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A nonprofit theater helmed by passionate cinephiles, Facets Cinematheque instills a love of film in its youngest moviegoers through its groundbreaking children's programs. Since establishing their first children's film exhibition series in 1975, the theater's stewards have branched out into education and outreach, introducing students to positive films and the inspiring stories behind them through channels including family film events, in-school screenings, and the Facets Kids Film Camp. They also oversee the Chicago International Children’s Film Festival, which presents hundreds of films from around the globe during its annual autumn run. Though the festival caters to its smallest attendees, its scope is impressively large; welcoming over 20,000 attendees each year, the festival often offers the first screenings of award-winning fare, such as recent Academy Award winner The Fantastic Flying Books Of Mr. Morris Lessmore.

In addition to their children's programming, the theater also lights up its silver screen with indie films, award winners, foreign flicks, and documentaries. Celluloid-caretakers curate a collection of reels that seldom see screenings elsewhere in Chicago, frequently enjoying their city debut within the intimate 125-seat theater. Occasionally, production-team members or film experts join audiences immediately following the show for Q&A sessions—known as film dialogues—taking questions, exploring themes, and providing tips for removing stubborn popcorn kernels from teeth. Upcoming films can be found on Facets’ website.

Eyeballs absorb moving pictures thanks to the dual capabilities of Facets’ projection system, which handles digital and 35 mm films with equal aplomb. While the ephemeral stories fill brains with new ideas, soda and popcorn—acquirable at the old-fashioned concession stand—fill mouths with flavors that have defined every classic moviegoing experience since Orson Welles first invented the snack.

1517 W Fullerton Ave
Chicago,
IL
US

Sam Elias knows that being cooped up during long winter days can make people stir-crazy. So in 1993, after moving from Florida, land of palm trees and beaches, to Chicago, land of frigid winds and gray slush, he founded WhirlyBall as a way for people to release pent-up energy even as snow was falling outside. During each competitive WhirlyBall game, which combines aspects of basketball, hockey, and jai alai, players zoom across an indoor 50'x80' court in motorized cars called WhirlyBugs. They wield plastic scoops to toss a wiffle ball back and forth to their teammates before throwing the ball through an elevated goal. Refs keep watch during the games, eliminating score arguments that would otherwise end in sunrise duels. To fuel up for a bout, players nibble teriyaki chicken satay, gourmet pizzas, and prime rib, and swig draft beers, which vary by location.

All three WhirlyBall spots boast off-court diversions such as video games, pool tables, foosball, and air hockey. The Vernon Hills location hosts an indoor rock-climbing wall, and both the Chicago and Vernon Hills locations invite guests into multilevel Lasertron laser-tag arenas, which fill with fog and flashing lights as combatants duck, aim, and invoke Geneva Convention protocols regarding armed conflict.

1880 W Fullerton Ave.
Chicago,
IL
US

The 'K' of the Chicago Sky's logo towers above the other letters, two thin prongs poking out from the top?a nod to the most famous of the city's iconic buildings. Fittingly inspired by the Chicago skyline, the Sky's uniforms have represented the Windy City since 2006. In those years, some of the WNBA's top players have donned the blue and yellow threads, including Candice Dupree, Epiphanny Price, and Sylvia Fowles?a defensive star who also wore red, white, and blue in London in 2012. In 2010, the Sky transitioned from the UIC Pavilion to a new, permanent home court, packing its neatly folded coaches into suitcases and moving to the Allstate Arena in Rosemont.

20 W Kinzie St
Chicago,
IL
US

For 18 years, Chicago a cappella has delighted audiences with concerts that eschew instruments in favor of harmonious melodies woven by sopranos, basses, and tenors. This year's holiday program follows in the company's tradition of building piebald programs of ancient and modern songs from around the world, juxtaposing the 14th century carol "In Natali Domini" with Swedish folk songs and African American spirituals. Contemporary tunes include "Longfellow's Carol," composed by Chicago a cappella founder and artistic director Jonathan Miller, as well as the hip-hop infused Hanukkah song "Miracle," which blends reggae, rock, and beatbox sounds into a Yuletide ditty more unconventional than a red-and-green-striped zebra. As accomplished vocalists pipe "Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy," "Joy to the World," and "Carol of the Bells," audiences' Christmas spirit soars until tinsel spontaneously comes out of their noses.

2936 N Southport Ave
Chicago,
IL
US

My Music site Promotes Musicians, Bands, DJS and Record Labels for Talent Marketing and Promotions Worldwide

3228 N Seminary Ave
Chicago,
IL
US

Chemical imbalances have too long been the scapegoat for thieves, killers, and the animated lamp that steals your teeth in that recurring nightmare about the puppy farm. Shake up the biochemical pathways between your funny bone and your laugh bladder with today’s Groupon to Chemically Imbalanced Comedy. For $8, you get four tickets to any of CIC’s shows. Split your tickets among friends (as long as you're all over the age of 13) and go to see a show together, or keep them to yourself and see any four performances you like. CIC is BYOB, so you won’t dump money on overpriced drinks or spend the evening with a dry, humorless throat.

Conveniently located in Wrigleyville near the Irving Park Brown Line and the Sheridan Red Line el stations, Chemically Imbalanced Comedy’s theater is home to a repertoire of improvisational themes and competitions that feature talented comedians from across the city. In Desperately Seeking, CIC's sultans of spontaneity choose a random classified ad from the Chicago Reader’s Matches section and improvise on the life of the person who took out the ad. Place your own ad before you go and wish on a magical cricket that you’ll get to see your life played out before you by the hysterical fun-makers. Otherwise, stop in to see Pimprov, the acclaimed portmanteau that gives four pimps a chance to improvise and escape the repetitive, predictable mundanities of their 9-to-5 (a.m.) day job. If you’re new to the city and need an introduction to all the funny people, head to The Comedy Showcase, which features three different improv or sketch comedy groups each week.

Laughter works your abdominal muscles, stretches your vocal chords, and invigorates your internal organs with radiant vibrations, gently massaging your sweetie’s heart and stimulating his or her sense that maybe it isn’t just the dark and the wine that’s making you look so cute. Cozy up to a potential life-mate in the dark and let mutual bursts of laughter serve as an excuse for sidelong glances and casual arm touches.

Reviews

The Chicago Reader offers this rave review of Chemically Imbalanced Comedy's show Pimprov:

  • The group stays heavily engaged with the crowd throughout this high-energy show, bringing people on stage and carrying on multiple side conversations during and between bits. What I enjoyed most were their hilarious, spontaneous dancing (from tap to b-boying) and varied characters. These are no one-trick pimps: at the show I saw they shrewdly played everything from north side trixies to blue-collar Chicagoans. – Ryan Hubbard, Chicago Reader

Yelpers give the improv group a solid four stars, and four Citysearchers award it a perfect five:

  • Great improv and professional actors…Pushing the envelope for sure but got some great laughs out of our group. My stomach hurt and I was hunched over from laughing. – Kristin K., Yelp
  • This was one of the funniest shows I have seen in a long time. – sally_massino, Citysearch
1420 W Irving Park Rd
Chicago,
IL
US