Sightseeing in New Orleans


Select Local Merchants

Pirates. Supernatural phenomena. Gruesome crimes. The guides from Dark Crescent Tours unveil New Orleans' more macabre side while narrating the city's storied past. In the late afternoons and early evenings, the guides lead outings that visit sites associated with the eerier and more chilling facets of the city's long-distant past. The specialty walking tours provide an immersive look at the former homes of famous New Orleans authors or even interesting bars where each stop includes information about that particular establishment's history or legacy in some way. Daytime walking tours, on the other hand, spirit folks through iconic neighborhoods, including Algiers Point, the French Quarter, and Faubourg Marigny. During the jaunts, guides relate the history behind everything from the distinctive architecture and the street names to the reason why none of the sidewalks are edible.
515 Saint Philip Street
New Orleans,
LA
US
Do you enjoy the wonders of nature? If so, you'll adore the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, LA. In addition to a diverse wildlife that focus on different continents (like the African Savanna and Asian Domain), there's an aviary for bird fans and the Dinosaur Adventure for dino lovers. And if your legs get tired, you can always jump aboard the Swamp Train for a picturesque trip of the Zoo. You’ll never go hungry here either since there are more than ten concession stands or cafés. Plus, during the warmer months, kids can hang out at the 'Cool Zoo' splash park as a fun way to escape the heat. Whether you come for a day or get a membership with yearlong park privilege (and special discounts), the Audubon Zoo is the perfect place for family fun.
6500 Magazine Street
New Orleans,
LA
US
Even unbelievers can glean some new knowledge from Magic Tours. Professors, historians, and journalists are among the guides that lead the cemetery and ghost tours, so they're not only spooky, but also historically accurate. And since New Orleans has a reputation for its cemeteries and outlandish burial customs, they have plenty of facts to spill on each tour. The oldest haunt they explore is the Saint Louis Cemetery, which has been open for business since 1789. Over the past two centuries, thousands of locals?famous and anonymous?have come to their final rest there, including legendary voodoo practitioner Marie Laveau.
441 Royal Street
New Orleans,
LA
US
Since 1924, Gray Line Tours has introduced guests to the sights of New Orleans through an eclectic collection of tours, from leisurely walking tours to heart-pounding ghost tours. In addition to taking immersive history or plantation tours, participants can climb aboard an authentic steamboat, which preserves its engine room and original cartoon-mouse captain in a museum-quality exhibit, for a dinner jazz cruise.
Toulouse St Wharf, 400 N Peter St
New Orleans,
LA
US
With its imposing, slate-gray façade, the 170-year-old U.S. Custom House may be the last building in which you’d expect to hear the delighted squeals of children. But behind the steely columns, the building erupts into 23,000 square feet of colorful displays and fluttering, scuttling insects, courtesy of the Audubon Society and Insectarium. In the Asian garden, hundreds of butterflies dodge shafts of sunlight to alight on tropical ferns and the shoulders of young visitors. And at the Insects of New Orleans gallery, visitors can ogle the pink katydids, cockroaches, and lovebugs that contribute to the city’s heritage. These bug-filled displays are all part of the insectarium’s mission to conserve Louisiana’s indigenous species and inspire stewardship in its visitors. While adults can sate their curiosity with the vast array of exotic species, curators gear many displays toward young guests by making them lighthearted and interactive: the Field Camp’s entomologist answers questions about how to collect bugs or break up flea-circus strikes, and at Bug Appétit, chefs dole out insect-filled delicacies to adventurous palates.
423 Canal Street
New Orleans,
LA
US
Preservation is as much a priority as presentation at LeMieux Galleries, which is why the displays that the shop crafts from thousands of frames and acid-free mats often involve leaving a buffer of air between delicate paintings and glass. Framers there ensure that stolen copies of the Declaration of Independence can be secretly enjoyed for generations to come with their careful framing techniques, which can preserve the natural edge of paper and safeguard the stitches of antique needlework. In more than a quarter century in the business, the store has displayed everything from souvenir magazines to jerseys within their frames, the styles of which range from sleek contemporary to the ornate gold moulding that grows unbidden in French palaces. LeMieux Galleries also exhibits sculptures, paintings, and ceramics by artists from the Gulf South.
332 Julia Street
New Orleans,
LA
US
Advertisement