Brazilian Restaurants in Newmarket

Select Local Merchants

Executive Chef Chaz Bulera and his team fashion dinner and lunch menus out of selectively sizzled meats, fish, and pasta. Lunch fare, such as a pulled-pork sandwich ($8) and a buffalo-chicken wrap with its coif of blue cheese ($9) effortlessly shame standard sandwich-shop selections. The dinner menu kick-starts appetite engines with sesame-seared ahi tuna ($9) and subtly seasoned calamari ($7) before revving them lightly with a portobello-pesto sandwich ($8) or heavily with a bacon-wrapped filet mignon ($21).

971 E River Rd
Grand Island,
NY
US

Red Mill Inn’s rustic, two-story exterior engenders idyllic visions of a bygone era. Black clapboard shutters pop against the old farmhouse's bright red walls, which were built in 1858, and a giant wooden water mill nestles beside carefully trimmed hedges. Inside, dark wood floors and paneling surround wood tables, a roaring brick fireplace, and antique light fixtures. But this bucolic atmosphere belies a hectic kitchen staff who bustle to conjure flames beneath tender cuts of prime rib and filet mignon. Famous for their char-grilled steaks, fresh seafood, and Sunday brunch specials, Red Mill Inn also specializes in down-home country classics such as pan-fried calf's liver and Yankee pot roast. After dinner, house-made desserts arrive courtesy of an onsite pastry chef, whose creations shock sweet teeth more than a retainer lined with Pop Rocks.

8326 Main Street
Williamsville,
NY
US

Since 1967, Scotch 'n Sirloin's smoky scotches, sizzling steaks, and rustic cabin setting have made it a favorite destination for couples and ravenous lumberjacks alike. The kitchen grills up classic cuts including tender filet mignon and tangy teriyaki-marinated sirloin, and slow-roasts prime rib before plating it with sides such as baked potatoes and sweet potato fries. Besides beef, the restaurant also serves charbroiled lobster tail, center-cut pork chops, and hearty surf-and-turf platters. Bites are accompanied, naturally, by sips of fine scotches and bourbons.

3999 Maple Rd
Amherst,
NY
US

Buffalo Chophouse serves aged prime steaks in an atmosphere surrounded by a sumptuous turn-of-the century décor. Diners can begin with a dish of steamed middleneck clams ($12.50), simmered in white wine and garnished with parsley, and then move on to a carnivorous main course such as the tender 32-ounce bone-in ribeye ($48) or the steamed Alaskan king crab legs ($46). Regardless of what's featured on the plate, dining experiences are inevitably enhanced by the chophouse's plush wraparound seating, low-key lighting, and stoic, standalone piano that’s just begging for a traditional tickling.

282 Franklin St
Buffalo,
NY
US

Jim's Steakout serves up a classic lineup of philly cheesesteaks, hoagies, and chicken fingers, silencing rumbling stomachs from high noon to high moon with locations throughout western New York.

From lunchtime until as late as 2 a.m. or 5 a.m., each of Jim's outposts fills stingers—or hot subs—with steak and cheese, bacon, and combinations of italian sausage and other meats. Hoagies meet nearly every appetite with three sizes, ranging from a lunch-appropriate four-inch Kaiser roll to an Italian roll that reaches an entire foot long. Whichever size diners choose, they can get their roll stuffed with chicken, provolone, and sautéed spinach—known as the chicken-in-the-grass hoagie—or any number of other hot or cold ingredients. The menu also rolls out a red carpet for creative sides such as fries smothered in chopped steak and cheese, stuffed banana peppers, and fried mac 'n' cheese bites. To sweeten each classic meal, the kitchen fries up funnel cakes to order.

2565 Delaware Ave
Buffalo,
NY
US

Foot-high flames erupt from a tower of sliced onions, and a collective “oooooh” leaves the lips of the patrons gathered around the table fitted with a hibachi grill. Chicken, shrimp, scallops, lobster tail, filets mignon, and veggies cook right before diners' eyes before a skilled Tokyo II hibachi chef doles out each browned piece to awaiting plates. In addition to dazzling displays of hibachi meals, the eatery houses a team of talented sushi chefs who work wonders with knives, thinly slicing yellowtail and salmon and whittling plates from the trunk of an oak tree. The staff has given rolls such creative names as Black Betty, White Lilly, and Black Dragon, and the entrees it prepares includes the May Flower, a spread of 18 sushi pieces, plus a spicy tuna and tiger roll. A handful of Thai dishes—pad thai, curry, and coconut-mushroom soup—rounds out the extensive selection of edibles.

2236 Delaware Ave
Buffalo,
NY
US