Museums in Murfreesboro

25% Off Visit to Three Civil War Sites

The Carter House, Carnton Plantation, and Lotz House Museum

Multiple Locations

$40 $30

(294)

Visitors learn about the Civil War and the Battle of Franklin at three historical sites, including a museum with antiques and fine art

Lotz House Museum – 50% Off Visit

Lotz House Museum

Franklin

$30 $15

(719)

Relive the tribulations of the Lotz family in late November 1864, when they weathered the bloody battle of Franklin

Up to 50% Off at Historic Rock Castle

Historic Rock Castle

Hendersonville

$14 $8

The oldest building in Middle Tennessee, the Historic Rock Castle now houses numerous authentic period items, from quills to china

Up to 53% Off at Historic Railpark & Train Museum

Historic Railpark & Train Museum

Bowling Green

$75 $35

Self-guided or guided tours take you through railroad history with stops at restored train cars, exhibits, and a model train set

Up to 50% Off at the Bessie Smith Cultural Center

Bessie Smith Cultural Center

Downtown Chattanooga

$14 $7

Museum and performance hall named for blues legend Bessie Smith hosts educational exhibits and artistic events

Up to 43% Off at Reflection Riding Arboretum & Nature Center

Reflection Riding Arboretum & Nature Center

Lookout Valley - Lookout Mountain

$20 $12

(24)

Visitors explore 317 acres of forests and fields that are home to more than 50 native animal species, including endangered red wolves

Up to 45% Off at Museum Center at 5ive Points

Museum Center at 5ive Points

Cleveland

$10 $6

(6)

Learn about the history of the Ocoee region through permanent exhibits, or temporary exhibits about the Civil War or dirt track racing

Select Local Merchants

The Discovery Center enlivens kids’ learning experiences by cleverly disguising exhibits as awesome playtime arenas. Tiny tots and even 10-year-olds are encouraged to run wild at this hands-on children’s museum and nature center, trying their hand at the many fun activities.

At the creation station, which is stocked with paint, clay, chalk, paper, and just about anything a young da Vinci or police sketch artist needs, kids are free to unleash their creative potential. Alternatively, at the fire-truck exhibit, they can put on a firefighter’s boots and hat and climb aboard the full-sized 1954 Oren fire truck to learn about a firefighter’s job in Murfreesboro. Nearby, at Tennessee Live!, they can get in touch with their natural surroundings when they come face-to-face with turtles, fish, and snakes at the living stream table, dig in the fossil pit, and learn about the customs of the native Cherokee.

502 SE Broad St
Murfreesboro,
TN
US

On the evening of November 30, 1864, the town of Franklin, Tennessee, bore witness to more than five hours of carnage as Confederate forces under the command of General John Bell Hood assaulted an entrenched corps of Federal troops led by General John M. Schofield. The heaviest fighting entailed a frontal attack on the Federal lines—incorporating about 20,000 soldiers on each side, or more soldiers than Pickett's Charge at the Battle of Gettysburg. General Hood hoped this attack would dislodge the Federal forces and that he would be able to eventually recapture Nashville.

Over the course of the next five hours, this charge resulted in a staggering number of casualties and General Schofield steadily withdrew his forces toward Nashville, leaving behind a battle-scarred town as well as a battered Confederate force. Today, the Battle of Franklin Trust allows visitors to learn more about this key battle by visiting and taking guided tours of several sites that played integral roles in the events that took place on and around November 30, 1864.

The Carter House served as the command post for General Jacob D. Cox, a Federal officer tasked with overseeing the construction of defensive positions as the Confederate forces advanced. These defenses were constructed within 300 feet of the home, and guests have the opportunity to explore the grounds as well as the home, including the basement where the Carter family and roughly two dozen civilians sought shelter from the battle being fought outside their doors.

One of those civilians was Albert Lotz, whose own home still stands 110 steps away from the Carter residence. The Lotz House bears its own battle scars, too, including a charred indentation in the wood flooring that was caused by an errant cannonball.

Located one mile away from the two houses, the McGavock family's Carnton Plantation also welcomes guests, providing them with tours of the site that served as the area's largest field hospital after the fighting ceased. The plantation features two acres of land that the McGavocks offered as the final burial site for approximately 1,500 Confederate soldiers who died at the Battle of Franklin, making it the largest privately owned military cemetery in the nation.

