Symphony in Union Square

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Designated a city landmark in 2008, Webster Hall was named Nightclub of the Year in 2011 by Nightclub & Bar magazine and called the “jewel of the Village” by Nobel laureate Eugene O’Neill. First opened in 1886, its iconic framework has hosted such major acts as Prince and Mick Jagger, and served as a speakeasy, a lecture hall, and a mentor to troubled teenage buildings. Today, live shows performed by stars such as Kanye West and Alicia Keys take place in the Grand Ballroom, which is equipped with state-of-the-art acoustics and cutting-edge audio-visual equipment. In addition, the venue hosts weekly dance-club nights, the official NYC Halloween Parade Afterparty, and an annual New Year’s Eve Ball.

125 East 11th Street
Manhattan,
New York
US

Kenneth Donald Rogers—an American country-music star, photographer, producer, actor, and fellow with a nice beard—has won three Grammys and more than a dozen American Music Awards for his sweet, stirring crooning. Though he won't be toting his dozens of awards, Mr. Rogers will be bringing an impressive showcase of selections from his extensive collection of country hits. To prep the crowd for the main event, The Herndon Brothers—a local act lead by Ray Herndon, a country star known for livin' the dream—will layer the crowd in hometown vibes from their wide library of inspiring and honest tracks.

127 E 23rd St
New York,
NY
US

For more than half a century the American Symphony Orchestra has hewn to founder Leopold Stokowski's original vision: "to offer concerts of great music within the means of everyone." That means its shows aren't just financially affordable, they're also demystified by conductor lectures and never held inside biodomes. In recent years, the organization has added a new facet to its time-tested strategy: curated concerts built around a theme. Shows might explore a particular place and time, examine a literary motif, or delve into the interaction between music and visual art. This strategy has attracted a lot of attention, and not just from audiences: such greats as Yo-Yo Ma, Deborah Voigt, Sarah Chang, and Carnegie Hall's mask-wearing Phantoms of the Barbershop Quartet have all vied to play with the Orchestra.

263 W 38th St
New York,
NY
US

The Greek Theatre, one of Los Angeles' most iconic music venues, was built in 1929 as a gift from wealthy immigrant Griffith J. Griffith, who wanted to give back to his adopted city. With a stage that evokes an ancient Hellenistic theater, modern sound systems, and clear sightlines, the venue combines old and new, much like cell phones made of Nintendo controllers.

208 W 41st St
New York,
NY
US

Classical favorites and the premiere of modern compositions fly from the fingers of acclaimed pianist Jenny Q Chai, who scooped first prize for solo contemporary piano at last year’s Keys to the Future festival. At Carnegie Hall, she'll revisit the Ligeti étude that carried her to victory in a performance the New York Times acclaimed for its “rich tone and rhythmic clarity.”

158 West 58th Street
New York,
NY
US

Amid the golden accents and ivory hues of the Carnegie Hall's Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage, Dr. Brad Holmes, who led the Millikin University Choir to the ACDA's 2011 National Conference, guides audiences through psalms and folk songs spanning a timeframe from the Renaissance to today. The Millikin University Choir's 55 students begin the evening by performing contemporary composer John Rutter's take on Cantate Domino, followed closely by soprano soloist Sarah O'Neill stepping up to sing Ericks Ešenvalds's layered choral arrangement of "Amazing Grace." Dr. Holmes then turns his baton to the National Festival Chorus, which sings through classic works by Handel, Brunner, and Stroope to warm hearts and rekindle memories of wild nights on the a capella circuit.

881 9th Ave
New York,
NY
US