Tours in New Albany

Select Local Merchants

Discovered in 1883, Marengo Cave, a U.S. National Natural Landmark, is located roughly an hour from Louisville and is open 363 days a year. Showcasing eye-catching speleothems (cave deposits), visitors can browse a wide variety of soda straws, stalactites, flowstones, and draperies. The combo tour melds together a 70-minute Dripstone Trail Tour that’s one mile in length, as well as a 40-minute Crystal Palace Tour that guides groups past eye-catching flowstone deposits. Embark on an exciting mini-journey into the earth’s depths without ending up at its core.

400 Route 64
Marengo,
IN
US

The gruesome origin of the Rails of Death begins on Halloween night, 1952, when a passenger train traveling from New York to Los Angeles derailed, killing everyone on board. After the accident, rumors began to spread through New Albany that a mass murderer was among the deceased passengers—and that his spirit still haunted the tracks, a demon thirsty for blood and travel-size bags of pretzels. Every year during the Halloween season, the site's undead souls awaken, frightening visitors as the grounds shake beneath the wheels of a rumbling train.

1533 Highway 111
New Albany,
Indiana
US

At Drive-In of Terror, visitors are lulled into a false sense of security as they enjoy a drive-in movie and a complimentary bag of popcorn. But after the credits roll, they traverse the attraction's more than 6 acres of spooky sights, which are designed to give visitors a fright that won't cause any lasting damage. The organizers put together such PG-13 scares as possessed scarecrows, a parade of costumed characters, and inexplicably seedless pumpkins.

8200 Highway 64
Georgetown,
IN
US

Indian Creek Winery came to be as the result of a 15-day road trip embarked upon by Mark Kendall and his wife. As the couple drove across the Southeast, they visited every winery they found between Alabama and Virginia Beach. At the trip's end, they'd acquired the inspiration to plant their own grapevines on Georgetown soil. Since then, they've developed wines that range from a three-wine blend called Dry Creek Red to a riesling sweet enough to make honey glow the envious green of a lovelorn alien. Visitors to the winery can take a seat indoors, or outdoors amid scenic views and live music, to pair red and white sips with platters of cheeses, summer sausage, and dried fruit.

6491 County Line Rd NE
Georgetown,
IN
US

Turtle Run Winery’s founders Laura and Jim Pfeiffer create sippable bliss through a thoughtful process of fruit fermentation. The three-hour tasting and tutorial explains the intricacies of aperitifs, highlighting the importance of color, aroma, and balance, and demystifying differently shaped glasses. Taste-testers will swirl more than 20 offerings, comparing internationals and domestics to Turtle Run’s own varieties, followed by a dinner paired with course-complimenting libations. Hosts will also cover the science of wine making, explaining the alchemy and series of top hats involved in turning table grapes into top-notch vino.

940 Saint Peters Church Rd NE
Corydon,
IN
US

When Simon Huber arrived in southern Indiana from Baden-Baden, Germany in 1843, he knew how to do two things particularly well: grow fruit and make wine. What started out as Simon's humble, 80-acre operation, today stretches across more than 600 acres as one of the state's oldest wineries. It remains a family business, too, with seventh-generation Hubers at the helm.

Open seven days per week, 12 months a year, the facility features u-pick fruits and veggies, a bakery, a cafe, and even a family farm park. All of this activity bustles above the wine cellar, which resides underground beneath the Huber's restored 1938 barn. There, the family transforms 18 different varieties of grapes into award-winning wines, combining modern equipment with old-world winemaking techniques.

19816 Huber Rd.
Borden,
IN
US