Catering in New York

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Dancers in shimmering gowns and tutus, tall hats, and sweeping silks—many crafted by costume designers at St. Petersburg's Mariinsky Theatre—leap, sway, and spin in front of dinner guests. They flow through choreography set to Top 40 hits, contemporary international pop, and Russian classical music, filling a Broadway-sized stage with movements that glow and cast dramatic shadows. Though the show changes frequently, it currently packs in its most popular dances from its 20-year run as a moving homage to what Rasputin Supper Club and Cabaret has been treating its patrons to throughout its history: a taste of royalty.

That doesn't stop at the edge of the stage. While the dancers frolic under a 15-foot projection screen, guests sit back under 30-foot ceilings at the center of a palatial, double-tiered club with an interior designed to reflect the opulence of the old Russian monarchies. On chairs draped in shimmering crimson, guests cluster around gold-clothed tables spread out across hardwood floors. Gilt railings and gates separate the public from performers and private diners, and columns glowing with blue and amber lights scare off swarms of lost noblemen. During meals, the space fills with aromas from the contemporary French and aristocratic Russian dishes that occupy a collection of menus. Often using local ingredients, chefs craft frequently changing dishes such as smoked-salmon rolls, pheasant julien, roasted potatoes and mushrooms, and linguine with red caviar, leaving guests in a state of supreme relaxation while the regal dining area continues to excite.

2670 Coney Island Ave
Brooklyn,
NY
US

Inside the kitchen of TriniSoul, students get the opportunity to face down the scotch bonnet—a lantern-shaped pepper that smolders with 50 times more heat than a jalapeño. The heavy-duty pepper is just one of the extraordinary ingredients introduced to students by Chef D, a Caribbean native who holds court during cooking classes that center around the recipes she grew up enjoying. Her foray into culinary instruction started as a few simple classes on the cuisine of Trinidad and Tobago, but her teaching style developed a rabid following, and Chef D's curriculum has grown to cover many types of Caribbean cuisine as well as American-style soul fare. More than 6,000 students have enrolled in Chef D's classes, which can accommodate groups of up to 24 in TriniSoul's kitchen as well as private instruction in one's own kitchen or properly equipped subway car.

1073 Rogers Ave.
Brooklyn,
New York
US

From dealing with high rents to competing with new business fads, New York institutions can be hard to come by these days. Murray’s Sturgeon Shop, however, curbs that trend and keeps to an old-school tradition of devoted customer service and attention to detail in its artfully plated deli spreads. Since 1946, the Zagat-rated eatery—which also garnered nods from New York Magazine—has stocked products made from its namesake fish, such as smoked sturgeon or caviar. Alaskan salmon, whitefish, and lox complement kosher deli meats such as corned beef and pastrami. To cater parties or Tamagotchi-addiction interventions, the shop delivers ready-to-eat soups, salads, imported cheeses, and indulgent desserts such as old-fashioned crumb cake and rugelach by the pound.

2429 Broadway
New York,
NY
US

Liebman’s Kosher Delicatessen burst onto the Bronx restaurant scene in 1953, when Jewish delis were as abundant as radio programs hosted by beloved racehorses. Few of those delis remain today, but more than 50 years later Liebman’s neon sign still shines bright, beckoning customers to come sample tender corned beef sandwiches, hearty meat and fish platters, and steamy bowls of matzah ball soup. Joseph Dekel acquired the restaurant in 1980, but he wisely chose to leave well enough alone in the kitchen, even enlisting the deli's veteran cooks to train the man who would become, and who remains, the head chef. Today the kitchen continues to produce thick strips of juicy brisket that vie for plate space with potato latkes and apple sauce, as well as triple decker sandwiches that pile on the corned beef, pastrami, and tongue. But the deli has made some adaptations over the years. The menu now contains a list of low-calorie options, a kids' menu with chicken nuggets and bologna sandwiches, and even a Middle Eastern section with falafel and babaganoush.

552 West 235th Street
New York,
NY
US

Property Location
A stay at Clarion Hotel Park Avenue places you in the heart of New York, minutes from Madison Square Park and close to Empire State Building. This hotel is close to Chrysler Building and Times Square.

Rooms
Make yourself at home in one of the 60 air-conditioned guestrooms. Cable television is provided for your entertainment. Bathrooms have complimentary toiletries and hair dryers. Conveniences include safes and complimentary newspapers, as well as multi-line phones with voice mail.

Rec, Spa, Premium Amenities
Make use of convenient amenities such as concierge services, a fireplace in the lobby, and discounted use of a nearby fitness facility.

Dining
A complimentary breakfast is included.

Business, Other Amenities
Featured amenities include complimentary newspapers in the lobby, dry cleaning/laundry services, and a 24-hour front desk. Limited parking (subject to charges) is available onsite.

420 Park Ave S
New York,
NY
US

Rawia Bishara didn't learn her way around the kitchen at culinary school. Instead, she helped her mother cook old world Mediterranean and Middle Eastern dishes, hosted a plethora of dinner parties, and spent the past fourteen years running her own restaurant, Tanoreen. There, she and her staff fuse her mother’s traditional recipes with her own modern touches, creating a medley of past and present more satisfying than a founding-fathers rap battle. The resulting spreads range from classics, such as hummus and falafel, to more unusual flavors such as okra stewed with tomato and lamb, fried striped bass with tahini dipping sauce, and the many creative lamb dishes that prompted New York Magazine to proclaim, "Visiting Tanoreen without ordering lamb in some form seems as perverse as skipping the porterhouse at Peter Luger." As diners savor their meals, they can sip Arabic coffee with tequila and hazelnut, pistachio martinis, and other concoctions from the full bar.

7704 3rd Ave
Brooklyn,
NY
US