Symphony in New York City


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Hershey Theatre

The Hershey Theatre, conceived in 1933 by noted philanthropist and chocolatier Milton S. Hershey, stands as an opulent tribute to the performing arts. Taking architectural cues from Saint Mark’s Basilica in Venice, the foyer’s towering arches gleam with golden paint and crystal chandeliers. The blue-and-gold mosaic that leads to the main seating area is the masterwork of two German artists who spent two years on its construction. Once inside the theater, audiences might think they’ve stepped onto the streets of Venice thanks to the atmospheric ceiling, stonework facades, and gondoliers paddling them to their seats. ####Bethel Woods Center for the Arts Music has permeated the 800 manicured acres where the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts has stood since 1969, when farmer Max Yasgur agreed to let love, peace, and harmony grow wild at the very first Woodstock festival. These days, the renowned outdoor venue and cultural center continues to attract the biggest acts in music to its pavilion stage. The open-air design ensures ample ventilation on the natural sloping lawn, and a roof protects up to 15,000 fans from inclement weather and the prying eyes of Cessna pilots.

127 East 23rd Street
New York,
NY
US

Before the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts was even built, the idea for its Chamber Music Society was born. American composer and Lincoln Center President William Schuman helped specially design a recital hall in which the chamber group could play more than three centuries worth of musical compositions. But the Chamber Music Society didn't stay contained within its venue. Throughout the following half century, its musicians collaborated with dance companies, jazz projects, and festivals, helping to spread awareness and appreciation of their craft throughout the city.

10 Lincoln Center Plaza
New York,
NY
US

Experience the exciting rhythms of the ancestral Taiko and the magical sounds of the bamboo flutes. Taikoza uses the powerful rhythms of the Taiko drums to create an electrifying energy that carries audiences in a new dimension of excitement. Taikoza draws from Japan's rich tradition of music and performance.

2537 Broadway
New York,
NY
US

With 3,000 events produced each year, Lincoln Center is both a place to catch must-see performances and a go-to for last-minute date ideas. In its various halls, you and your main squeeze can almost always catch a ballet, opera, jazz performance, or practically anything else that happens on a stage.

70 Lincoln Center Plaza
New York,
NY
US

Amid the golden accents and ivory hues of the Carnegie Hall's Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage, Dr. Brad Holmes, who led the Millikin University Choir to the ACDA's 2011 National Conference, guides audiences through psalms and folk songs spanning a timeframe from the Renaissance to today. The Millikin University Choir's 55 students begin the evening by performing contemporary composer John Rutter's take on Cantate Domino, followed closely by soprano soloist Sarah O'Neill stepping up to sing Ericks Ešenvalds's layered choral arrangement of "Amazing Grace." Dr. Holmes then turns his baton to the National Festival Chorus, which sings through classic works by Handel, Brunner, and Stroope to warm hearts and rekindle memories of wild nights on the a capella circuit.

881 9th Ave
New York,
NY
US

The Chamber Orchestra of New York preserves ancient music with a repertoire of rarely performed gems enacted by an ensemble of young professional musicians. Set in the acoustical sweet spot of the landmark Church of St. Jean Baptiste, the Music Under the Dome series continues with "Baroque Garden of Roses," an aural smorgasbord of rediscovered suites and oratorios to satisfy casual classical fans and hardcore musical archeologists alike. Gustav Holst’s bouncing St. Paul Suite starts the show, followed by Edward Elgar’s Sospiri, an evocative, sentimental piece. Next, organist Kyler Brown premieres Respighi’s Suite for Organ and Strings, a lost composition recently discovered in aisle three of an underwater Walgreens. Mr. Brown, The Virgin Consort, and the Chamber Orchestra then hold hands with Maestro Di Vittorio to unveil "The Garden of Roses," a hot-off-the-presses oratorio by Alessandro Scarlatti. Endorsed by Italian mezzo-soprano superstar and notary public Cecilia Bartoli, the madrigal-like arias of "The Garden of Roses" envelop audiences in waves of ethereal vocals.

184 East 76th Street
New York,
NY
US