Kids Activities in New Orleans


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At the Vieux Carré, New Orleans' famous 85-block French Quarter, modern-day visitors moving in and out of National Historic Landmark properties are transported to city's past while taking in the mishmash of architectural styles distinguished by colorful facades and filigreed iron galleries and balconies. The restored landmark property known as the Gallier House makes its home in the Quarter, waiting to dazzle with the 19th-century splendor that backdropped the lives of their inhabitants—a diverse crew of enslaved workers, tycoons, free people of color, architects, and robots—more than a century ago. The Gallier House was built in 1860 by renowned architect James Gallier Jr., who also designed the old French Opera House and Municipality Hall (now Gallier Hall). Gallier ensured the house was ahead of its time by installing a bathroom with indoor plumbing, a ventilation system to circulate air, an attached kitchen, and a hologram butler. The fully furnished two-story house also contains a courtyard, carriageway, and slave quarters, and it inspired Louis and Lestat's New Orleans residence in Interview with the Vampire by Anne Rice. In 1996, The Woman's Exchange bought the property, ensuring that it would be preserved as a museum and historic landmark. Today, curators illuminate the mansion’s history through frequent exhibits and educational programs for people of all ages.
1132 Royal St.
New Orleans,
LA
US
Witches Brew Tours guide groups through a variety of tours that showcase angles of the haunts and mysteries of the French Quarter, where spirits, witches, voodoo, and vampires dwell. Fully licensed guides tell tales of vengeful ghosts and the history of Marie Laveau, the Queen of Voodoo. Guests can participate in walking or mule-drawn-carriage tours through the city?s winding streets or the maze of mausoleums at St. Louis Cemetery No. 1.
800 Decatur Street
New Orleans,
LA
US
During one-on-one sessions, pupils progress through a series of techniques of steadily increasing difficulty, from learning to lunge to developing an independent seat, atop the ranch's resident steed, Percy Walker—a gentle, patient tennessee walker descended from world grand champions on both sides of his pedigree.
813 7th St
New Orleans,
LA
US
An eclectic mix of modern musicians and other entertainers descends upon the venue confines for a night of dance, music, eats, and entertainment at the Voodoo Arts & Music Experience 2012 during Halloween weekend. More than 100,000 fans annually attend the three-day festival, which combines rocking band performances with acrobatic spectacles, carnival rides, large-scale interactive art, and seminars discussing potential tax-code provisions. Though the 2012 lineup is still incubating, past Voodoo rosters have showcased performers such as Rage Against the Machine, Muse, Eminem, Ozzy Osbourne, Snoop Dogg, Girl Talk, and Deadmau5, and a plethora of local artists. VIP pass brandishers sate their aural and optic appetites with three days of acts and can indulge in a slew of other benefits. Besides enjoying unlimited carnival rides, a personal herald announces one's arrival every time they travel to the restroom.
1 Palm Drive
New Orleans,
LA
US
With its imposing, slate-gray façade, the 170-year-old U.S. Custom House may be the last building in which you’d expect to hear the delighted squeals of children. But behind the steely columns, the building erupts into 23,000 square feet of colorful displays and fluttering, scuttling insects, courtesy of the Audubon Society and Insectarium. In the Asian garden, hundreds of butterflies dodge shafts of sunlight to alight on tropical ferns and the shoulders of young visitors. And at the Insects of New Orleans gallery, visitors can ogle the pink katydids, cockroaches, and lovebugs that contribute to the city’s heritage. These bug-filled displays are all part of the insectarium’s mission to conserve Louisiana’s indigenous species and inspire stewardship in its visitors. While adults can sate their curiosity with the vast array of exotic species, curators gear many displays toward young guests by making them lighthearted and interactive: the Field Camp’s entomologist answers questions about how to collect bugs or break up flea-circus strikes, and at Bug Appétit, chefs dole out insect-filled delicacies to adventurous palates.
423 Canal Street
New Orleans,
LA
US
Starting at the elegant white columns at the New Orleans African American Museum, the Tremé walking tour shepherds groups of up to 23 wanderers through the culturally significant neighborhood. For two hours every Monday, Friday, and Saturday, guests traipse through 300 years of richly saturated history, learning more effectively than sipping the contents of a blender full of history textbooks. Patrons tread across original handmade bricks that cover the ground in parts of one of the oldest African American communities. They also meander through Congo Square and St. Augustine Church as the knowledgeable guide sprinkles in anecdotes about the rise of jazz, creole architecture, and the New Orleans civil-rights movement.
1418 Governor Nicholls Street
New Orleans,
LA
US
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