Symphony in Missouri

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With sonorously soaring aerialists, seamless integration of modern-dance choreography, and harmonious orchestration, Symphonic Quixotic embodies a sensory experience invoking the classical elements of fire, earth, wind, and water. Quixotic Fusion's bombastic performances defy classification as the gravity-defettered dancers twist and fly to the beat of modern mixes before a hypnotizing video composition like so many raver leaves grooving in gusts of trip-hop winds.

1029 Central Street
Kansas City,
MO
US

In support of her high-decibel new album, Rihanna kicks off her hotly anticipated LOUD tour with emphatic gusto and a sizzling roster of special guests. Like an art show at a sundae bar, the LOUD tour floods the senses, enchanting audiences with lavishly designed sets, myriad costume changes, move-busting dancers, and Rihanna's songbook of Grammy magnets. Crooner Cee Lo Green augments the songful offerings with his own vocal talents, and Roc Nation rapper and rhythm scientist J. Cole further helps resuscitate ear drums traumatized by the outside world's blaring car horns and shrill howler monkeys.

1400 Market Street
St. Louis,
MO
US

In a city rich in jazz heritage, the Kansas City Jazz Orchestra culls some of the finest saxophonists, trumpeters, trombonists, and rhythm players from the local scene to revivify music from jazz's booming big-band era. During the "Tribute to Gerry Mulligan" concert, the orchestra revisits the legendary baritone saxophonist's repertoire, backed up by the musician's longtime rhythm section of bassist Dean Johnson and drummer Ron Vincent. Along with Miles Davis, Mulligan helped fuel the cool-jazz movement, inspiring other players to tone down their tempos, lighten the tones, and wear sunglasses at night. Although his songs marked a sophisticated revolution for the genre, they also contained gritty, soulful elements mimetic of Mulligan's edgy personal life, including a drug arrest that the Guardian named the 20th key event in the history of jazz music, coming in right behind the day Charlie Parker blew a newborn dove out of his saxophone.

707 West 47th Street
Kansas City,
MO
US

Ornate chandeliers and a high-ceilinged auditorium are just two stunning features of Powell Hall, an opulent, Versailles-inspired concert venue built in 1925. Originally known as the Saint Louis Theatre, Powell Hall was bequeathed its new moniker after the Saint Louis Symphony Society won it during a heated card game with a band of ragtag vaudeville performers. With its marble-accented lobby and sprawling interior, Powell Hall continues to beckon visitors to take in its inimitable sights and classic sounds.

718 N Grand Blvd
Saint Louis,
MO
US

• For $25, you get one seat in section 101, 102, 121, or 122 (a $49.50 value before fees, or up to a $62.25 value online, including all Ticketmaster fees). • For $45, you get one seat in section 103, 104, 105, 118, 119, or 120 (a $99.50 value before fees, or up to a $113.95 value online, including all Ticketmaster fees).

1407 Grand Blvd
Kansas City,
MO
US

The performance begins with Kansas City Symphony Music Director Michael Stern leading the ensemble through Maurice Ravel's 1919 Le Tombeau de Couperin, a four-movement orchestral homage to baroque composer François Couperin. Next, the evocative melody of Samuel Barber's 1947 lyric rhapsody for orchestra and voice, Knoxville: Summer of 1915, fills the air as Ms. Murphy narrates scenes from author James Agee's dreamlike childhood memoir. After a brief intermission for flutes of champagne and handfuls of de-sloppied sloppy joes (also known as Dapper Dans), Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 4 sneaks into the concert hall with the jingle of two sleigh bells, then erupts into a ghostly scherzo that builds to a solemn march before finally reaching a gentle conclusion with the soprano's bucolic, childlike warbling.

1020 Central St
Kansas City,
MO
US