Sightseeing in Monticello


$35 for a 60-Minute Sweetheart Cruise on Lake Minnetonka for 2 from Wayzata Bay Charters ($66.90 Value)

Wayzata Bay Charters

Excelsior

Passengers take in the natural scenery and sip champagne on a 60 ft. yacht

$66.90 $35

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Two-Hour Self-Guided Segway Tour for Two or Four from Evolve Segway (Up to 52% Off)

Segway of Minnesota

City Lakes Area

Riders roll through lake trails on self-guided Segway tours; includes comprehensive rider orientation

$196 $99

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Distillery Tour, T-Shirt and Craft Cocktails for Two or Four People at Du Nord Craft Spirits (Up to 52% Off)

Du Nord Craft Spirits

Longfellow

Take a tour of the facility that ends in the cocktail room, where the company’s craft spirits imbue drinks with their signature flavor notes

$68 $39

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Admission for Two to Minnesota Landscape Arboretum (Up to Half Off). Two Options Available.

Minnesota Landscape Arboretum

ATM

Sweeping arboretum captivates guests with more than 1,200 acres of gardens, prairies, and woodland trails containing 5,000+ plant species

$24 $12

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Standup Paddleboard & Yoga Class for One, Two, or Four or SUP Rental at Stand Up Paddle and Sail (Up to 51% Off)

Stand Up Paddle and Sail

Stand Up Paddle and Sail

Hands-on training session that gives beginners the foundation toward mastering stand up paddling with emphasis on form, rhythm, and balance

$180 $89

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$69 for a Chocolate & Wine Decadence Bus Tour from Taste Twin Cities ($130 Value)

Taste Twin Cities

Saint Paul

Learn the rich ways that chocolate and wine make a perfect pair and sample truffles that have Oprah’s seal of approval

$130 $69

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Segway Rental or Tour from All American Segway (Up to 51% Off). Five Options Available.

All American Segway Tours

Multiple Locations

On guided tours, Segways travel around Lake McKusick or roll along the St. Croix River before heading into Lakefront Park

