Sightseeing in Natchez

Select Local Merchants

West Baton Rouge Museum houses a chronological arsenal of artifacts and exhibits that represent Louisiana's rich history. In the Interest of Our Parish: Three Hundred Years of History in West Baton Rouge visually outlines the city's beginnings, from the building of river levees to a discussion of how the crawfish came to be the state bird. An outdoor neighborhood of six antique structures showcases historically decorated slave cabins plucked from the 19th-century Allendale Plantation, and the Reed Shotgun House opens its doors to provide patrons a peek at life as a 1938 migrant worker. The remainder of the museum's cache includes a model of a 1904 sugar mill and regular rotating exhibits, as well as a cash-crop garden and photogenic courtyard. Visiting families can opt to shuttle through the grounds with the informative lead of a museum tour guide or by following a careful trail of beignets from sight to sight.

845 N Jefferson Ave
Port Allen,
LA
US

Having given residential refuge to nine governors and their families, the Old Governor’s Mansion stands as one of the state’s foremost historical structures. Amble across floors once trampled by the feet of such men as governor and country-music legend Jimmie Davis, Governor O.K. Allen, and Governor Huey P. Long, the “Kingfish,” feared for his shrewd political skills and mighty mackerel militia. Some of the mansion’s most majestic spaces include the terrazzo-floored and crystal-chandeliered East Ballroom, once used to host visiting VIPs, and an opulent marble staircase, the site of marathon slinky races used to set tax policy. The library, completely coated in dark-wood paneling and a hard candy shell, features an enormous fireplace, as well as secret doors that lead to North Dakota.

502 North Blvd
Baton Rouge,
LA
US

The Enchanted Mansion whisks guests away to a storybook land of diminutive proportions, where fairies and first ladies alike commingle in a series of themed display rooms. Tucked into a picturesque Southern setting, the quaint mansion houses a diverse collection of hundreds of dolls dating back to the pre-Revolutionary era. The building’s deceptive three-story façade gives way to a single floor filled with oversized furnishings to promote tolerance for persecuted porcelain by making guests feel doll-sized themselves. Presidential dolls hold forth on foreign policy and puppet regimes in the White House room, and childlike figurines develop literacy in the storybook room as an antique collection watches proudly nearby.

190 Lee Dr
Baton Rouge,
LA
US

The LSU Museum of Art is more than a testament to visual art. It's also a testament to the beauty of its hometown, Baton Rouge, with huge windows offering panoramic views of the Mississippi River. Its galleries host a similarly impressive permanent collection, whose displays run the gamut from Chinese jade to treasures from the early days of the American arts and crafts movement. Rotating exhibits complement those mainstays. Going on now, The Visual Blues explores how blues and jazz music, dance, and social clubs inspired Harlem Renaissance artists.

100 Lafayette St
Baton Rouge,
LA
US

Offering BYOB art classes in a welcoming, instructor-assisted atmosphere, Corks N Canvas provides a laidback setting for self-expression. Participants will receive step-by-step instruction to craft striking artwork they can take home at the end of the session and place above their mantle, secret trap-door bookcase, or army-men-figurine reenactment of the battle of Pork Chop Hill. Choose among several sessions (click on the address of your chosen location to see a calendar of events) that teach budding strokesters to paint vibrant doggie portraits, landscapes, or abstract-expressionist renditions of the DMV. The creative paintventure may finally spark the dormant artist within that’s been reclusively hiding like Boo Radley since the finger-painting period.

711 Jefferson Hwy
Baton Rouge,
LA
US

What began as a small art association?originally assembled to organize an exhibit of local art?eventually blossomed into a full-scale museum as its art collection grew. Today, works by world-renowned artists share space with masterpieces by Mississippians in a museum committed to making the visual arts more accessible for the community at large.?

  • The Building: After decades in its original location, the museum was moved to a new space in 2007. A transparent door and entryway enables outsiders to see the visitors inside the space, a play on the museum's mission to make it a "museum without walls."

  • Permanent Mainstay: The Mississippi Story celebrates art by Mississippians and includes photos by Eudora Welty, 280 works by William Hollingsworth, and a collection of 77 quilts.

  • Don't Miss: 19th-century portraits by British artists Thomas Lawrence and Thomas Sully; works by master artists Picasso, Mir?, Chagall, and Rembrandt; as well as a collection of pre-Columbian artifacts.

In the Open Air: Outside the museum, take a stroll through the Art Garden, more than an acre of green space peppered with outdoor art installations and a performance stage.

  • Past Exhibits: Spacious Skies featured 14 painted or drawn landscapes culled from the permanent collections of such artists as John Sloan, Will Henry Rivers, Elaine Galen, as well as the museum's first painting, William P. Silva's The Shower.

  • Pro Tip: At the monthly workshop Look and Learn with Hoot, kids develop the skills for art literacy through an art activity and story time.

  • Special Programs: Almost 30 affiliate museums throughout the state regularly feature artwork from the museum's permanent collection.

201 East Pascagoula Street
Jackson,
MS
US