Food & Drink in Oceanside

Select Local Merchants

According to Zagat, the portions of breakfast plates at Broken Yolk Cafe can be "obscene"?although one could also consider them generous. Sometimes, these sizes are even considered a challenge. In 2010, Man Vs. Food's Adam Richman paid the restaurant a visit to tackle its infamous Iron Man Special: a 12-egg omelet, topped with chili and piled onto a 15-inch pizza pan.

Opened in 1979, Broken Yolk has spent decades fine-tuning its southwestern recipes?many enigmatically named for people such as "Betty" and "Tony G". Alongside steaming breakfast burritos and griddled buttermilk pancakes, the menu features nearly 20 omelets stuffed with fresh ingredients such as beef chorizo, avocado, and mushroom sauce. Shredded hash-browns are crafted from fresh potatoes, and the salsa is handmade each day. Until its official closing time at 3 p.m., Broken Yolk also serves sandwiches and half-pound Angus burgers. The local chain's six locations each feature their own private banquet room and secret underground passage to one of the other restaurants.

2434 Vista Way
Oceanside,
CA
US

Guahan Grill doesn't just use its food to give diners a taste of Guam's cuisine. Instead, it tries to give them a small taste of the island lifestyle.

Owner Carlsky Quichocho hoped to share his passion for his home, so he assembled a team that would commit to creating the recipes he grew up loving, as well as a few contemporary renditions of those favorites. Barbecued meats appear prominently throughout the menu, as do dishes with distinctively tropical ingredients, such as the shrimp saut?ed in coconut milk and the platter of fried spam and portuguese sausage. To accompany this hearty, casual cooking, the restaurant offers a selection of beers by the pint or the bottle.

Beer in hand, it becomes that much easier to relax amid Guahan Grill's island-themed decor. Artwork depicting palm trees adorns one of the sunset orange walls, and the entire bar is built from sturdy bamboo stalks. To keep the vibe even more mellow and laid-back, the sound system plays a steady stream of island music and recorded lectures explaining the complex intricacies of applying for a home loan.

4259 Oceanside Blvd
Oceanside,
CA
US

Although it now has more than 430 locations in 28 countries, Hooters wasn’t always welcomed by the public. In fact, when it opened in October 1983 in Clearwater, Florida, the founders of the restaurant were “quickly detained for impersonating restaurateurs,” according to the company's website. But the restaurant was able to prove it was more than just a pretty face—that it was serious about serving tasty American food and frosty brews—and its popularity exploded in the decades to follow.

Amid its beach-themed vibe and flat-screen TVs, Hooters still fuels appetites with its internationally known original chicken wings, burgers, sandwiches, and fresh salads. Of course, nobody carries those casual eats and icy pitchers better than the Hooters girls. To complement their friendly smiles, their uniforms harken back to the ones the original waitresses wore in 1983: orange hot shorts and white tank tops with the emblematic owl on the front—though that owl has lost its Lionel Richie perm.

3186 Vista Way
Oceanside,
CA
US

Guests ride into Surf Bowl under a glowing pink and green sign, and once inside, cast their eyes down freshly polished lanes. As an homage to their name and the local culture, a mural running parallel to the lanes depicts bowling pins engaging in beach activities such as lounging in the sand and testing their own buoyancy in the ocean. Players can stop in for classic games throughout the day, or enjoy Xtreme Glow-in-the-Dark Bowling once night falls. Between games, bowlers can break for a pizza, sandwich, or freshly fried snacks at Blue Wave Café, a casual, diner-style eatery with chrome-accented bar stools. The alley also boasts an arcade, bar, and billiards table.

1401 S Coast Hwy.
Oceanside,
CA
US

One of the original pioneers of the yogurt industry, Golden Spoon Frozen Yogurt has been whirling yogurt since the early 1980s. A bevy of rotating daily flavors includes tastes such as just chocolate, peanut-butter cup, café latte, graham cracker, and mango tart. Sample a small bit with a mini ($2.05 for 4 oz.), or take 32 ounces home to share in a quart ($6.25). Traditionally conical edible yogurt containers (small $2.90, waffle $3.30) make it possible for hands to hold the frozen delight. At 25–29 calories an ounce, health-conscious consumers can enjoy licks without translating each tongueful into the quantity of jumping jacks or flying starfish impersonations needed to offset it.

4160 Oceanside Blvd
Oceanside,
CA
US

Carmine’s proprietor and pie innovator, Tony, carries on the family tradition from his Calabrese-bred father with inventive hand-tossed signature pizzas. The menu brims with whimsical pies formed from fresh dough daily and cooked up on brick-fire ovens that lend each slice a crunchy punch and proclivity for dalmatians. The 18-inch eponymous Carmine comes coated in scallions, garlic, and jalapeños ($17), and the 14-inch Rocky pizza pounds sausage, pepperoni, meatball, and ham into plump ricotta punching bags ($16). Doughy discs are customizable with Carmine’s arsenal of fanciful toppings, such as banana peppers, goat cheese, and artichokes, which pair well with a side of antipasto ($3–$5) or a sweet, peppery house salad ($2–$6). A slew of pasta and panini standbys round out Carmine’s roster of Italian eats.

119 S Coast Hwy
Oceanside,
CA
US