BBQ Restaurants in Mount Vernon

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When the Food Network’s Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives came to visit Mo Gridder’s BBQ, host Guy Fieri couldn’t get over that barbecue this delicious was being served in the parking lot of a Bronx auto-repair shop. But when, like Fred Donley, you’re both a head mechanic and a head chef, you have to keep your workplaces close together. Fred picked up BBQ as a hobby a few years back and started to bring in samples for his customers at the auto shop. Their rave reviews encouraged him to make it a part of his business. Now you’ll find a 35-foot cooking trailer in the parking lot and a dining area in a room where he used to service cars. On certain days, you can even get special deals that combine Fred’s two passions, such as a windshield replacement and a rack of ribs.

Despite its unusual setting, Mo Gridder’s still serves up barbecue “so good you’ll think you’re in Texas,” according to Fieri. Fred slow-cooks all his meats in a massive cooker, so whether it’s his signature pulled pork sandwiches, brisket, chicken, or ribs, it’s tender and juicy.

632 E 186th St
Bronx,
NY
US

At Palm's Portuguese barbecue, chefs prepare flame-kissed steaks and baby back ribs for diners to consume amid salmon-and-lime-green walls. While succulent lamb is prepared in the Middle Eastern rotisserie style, the kitchen's wood charcoal grill raises the temperature on 14-ounce rib eyes and tender pork chops. Postmeal, guests can indulge in a rice pudding or watch themselves in the wall-length mirrors as they slowly pour rice pudding onto their own forehead.

58 W Palisade Ave
Englewood,
NJ
US

Chicken Delight is open 363 days a year, closing only on Christmas and Thanksgiving. It's a good thing it's open almost every day, serving locals heaping servings of their golden-fried chicken, mac and cheese, buttery rolls, wings, and homemade coleslaw. Not to mention the cookie-crusted Oreo mousse cake, or the buckets of ribs pulled up daily from the restaurant's sauce well. Family specials stock multiple bellies at once with piles of chicken, ribs, shrimp, and sides, while lunch specials pair favorite foods into hearty single-servings.

7718 Bergenline Ave
North Bergen,
NJ
US

There is cooking, and then there is barbecuing. At Blind Boar BBQ, the chefs show their passion by seasoning meats with their signature rub and slowly smoking the spice-dusted cuts above a fire stoked with fragrant hickory and cherry woods. Platefuls of sliced brisket, pulled chicken, and ribs arrive at tables glazed with a house-made sauce of your choice, with one version even featuring a hint of Dr. Pepper. That same attention to detail is applied to the rest of the menu's southern comfort foods, too, such as the fried green tomatoes and the sides of cornbread, coleslaw, and mashed potatoes with gravy.

The dining room also shares the casual, down-home spirit of the restaurant's menu. Shadowboxes filled with everything from black-and-white photographs to golf clubs adorn the walls, and a ledge circling the dining area brims with scavenged goods, such as worn tires, stoneware jugs, and hay bales. The stout wooden tables and exposed ceiling beams complement the space's rustic charm, making it easy to relax while enjoying a cold beer from the draft list, which includes perennial favorites as well as domestic and imported craft microbrews.

595 Broadway
Norwood,
NJ
US

Yes, Hill Country is a restaurant, but no hostess will seat you and no server will come by to take your order. Instead, arriving patrons are given a meal ticket, which they carry into a Texas-style market. At one counter, they order meats by weight, watching as pitmasters pull their selection from smoking pits fueled with Texas post oak and the menus of lesser barbecue restaurants. The menu includes the signature moist brisket—juicy, fatty morsels that New York Times’ reporter Pete Wells is said to order a pound of every time because it shows “Hill Country’s rotisserie barbecue pits at their finest.” Whatever meat guests choose, it’s carved onto sturdy sheets of butcher paper they carry with them as they stop at additional counters to collect sides and desserts.

Though all meat is served with white bread or crackers, a lineup of sides includes corn pudding, Longhorn cheddar mac ‘n’ cheese, and sweet potato bourbon mash. The dessert case displays temptations such as banana pudding, which Wells gushed is “built upon a custard so thick with eggs and cream it brings Paris to mind.” Guests can return to the counters as many times as they like; each item ordered is noted on their ticket, which they turn in to the cashier at the end of the meal. The menu has some devoted culinary fans—renowned food critic Frank Bruni named Hill Country one of his five favorite restaurants, for instance—but the eatery attracts a musically inclined audience as well. Downstairs in the Boot Bar, a state-of-the-art stage hosts nationally touring blues, alt-country, and honky-tonk acts that have included Dale Wilson and Roseanne Cash. The shows take place Tuesday–Saturday nights, and are often free of charge.

30 West 26th Street
New York,
NY
US

At the center of the platters of miso-soaked steak, intricately marbled Kobe-style short ribs, garlic shrimp, and fresh veggies that crowd any given table at Gyu-Kaku sits a yakiniku grill, ready to bring all these flavors to life. At more than 700 locations worldwide, parties choose from a cornucopia of ingredients, tell their servers how they'd like them marinated—in sauces ranging from the strictly traditional to basil pesto—then begin searing their feast over the smokeless gas grill. New York magazine admired how "dominoes of harami skirt steak, marinated in sweet dark miso, turn caramelized and succulent on the hot grill." If protein overload looms, there are stone bowls of bibimbap and ramen to add balance. Patrons can wash down their meals with super-premium daiginjo sakes, sweet Japanese plum wines, and Asahi Super Dry beer, known to enhance its imbibers' deadpan witticisms.

805 3rd Ave
New York,
NY
US