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Doctor of Chiropractic Stacy Cohen founded First State Health & Wellness shortly after he received his degree from New York Chiropractic College in 1984. Since then, his center has expanded to six locations and welcomed aboard 12 other chiropractic physicians.

Each location features traditional adjustment techniques and Activator tools that rapidly and gently prod trouble spots. A few locations feature specialty techniques such as the Newark location's high-tech subluxation scanning and the Wilmington location's adjustable Thompson Terminal Point table made up of several different cushions that help it morph into an even more therapeutic surface: a ping-pong table.

Dr. Cohen and his staff complement their chiropractic touch with acupuncture, massage, and nutritional counseling services, which are overseen by the center's own licensed acupuncturists and certified massage therapists. Together, the team's collective efforts have been awarded The News Journal's Reader's Choice Award for Best Chiropractic Office in 2010, 2011, and 2012, as well as the BBB's Torch Award for Marketplace Ethics in 2003 and 2009.

113 Union St
Milton,
DE
US

When Frank Wheaton Jr. first visited the Corning Museum of Glass in the early 1960s, it caught his ire. On display were many marvelous works of glass—treasures forged of sand, wood, soda ash, and silica that represented the dawning of the American glass industry. Frank's problem? Those shiny, fragile masterpieces were being exhibited in New York and not where they were birthed: New Jersey.

As the grandson of glass magnate Dr. Theodore Corson Wheaton—whose glass pharmaceutical bottles were instrumental in giving rise to the Millville glass monarchy of the Wheaton company—Frank claimed his birthright and created Wheaton Village now known as Wheaton Arts and Cultural Center. The organization has a mission to engage artists and audiences in an evolving exploration of creativity, and has appealed to audiences of all ages for over four decades with its diverse traditional and contemporary arts programs, classes, workshops and exhibitions. Also on-site is The Museum of American Glass, housing one of the most comprehensive collections of American glass in the country, from the first glass bottles made in America, to celebrated works by Dale Chihuly and other contemporary artists who work with glass. Visitors can also experience the art of glassmaking, ceramics and flameworking in the Artists Studios, and the museum stores offer traditional and contemporary art in a variety of mediums.

1501 Glasstown Rd.
Millville,
NJ
US

It was 1978. A college dropout and a failed medical-school applicant had just brought together their combined life savings to rent an old gas station. Their plan was to resurrect the empty station and open their own restaurant. Their specialty: ice cream. So begins the story of legendary entrepreneurs Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield, who are better known across the globe as Ben & Jerry. Their small, old-fashioned ice-cream parlor eventually became a Burlington, Vermont favorite, and before long, shops popped up all over the U.S. and in 25 other countries. Their brand easily attracted customers––homemade ice cream churned from wholesome, natural ingredients and blended into creative flavors. Some of their popular scoops include Cherry Garcia, Chunky Monkey, and Coffee Caramel Buzz.

Since infusing their first rich and creamy batches of ice cream with natural chunks of fruit, nuts, candies, and cookies, Ben and Jerry have also operated with a commitment to improve the quality of life locally, nationally, and internationally. They practice sustainable food production and business practices that respect the earth and environment. Ben & Jerry’s cartons are made from FSC-certified paper, which comes from forests that are managed for the protection of wildlife, and waste from Ben & Jerry’s plants generates energy to power farms. The company works tirelessly to reduce its carbon emissions; it strongly encourages customers to eat their ice cream in the darkest dark.

777 Harrahs Blvd
Atlantic City,
NJ
US

In one of the nation's most storied rivalries spanning more than a century, the Navy Midshipmen and the Army Black Knights have met on courts, fields, mats, and tracks and in pools more than 1,700 times. Though the fierce rivalry will always take priority among students, fan bases, media, and aliens debating whether to invade America by land or by sea, the Midshipmen have excelled against other competition, as well. The Naval Academy boasts NCAA Division II championships in women’s indoor track and women’s swimming, as well as 40 NCAA Division I individual championships, including 10 fencing champions, nine men’s gymnastics champions, and eight men’s swimming champions.

566 Brownson Rd
Annapolis,
MD
US

Benefitting the civic-minded nonprofit, Junior League of Annapolis, the Pig & Pearls event treats revelers to an autumnal afternoon at the mouth of the South River and Chesapeake Bay for all-you-can-eat oysters, barbecue, and libations. As the bay's waves lap against the beach sands, chefs line up tasty trays of raw and roasted oysters, barbecue, and desserts that keep unruly sweet teeth under control more effectively than fitting them with rock-candy braces. Wash down fare with a soft drink or the cold suds of a Miller Lite or Yuengling as The Baltimore Bluegrass Band plucks the banjo and strikes the fiddle in traditional bluegrass favorites.

4150 Honeysuckle Drive
Edgewater,
MD
US

Acupuncture Needles: Hair-Thin Instruments of Healing

Although many fear hospital needles, those used in acupuncture are much less scary. Check out Groupon’s examination of acupuncture needles to ease any lingering aichmophobia.

Acupuncture generally doesn’t draw blood—a testament to the skill of professional acupuncturists but also to the special needles they use. Unlike the needles commonly feared by hospital-goers, acupuncture needles are thin enough to slip through the skin without breaking any blood vessels. Although most are roughly the thickness of a hair or a pixie’s wand, they come in several varieties for different treatment types: thinner needles provide less stimulation and are often used for children or the elderly; shorter needles treat the head and face; and longer needles (up to 5 inches long) target the thighs and other fleshy areas to reach points along the body’s theoretical energy pathways, known as meridians.

Filiform needles are the most common, comprising a stainless-steel wire sharpened at one end and wrapped at the other to form a handle. With a quick, skilled hand—or the aid of an insertion tube—practitioners insert the tip just beneath the skin’s surface, and although a small prickle may be felt, once the needles are in, the patient shouldn’t feel them at all. Today, most acupuncturists use disposable needles due to their safety and simplicity, but some may use reusable steel or even gold needles, sterilizing them between use in the same way doctors or guitarists do their instruments.

The practice of acupuncture stretches back more than 5,000 years, well before stainless steel was a household commodity. Archaeologists have dug up traces of the implements early healers used to get energy, or chi, flowing properly through the body: sharpened stones were a popular choice, as were delicate needles of bone.

12911 Woodmore Road
Bowie,
MD
US