Pubs in Tribeca

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The rear of Tribeca Tap House's bar looks like it's survived since colonial times, with thick planks of aged wood sunk into the brick wall. The bar itself stands in contrast, sporting a clean, modern design that includes tap handles mounted on polished metal. It's a fitting image for a restaurant that sticks to the basics of a neighborhood watering hole—namely cold drafts and hot food—and then elevates them with a heavy selection of craft beers and New American gastropub dishes.

The all-day menu tempts patrons with specialties such as crispy shrimp ‘n’ chips and the Tap House burger, a ground-in-house blend of sirloin, chuck, and brisket. The chefs' sandwiching skills continue to shine in more complex assemblages as well, such as the short-rib grilled cheese, which enfolds wild mushrooms, caramelized onions, and chipotle gouda on texas toast. And no pub meal is complete without a fried appetizer, of which Tribeca Tap House has many, including cornmeal-crusted pickle chips—frickles—accompanied by ranch sauce. Bartenders pour more than 20 draft beers at any time, keeping guests cool and calm as they watch sports games on one of many flat-screen televisions. The surrounding decor is heavy on rustic wood and brick, although works from local artists interject the handsome earth tones with pops of color.

365 Greenwich St
New York,
NY
US

A barrow boy pushes his cart past horse-drawn carriages, police on horseback, and a lady on a stroll, parasol in hand. This historical scene, appropriately tinted in sepia, hangs above diners at Pound & Pence, where it's one of two 10-foot murals that depict lively streets and pubs in 19th-century England.

Although Pound & Pence's proprietors can't re-create the days of Dickens on all New York's streets, they do conjure an old-time vibe inside their establishment.

Vintage Spirit

Dark woodwork, chairs and benches with floral upholstery, and historic English memorabilia contribute to the space's refined, yet lived-in vibe. A grand staircase in the center of the space leads visitors to a level that feels more like a parlor than a pub, complete with leather wingback chairs, a fireplace, and a pool table lined with bright-purple felt.

New York magazine praised the pub's ability to exude refinement without feeling stuffy, noting that Pound & Pence, "lacks most of its district?s pretense and feels downright humble."

International Pub Cooking

Pound & Pence's British roots are apparent throughout the menu as well. In addition to serving classic pub staples?including chicken tikka masala and shepherd's pie?the staff also ensures that the shelves remain stocked with a healthy selection of English gins, single-malt scotches, and cognacs.

However, not every dish is steeped in British tradition. Items such as the cheddar-stuffed jalape?o poppers and the 10-ounce certified Angus burger topped with applewood bacon, barbecue sauce, and crispy onion strings showcase some of the menu's more contemporary American influences.

55 Liberty St.
New York,
NY
US

Paying homage to the financial offices nearby, a giant white bull statue guards the dining room, where traders and other diners slip into red booths. Here, they share boards of imported and domestic artisanal cheese, which precede steak frites or Bailey Burgers with applewood-smoked bacon.

52 William Street
New York,
NY
US

The city of Nelson is literally a world away from the hum and hubbub of Manhattan. It sits under cerulean skies on the northern shore of New Zealand’s South Island, its residents epitomizing a laid-back attitude seen so rarely on New York’s crowded streets. As Nelson Blue's self-proclaimed "resident Kiwi," Pauli Morgan doesn’t seem to mind that he’s a bit of an anomaly. When he opened the restaurant and bar in the heart of the Financial District, he wanted to capture everything that he missed about his former home: the company, the cuisine, and the creativity. With the help of chef Eric Lind, he has done just that. New Zealand–inspired lamb skewers and grilled squid share the menu with savory beef pies from nearby Down Under Bakery. Morgan also props up his homeland’s economy by importing many of Nelson Blue’s beers and condiments directly from New Zealand. Homesick Kiwis can find solace in a pint of Moa beer or a glass filled with Wattie’s Tomato Sauce as they take in views of the Brooklyn Bridge from the bar’s patio.

235 Front Street
New York,
NY
US

At The Malt House, signature Black Angus Burger arrives fully loaded with applewood bacon, roasted cherry tomatoes, pickled red onion and queso sauce, alongside fried-chicken sandwiches, tempura pickles, and stuffed french toast. In addition to a full bar?which serves up drinks such as the Maltmosa, a blend of wheat beer, orange juice, and champagne?draughts have included craft beers from breweries such as Sierra Nevada and Ommegang. Patrons can find seating at a long bar lit by dangling bulbs, at high-topped tables angled at a sports-displaying television, or on a sidewalk patio.

206 Thompson St
New York,
NY
US

Outfitted to resemble a one-room schoolhouse, with beer lists on blackboards and wooden pegs for hanging coats, Nolita House provides an education in simple, affordable, seasonal dining. Learn how far a crispy panko crust can elevate classic mac 'n' cheese ($12 for the large plate or $8 for the small) or study the intersection of the delicious and the porcine with babyback ribs ($9). Forge a guardian's signature and take your tongue on an international field trip with Nolita's shrimp tacos ($16) or miso-saki-glazed cod ($18). Small varietal wines from boutique vineyards pair nicely with an olive plate ($3), arguments over roller-derby statistics, or cheeses, especially at Nolita's Wine and Cheese Happy Hours, held every night between 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. ($12 for two cheeses and a glass of wine).

47 E Houston St
New York,
NY
US