1140 Columbia Ave
Franklin,
TN
US

Replete with ornate gardens and a brick mansion fronted by towering, white columns, Rippavilla Plantation winds the clock back to the time of the Civil War. In the fall, the smells of bonfires and steaming hot chocolate fill the sprawling grounds as they host pumpkin paintings and other old-timey, outdoor fun. The Rippavilla corn maze tests internal compasses and scarecrow-bribing techniques on a 10-acre, labyrinthine path. As they pass through the maze, guests encounter signs that boast historical facts about major Civil War battles in 1862, putting them in touch with the site's legacy. For a plus-size serving of fresh, autumn air, guests can also board the hayride to circle the grounds, which are devoid of the sinister ghouls that often emerge at many fall festivals; instead, the grounds remain family-friendly throughout the night.

5700 Main St
Spring Hill,
TN
US

A log cabin sits huddled in the woods as breezes sway rolling grasses and flowerbeds across the 1,120 acres that surround it. A Federal-style mansion stands tall against the sky, its columns flanking a towering front door and presidential balcony. Carrying on a 200-year tradition, The Hermitage tells the story of the presidential family, its plantation's slave population, and the atmosphere of the time through 32 historic buildings and more than a dozen archaeological sites.

The mansion and visitor center boast 3,000 original objects and 800,000 archaeological artifacts on display, as well as 1,200 printed items, 3,000 photographs, and 800 manuscripts bearing the president's original handwriting and cappuccino stains. The mansion's Greek-revival woodwork and mantels frame original wallpaper, and glass cases hold Andrew Jackson's authentic glasses, slippers, top hats, swords, and canes. Inside the visitor center, the Jacksons' actual private carriage guards a hallway leading to collections of artifacts from the plantation's slave families and communities. Most items in the collections were purchased directly from the Jackson family, though many artifacts were uncovered in the late 1800s by the historic Ladies' Hermitage Association when they broke ground for a new Olympic-sized swimming pool.

On the outdoor grounds, trained guides usher visitors to the first Hermitage, a log cabin where the Jackson family lived while the mansion was being built, and Alfred's Cabin, the preserved 1840s quarters of the former groundskeeper. In the garden, winding trails take visitors past period plants and the Grecian-style tombs of Andrew and Rachel Jackson. The rest of The Hermitage's grounds contain a network of winding walking trails, as well as grassy areas and cabins where museum staffers host events, weddings, and birthday parties. Across the grounds, interpreters in authentic period dress direct visitors to the sites of historic events and often train grade-school students to do the same through the center's special school programs.

4580 Rachels Ln
Hermitage,
TN
US

The Harding House at Belle Meade Plantation acquaints mouths and appetites with steaming local dishes, pairing every platter with a side of Southern hospitality and tradition. Under the same ownership as Bria Bistro Italiano and Whitfield’s Restaurant and Bar, The Harding House proffers a lunch and brunch menu replete with house spins on classic Nashville meals. Lunchgoers feast on classics just as holdable but more edible than a loved one's hand with the hand-breaded fried oyster po boy ($11), swaddled in herbed rémoulade atop a toasted baguette bed, and the fresh-ground, hand-pattied plantation burger ($8+). House specialties ($12–$17), favored by executive chef Tabor Luckey, include sautéed shrimp submerged in spiced Creole sauce and laid over a simmering bowl of cheese grits ($17). When Saturday arrives with its unique appetites in tow, The Harding House’s brunch offerings sate desires for all manners of sizzling skillets ($9–$13) and specialty breakfasts ($7–$15). The straight-shooting Enquirer skillet ($9) gathers the facts from a tomato, mushrooms, and two types of cheese before mingling them together with piping-hot eggs, home fries, and sultry pangs of hunger.

5025 Harding Pike
Nashville,
TN
US

Blistering every seat in the house with his scorching wit, actor, comedian, and author Tracy Morgan brings his inimitable act to the historic Ryman Auditorium for a special night of raucous, adult-only hysterics. Beloved for his roles on Saturday Night Live, 30 Rock, and in numerous films, Morgan serves up an obstreperous stand-up act sure to tickle even the most irascible ribs until they weep with joy. Tier 1 tickets (a $69.50 value) allow audience members to ogle the funnyman from front main-floor seats, including the front sides, as well as the front section of the balcony. Tier 2 seating (a $49.50 value) is further back on the main floor and balcony and also includes front and back seats on the extreme sides of the balcony but still provides a good view of the on-stage action. Every ticket comes with a glossy, limited-edition poster (a $15 value) of Tracy Morgan, a souvenir with the potential to turn a house into a home and a home into a stop on local walking tours.

116 5th Ave
Nashville,
TN
US