Beer, Wine & Spirits in New York

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Mason Jar assuages appetites with a menu of artfully constructed comfort cuisine augmented by a diverse selection of primo potables. Kick off the flavor parade with an order of wings slathered in pomegranate-garlic or bourbon-chipotle sauce ($9), or opt for a starter of spinach and artichoke dip, which, like most Louisiana mayors, comes crowned with andouille sausage and bacon ($10). An english-muffin burger comes topped with a fried egg, bacon, and caramelized onions ($13), and mac 'n' cheese uses beer cheese sauce and panko bread crumbs to prove elbow macaroni is more than just an elegant art medium ($12). 'Cue connoisseurs can choose from a variety of smoke-steeped savories, from full racks of baby back ribs ($20), to sliced brisket ($18), to beer-can chicken ($21). A modified lunch menu and weekends-only brunch menu give solar-powered robots a break from their steady diet of microchips and high-octane petrol-smoothies.

45 E 30th St
New York,
NY
US

"I feel a little like a detective," reveals Luke Johnson, overseer of the cheese cave at Stinky Bklyn, to the New York Times. He continues, "I…try to steer people toward something new. If they say they don't like goat, I really push the goat because people don't realize there are so many varieties." And push they do. Staff members pass indulgent segments of their carefully aged cheeses, offering approachable wisdom to novices and a wide-ranging selection for aficionados. The charming Smith Street institution has opened a new location between Baltic and Butler, with fridges and pantries stocked with international morsels such as chocolates, oils, vinegars, and beer, as well as an impressive ham bar.

Visitors can request a peak at the temperature- and humidity-controlled cheese cave, where Luke and staff nurture each wheel through distinct aging processes. Cheeses dwell within the cavern for anywhere from a few days to a few years, undergoing washing, soaking in beer or brine, and the opportunity to view culturally enriching cave paintings. Owners Patrick Watson, Michele Pravda, and Chris Remy also added a green garden and patio behind the shop, providing an ideal place for tastings or a peaceful spot for enjoying one of the shop's artisan sandwiches.

282 Smith St
Brooklyn,
NY
US

Little Shop of Crafts may have "little" in its name, but the creative opportunities that the DIY art center offers are anything but. Bisque pottery pieces, such as mugs, sushi plates, and candle holders, await custom paints and glazes. Mermaids, planes, and other plastercraft figurines receive customized coats in a a variety of hues. The shop also stockpiles a massive collection of glass tiles that can be transformed into stunning mosaics in the form a flower or surrounding a picture frame. Fine arts classes for youngsters teach fundamentals such as composition and shading, and adult functions corral grownups together for team-building exercises or bridal showers that take a break from the usual throwing-the-bride-in-the-shower routine.

711 Amsterdam Ave.
New York,
NY
US

With a plethora of beer varieties populating its three locations, Beers of the World equips brew-loving beerheads with a bevy of bottles. In addition to marketing microbrews in cases (starting at $19.99), 12 packs (starting at $10.99), and six packs (starting at $6.95), Beers of the World encourages imbibers to purchase bottles individually (starting at $1.35), and thereby groove on a greater variety of fermented fizzies. Evaluate imported brews, such as the Hofbrauhaus Wolters German Pilsener ($19.99/case), against Mendocino Black Hawk Stout ($24.79/case), Genesee Cream Ale ($14.49/30-pack), and other American standouts in an awkward thumb-war. As brew buffs for more than two decades, Beers of the World grants expert advice to more-amateur enthusiasts, and information about beer can be found online.

2599 E Henrietta Rd
Rochester,
NY
US

O Lavrador means "the farmer" in Portuguese, making it an apt name for a restaurant that serves Portuguese food, as Portugal is often described as a "garden planted by the sea." The Iberian menu at O Lavrador Restaurant & Bar's actually combines both Portuguese and Spanish culinary traditions, and has been doing so for 33 years, often showcasing seafood. In addition to sautéd lobster, mussels, and octopus, the menu also includes garlic and spicy piri-piri, seared filet mignon, and grilled rosemary lamb chops. Inside the space, hanging lanterns cast patterned light against brick walls, a wooden canopy, and hand-painted murals, swaying gently above diners enjoying traditional desserts, such as port-poached pear, sweet mousse layered with "bolacha maria" cookies, and caramel flan.

13840 101st Ave
Jamaica,
NY
US

Fermented grapes flourish at Georgetown Wine and Spirits, where a wide range of international bottles await oral adoption by thirsty parents. Customers can peruse Georgetown's variety of varietals, including cabernet, riesling, pinot noir, and merlot, all artfully arranged according to the grape type. Certified sommelier Jon Link, the acting syrah-sergeant of Georgetown Wine and Spirits, sensibly supervises the selection of international sips and suggests his favorites to amateur wine enthusiasts. Wash down a fresh meal or a fresh comeback with a 2007 Morro Bay chardonnay ($10.99) or a 2005 S.A. Prum WS auslese ($29.99). Or opt for a 2009 Thirsty Owl riesling ($13.99) to add appropriately sophisticated accompaniment an evening of jazz and bird calling.

585 Moseley Rd
Fairport,
NY
US

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