Movies in New York City


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Based in the West Village, Film Forum is an autonomous non-profit cinema house that has the wonderful distinction of being open for more than four decades. The theater’s three screens run a variety of American independent features and foreign art films every day of the year, and curates in-house film festivals, documentary showings and retrospectives as well. These special events often bring writers, directors, filmmakers and authors to the stage for lectures and Q & A sessions, which can render the fewer than 200-seat spaces a bit cramped at times. But for the cinematically passionate, Film Forum remains a mecca of quality film screenings and rare archival showings, all run by a core group of buffs and hobbyists who truly enjoy the work they do.
209 W Houston St
New York,
NY
US
Located in a former fire station, this cinema in Greenwich Village is the neighborhood’s longest running. Since 1963, Cinema Village has survived on a steady diet of art-house and indie programming, which has included documentaries, animation, cult classics, foreign films and festival screenings. Now decked out for the digital era, the three screens continue to play to audiences of up to 156 inside the tight, spartan theaters. But the lack of creature comforts matters little to the dedicated patrons who come for the shows they can’t get anywhere else in the city. And should you arrive too early to grab a seat, waiting space is always available in the small, dim downstairs lounge.
22 E 12th St
New York,
NY
US
Originally called the Austin, this vintage 1930s theater has seen several ups and downs in its history, from years as a second-run double-feature house to a red-tinted stint that got it shut down by the city. In its current incarnation, the Kew Gardens Cinemas flaunts restored art-deco flair alongside modern projectors and molar-rocking surround sound. Stadium seating and a fully stocked concession stand further complement current flicks by granting every set of eyes a great view and every set of dental braces something to hold during scary scenes. Swing by the theater with a friend to snack on your own small popcorns (a $5 value each) and sip sodas (a $3.50 value each) while enjoying a vintage movie-viewing experience that beats watching Betamax tapes on your Great Uncle Vinnie's 1978 Zenith.
265 Court St
Brooklyn,
NY
US
Situated on the mezzanine level of Lincoln Center, opposite 65th street from the Metropolitan Opera House, the Walter Reade Theater is the city’s premiere destination for curated foreign art, rare and off-beat film presentations. The Film Society of Lincoln Center uses the Walter Reade Theater to screen an average of four films a day, often curating the shows around directors, national film schools and various film styles, as well as more esoteric themes. The well-appointed theater seats more than two hundred and fifty patrons, each with plush seats and great sightlines to the screen. A stage area in front also frequently accommodates speakers, including popular Q & A sessions with directors, writers and actors during special screenings. An art gallery off the entryway exhibits any array of cinematic art, including rare movie posters.
165 W 65th St
New York,
NY
US
It’s fitting that the building now home to the IFC Center in Greenwich Village began its life as a church in the 19th century. The reverence its management and audience pay to cinema seems just as spiritual, and is apparent seven days a week in the five cinemas inside the space, showing both HD digital and 35 mm films. The programs at the IFC Center are a large part of the attraction, with everything from classics, cult films and shorts, to independent features, foreign language masterpieces and documentaries. In addition, entertainment insiders from Michael Cera to Michael Moore often stop by for question and answer sessions with the enthusiastic crowds. Don’t expect IMAX-quality screens or seating at IFC Center, though. Just quality cinema in a historic building, served with a side of organic popcorn and – gasp! – real butter.
323 Avenue Of The Americas
New York,
NY
US
Israel Film Center’s name says it all. The establishment corrals Israeli-themed films to promote and expand the country’s presence in the world of cinema. The center’s library of feature films, short films, television shows, and documentaries gives members easy access to home screenings without requiring a working knowledge of the Dewey Decimal System. Meanwhile, the Jewish Community Center in Manhattan brings many of these to the big screen and provides educational opportunities through classes and online materials. The center also sponsors a film festival that rolls out its diverse lineup of flicks over eight days at venues throughout the city.
334 Amsterdam Avenue
New York,
NY
US
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