beef, and artisanal cheeses. She even landed a feature spot on Food Network's FoodNation with Bobby Flay, where she touted her creamy Kentucky grits and gourmet fried-green tomatoes. Recognized as a pioneer in the farm-to-table movement, Chef Cary prides herself on an unbending loyalty to local purveyors within a 90-minute drive of the city.

While You're Waiting
  • Munch on the complimentary basket of sourdough potato bread, which comes with a carafe of rosemary olive oil. The only way to get butter to the table is by requesting it, or by smuggling it in with a flask.
  • Soak in the sun in the main dining room. The large floor-to-ceiling windows suffuse the space with natural light and offer prime views of the bustling pedestrian activity on the corner of Bardstown and Patterson.
If You Can’t Stick Around: When a full meal just doesn't fit into your schedule, stop into La Peche, a gourmet to-go café that operates in what used to be one of Lilly's private rooms. Chef Cary opened the original La Peche in 1979, and she serves up some old-time favorites such as the strawberry pie.

30 N 1st St
Minneapolis,
MN
US