Charity & Grassroots in Fruitvale

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To increase the number of safe cyclists with bikes meeting the state's night-riding requirements, the EBBC plans to give away and install bike lights at the August 4 screening of Ratatouille, a part of the waterfront summer movie series at Jack London Square. The EBBC encourages attendees to bike to the event so they can take advantage of the opportunity to equip their bikes for a safe, visible ride home that night after the screening. Secure bike parking will be provided at the event.

3301 E 12th St
Oakland,
CA
US

Pairing their civic-mindedness with a strong business sense, a group of University of California, Berkeley students grabbed a laptop and a borrowed pickup and began delivering school supplies to underserved students across the region. Today their initiative, K to College, distributes the resources students need to excel in school and attain a solid education. Collaborating with local businesses, K to College creates grade-appropriate supply kits as part of their Give 22 campaign, named as such because the kits cost $22 to complete—a third of their retail price. Packed in a sturdy canvas tote bag, these kits of pencils, papers, and dental-care items go to public-school students in the free or reduced-price lunch program. K to College also advertises back-to-school efforts through local TV stations and works with the Folsom State Prison to organize community-service opportunities for inmates as part of a rehabilitation program—an effort that caught the attention of CNN.

See how Groupon helps you discover local causes and lend a helping hand at the Groupon Grassroots blog.

7730 Pardee Ln
Oakland,
CA
US

Though it disbanded in 1938, the Wa Sung Athletic Club once stood as Oakland's preeminent all-Chinese semi-pro baseball team. In 1952, the club rose as a non-profit service organization dedicated to the Chinese community, promoting understanding and good will among its citizens. Today, the Wa Sung Community Service Club includes members of all races and ethnic backgrounds, all united in a devotion to to providing service to the entire Oakland community.

388 Ninth St
Oakland,
CA
US

In Sanskrit, the word “niroga” means “freedom from disease.” Staying true to their business' namesake, the instructors and healers at Niroga Yoga Studio strive to guide students down a path of mental, physical, and spiritual healing. The aforementioned path takes on a literal form in the palatial exercise space—students lie on mats beside a path formed in the floorboards that leads to an image of a blossoming lotus. Beneath spheres of soft light, teachers walk about to offer modifications for poses or inspirational shadow puppets. They hold classes that are meditative, therapeutic, or fitness oriented, and regularly offer separate workshops on stress management and the physiological benefits of yoga practice. There are also yoga therapists and massage therapists that can further aid in healing and finding peace of mind.

The nonprofit Niroga Institute, which specializes in transforming the lives of incarcerated youth, underserved high-school students, and cancer survivors, operates Niroga Yoga Studio.

111 Fairmount Ave
Oakland,
CA
US

With the vision of a bracelet in mind, a student lays a strip of steel over an anvil and begins bending it under the blows of a hammer. Down the hall, another budding artist pours molten glass into a mold, which soon cools into a decorative orb. Each year, the faculty at The Crucible educates roughly 5,000 adults and children in arts that range from ceramics to fire dancing. Starting in 1999 with a $1,750 grant, the nonprofit's founders?a small group of artists that includes sculptor Michael Sturtz?nurtured a vision that took them from a 6,000-square-foot warehouse to a solar-powered, 56,000-square-foot arts-education studio. Beyond the classrooms, The Crucible also hosts galleries where both students and faculty show their work, exploring the various elements of design or states of longing for a Twinkie.

1260 7th St
Oakland,
CA
US

What was once vacant military housing is now a thriving community, thanks to Alameda Point Collaborative. In 1999, APC transformed the vacant space into a permanent supportive-housing community that 500 formerly homeless residents—including more than 300 children and young adults—now call home. Residents gain access to resources that can help break the cycle of poverty and homelessness, from job-skills training to substance-abuse and mental-health counseling. Along with 200 housing units across 34 acres, APC operates Ploughshares Nursery, a retail plant nursery that provides residents with opportunities to learn skills in customer service, landscaping, and urban farming.

See how Groupon helps you discover local causes and lend a helping hand at the Groupon Grassroots blog.

677 W Ranger Ave
Alameda,
CA
US