$80 $39

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Select Local Merchants

In 1977, Mark and Joan Hemker began with a simple dream: to own a zoo. Starting with just a few waterfowl, they soon amassed a collection of animals from around the world. After Mark passed away in 2006, Joan and their four children took up his mantle, keeping his legacy alive through Hemker Park & Zoo. Today, the family-friendly park introduces visitors of all ages to global wildlife with more than 50 animal species. Residents include giant tortoises, an 8-foot boa constrictor, sleek kangaroos, and inquisitive monkeys and lemurs. There's also a Budgie Buddy House where tiny birds alight on visitors' shoulders and two New Guinea singing dogs who never, ever do autographs. Seasonal events, such as kids' zoo camps and the Close Encounters program, let visitors touch and feed certain animals under the guidance of professional educators for an even more intimate experience.
26715 Co Road 39
Freeport,
MN
US
With thousands of frame and mat samples, The Great Frame Up can satisfy any and all framing fantasies. The expert framespeople can make diplomas radiate (most diplomas can be framed for around $100–$200), personalized jerseys glisten (most for under $300), and dorm-room movie posters sparkle (many 24"x36" pieces are under $100). The design wizards can also find a home for any prized possession, such as shoebox photos, baby booties, ticket stubs, medals, and really good pot roasts. The Great Frame Up’s no-hassle guarantee and assurance that all work is done on site means your frameables won't be subject to mistreatment at underground commercial framing facilities.
4789 County Road 101
Minnetonka,
MN
US
In 1879, a lumber baron named Thomas Barlow Walker built an extra room onto his house. He mounted his 20 favorite paintings on the room's walls and opened it to the public. This private collection transformed into a public gallery with the founding of Walker Art Center in 1927. Over the following decades, the center's staff amassed a collection focused on modern art, gathering works from Pablo Picasso, Henry Moore, and Alberto Giacometti. Today, this permanent collection has expanded to encompass more than 11,000 modern and contemporary paintings, sculptures, and photographs, more than 800 film pieces, and more than 1,200 artists' books. In the whimsical multistory geometric helix of the Barnes building, seven cube-shaped galleries radiate from a central core on terrazzo floors and under lofted ceilings. Docents lead group tours through the galleries to see rotating exhibitions or play hide-and-seek with Jackson Pollock. Current exhibits have explored the contemporary still photography of Cindy Sherman, American avant-garde film from 1960 to 1973, and prints, paintings, and sculptures produced after 1989. Inside the museum's social spaces, docents also host artist talks, film screenings, and open houses. Designed as a contemporary twist on old European opera houses, the center's McGuire Theater draws visitors into its intimate space for live dance, theater, and music performances as well as performance art. Museum exhibits and events also spill outside to a central square and the four quadrants, bordered by granite and evergreen hedges, of the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. As visitors walk across its lawns, they can glimpse iconic modern sculptures, cross a 375-foot steel-and-wood footbridge, or watch staff teach plants to paint in the Cowles Conservatory.
1750 Hennepin Ave
Minneapolis,
MN
US
Originally the home of the Dakota and Ojibwe, Hennepin County began with the hopes and dreams of immigrants, New Englanders, and retired veterans. Why these entrepreneurs, farmers, laborers, craftsman, and vacationers decided to settle in what seemed to be a frigid, uninhabitable land is still a mystery, but their innovations and lineage are traced through the exhibits at Hennepin History Museum. The museum, located inside the historic George Christian mansion, hosts rotating exhibits and permanent collections that paint a picture of Midwestern life in the 19th and 20th centuries. From more recent decades, there are objects from Minneapolis Aquatennials and high-fashion clothes from downtown department stores such as Dayton's and Young-Quinlan. The Pillsbury Doughboy presides over it all, reminding guests of the importance of milling to the region's history. Photographs, personal papers, and atlases round out the collection, whose contents are further illuminated during the museum’s frequent events. Experts and authors, for instance, deliver talks in the museum’s intimate fireside room, whose fireplace keeps guests warm and prevents them from huddling in the museum's historical bear-skin rugs. In another tucked-away area, researchers and amateur historians pore through the material in the library, which is open to visitors 5 days a week, and in the archives, which is open by appointment. They might find maps of the region from the start of the 20th Century or old pictures of homes in the neighborhood, all steeped in memories and history.
2303 3rd Ave S
Minneapolis,
MN
US
When the Minneapolis Institute of Arts first opened its doors in 1915, it was the product of several decades of arts advocacy. A group of 25 citizens formed the Minneapolis Society of Fine Arts in 1883 with the goal of giving their community access to creative arts. More than a century later, this commitment to the community has taken the permanent collections from 800 works to close to 80,000 objects and has made the museum Minnesota's largest art educator. The collections, divided into seven curatorial areas, encompass a period of 5,000 years and hail from every corner of the world. The Asian Art collection represents 17 different Asian cultures, and Arts of Africa and the Americas holds more than 3,000 pieces of sculpture, basketry, painting, and beadwork. Temporary exhibitions bring collections of artwork from other institutions. The museum's interactive learning stations supplement understanding of topics such as modernism or 17th-century European painting with animation, video, and audio recordings.
2400 3rd Ave S
Minneapolis,
MN
US
Most students in introductory stained-glass-making classes are in search of a new hobby or a fun few hours, but not Connie Beckers. In 1995, she took such a course and soon built a career around the art of stained glass and kiln-working. Now, through The Goddess of Glass, she teaches others her craft during classes that cover the creation of jewelry, coasters, plates, and transparent overalls. She?s also been known to flex her instructional muscle as a guest artist on the DIY Network show I Hate my Kitchen, on the episode entitled Cramped Quarters, where she taught the show?s host and contractor how to make stained-glass tiles for a kitchen in the middle of remodeling. The Goddess of Glass also sells artwork and gifts out of a separate retail shop. Patrons can commission a custom piece, such as a stained-glass window, or peruse a collection of pieces by more than 80 local artisans. The shop?s staff can also advise clients who need custom framing, helping them to pick the proper matting and frame so that their Richard Nixon rookie cards really pop.
2205 North Lowry Avenue
Minneapolis,
MN
US
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