Thai Restaurants in New London

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East-West Grille serves a plethora of pan-Asian eats from menus that spotlight Laotian and Thai cuisine. Laotian options include sausage, stews, fried rice, and spiced meats such as the larb-gai, minced grilled chicken breast bathing in lime juice and seasoned with ginger, scallions, cilantro, and bean sprouts ($9.95 for lunch; $11.95 for dinner). The mangkham salad meshes protein and greens in a tastier alternative to watering your vegetable garden with egg whites, with your choice of chicken, pork, or shrimp comingling with lettuce, herbs, nuts, tomatoes, and noodles ($7.50 for lunch; $8.95 for dinner).

526 New Park Ave
West Hartford,
CT
US

Thai Hut's chefs ignite taste buds with a menu of traditional Thai fare, spicing seafood, duck, and beef with zesty sauces in a choice of four heat levels. Couples can warm up their palates on an appetizer of chicken satay paired with peanut sauce or the Money Bag, deep-fried parcels of prawn, chicken, corn, and peas used to pay off grumbling tummies. A pair of Thai Hut salads clears out leftover flavors with crispy vegetables and a delectable dressing of peanut sauce. A broad array of entrees encourages diners to select the ingredients and spice levels in any dish, such as letting fans of thai basil mix the dish’s eponymous herb, green beans, and bell peppers with a choice of seafood, chicken, beef, or duck. A plate of pad thai hides eggs, peanuts, and bean sprouts in a labyrinth of fried noodles, and spicy red or green curry tempers tongue-tingling heat with cool notes of coconut milk, bamboo shoots, and scales from Rhapsody in Blue. Ornate touches, such as tablecloths zigzagged with intricate patterns, bright flowers, and a rich wood bar, make for an elegant atmosphere in the dining room.

181 Main Street
Southington,
CT
US

With recipes that call to mind the towering spires of the Khmer Empire’s antique capital, the chef at Angkor Restaurant recreates modern Cambodia’s favorite dishes. Nam yaa, the restaurant's most popular dish, is also known as medicine soup for the restorative qualities of its lemongrass, ginger, and garlic and the tradition of serving it in a tiny childproof bottle. Distinct Cambodian sauces, such as tamarind and spicy garlic, douse crispy fish, and peanut sauce tops banh hoi, whose steamed noodles are accompanied by lettuce and mint.

10 Traverse St
Providence,
RI
US

Red curry, green curry, mango curry?at Pakarang Restaurant, who's celebrating their 20th anniversary this year? the kitchen crafts nine different fragrant curries in varying levels of heat, in which chicken, beef, or seafood simmer. Specialty dishes include the bangkok beef and crispy duck. All the cuisine is artfully made, matching the casual yet modern, underwater-themed decor that includes dark-stained wood floors and mottled walls.

303 S Main St
Providence,
RI
US

At Gourmet House Restaurant, the culinary traditions of China, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Thailand unite in one diverse but harmonious menu. Kitchen staff prepare eclectic noodle dishes such as crispy Shanghai-style noodles, pad thai, and Vietnamese-style bowls swimming with basil, coconut milk, and peanut sauce. The chefs' creativity shines through in various house specialties, which range from a sweet duck in tamarind sauce to spicy fried ginger scallops. The menu also features an array of vegetarian cuisine.

787 Hope Street
Providence,
RI
US

Apsara Asian's chefs prepare dishes that range from American-fusion favorites such as saucy chicken wings to classic Cambodian recipes. Such specialties include the nime chow: a fresh spring roll of vegetables and cooked shrimp with a deep bowl of peanut sauce for dipping or using to sign a check. Beyond the white paper, though, most everything else in the restaurant is gold, starting with the tasseled tablecloths and continuing up to the elaborate metallic molding along the ceiling.

716 Public St
Providence,
RI
US